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eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

Posted by sfmomoxo (My Page) on
Sat, Sep 25, 10 at 13:41

I knew it had to happen sooner or later, but the kitchen isn't even done and there it was this morning...plain as day, one big old circle etch on the counter. Was it my DHs salad dressing??? My DDs water glass???

I know some of you have your magic potions for getting out etch marks. Please share. I can't imagine what will happen once we've really moved back in. Ugh!

Thanks so much (yes, again!)...


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

My granite, which is called mont blanc, looks remarkably like quartzite gets heartattack appearing stains from oils and wine. The good news is that I have observed that they actually evaporate out in a few days without any special treatment besides everyday granite/stone spray. I think I read from bill vincent that the better sealants allow liquids to evaporate out. Perhaps yours will do the same?


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

So sorry about the etching. What variety of quartzite is the countertop? I was under the impression that quartzite did not etch. Maybe it's as onelady1dog2girls says and it isn't truly an etch. My bathroom carrera marble countertop darkens with water, but it goes away as the water evaporates. The first time it happened I was panicked that I somehow stained my countertop.


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

I have white opal quartzite. It really does look like etching... I found a discussion on this board with some marble owners using scotchbrite pads. I'll keep my fingers crossed and hope that the marks "evaporate" out. If not, I'm off to the store for some scotchbrite pads.


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

sfmomoxo- this just happened to me with my super white leathered quartzite. I left a white vinegar gallon size jug!! What do I use?


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

Sfmomoxo - How did this turn out? How about you, mtv20?


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

FWIW, our quartzite counters have been in 2 years and they have not etched. We took samples of granite/marble/quartz and exposed them to wine, lime/lemon juice before buying and it was by far the toughest - Interested in the answer above.


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

I also had etching in some areas in the first few months, I have noticed that the spots are all but invisible now! I think it was the sealer getting removed... I am still ocd about cleaning and keeping acid type foods/liquids off the counters thou. (super white quartzite/dolomite)


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

Salmon-slayer - What color quartzite do you have? Thanks!


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Opal White Quartzite

Hi All,

We have been looking at different granites for months trying to find something with a lot of white in it that isn't too busy etc....The Opal White Quartzite that I found being discussed here and in another post titled "what to go with opal white quartzite" has me very interested but I can't seem to find anyone near me who sells it.
Can anyone tell me who makes it and how I might go about finding it? I live in southeast Michigan.
Here is the other post I mentioned.
http://www.thathomesite.com/forums/load/kitchbath/msg0711025824976.html


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

Hi everyone,

Is this an awesome website or what? I've learned so much as we're making our countertop choice. Plus the photos of such amazing kitchens is beyond helpful. We were headed toward Quartzite Bianca (aka Luce de Luna, Aspen White), but Sochi's post on another thread with photos of her Quartzite Bianca sealed the deal.

That said, I was very surprised/disappointed to read about etching since fabricators and suppliers praise the virtues of quartzite being harder, more stain/etch resistant than granite.

I had a few questions to see if we could figure out why some of these white quartzites etch, while others don't, even after deliberate abuse. I sure don't know if it's possible for the same material to come from the identical quarry but end up with somewhat different properties, which might account for the differences in etching. For instance, while all marble etches, and often within seconds, not all marble etches the same. Two different samples of Calcutta, for instance, could produce different etching characteristics, which makes sense because of porosity, calcite and other differences. So, maybe there are these differences among what is called quartzite.

For those who have white quartzite, it would be interesting to find out...

1. What sealer did your installer use? (sealing doesn't protect against etching, but I'm still curious);
2. Do you tend to wipe your countertops daily? (I've been told quartzite will etch, but typically food has to sit on the counter overnight);
3. What product do you use to clean your countertops?
4. Does a stainless steel knife (or Swiss Army knife) cut it?
5. What city/state did you purchase your white quartzite? Did they say what country it came from (I believe all of what they are calling Quartzite Bianca comes from the same quarry in Brazil, but I still ask out of curiosity)
6. If your white quartzite etched, did it remain etched after a few days? If so, did you find a solution to minimize the etching?

I'd also like to know the name of the quartzite Salmon-slayer has.

Thanks!


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

HI all

Our hearts have been set on Quartzite Bianca (aka Luce de luna, Aspen White) but I just found out from our fabricator who called the Marble Institute of America, the reason some quartzites are etching is because... the supplier applied resin to it prior to shipping it to the distributor, which makes it highly susceptible to etching. They apply resin or sealer to it before shipping to "enhance" certain physical characteristics of the stone. Either they don't know or care about how they also make it highly susceptible to etching!!

I also found out from the Marble Institute of America that using cleaners that contain hydrofluoric acid will etch quartzite (as in, cleaning your stainless steel sink and some gets on the countertops).

So... ask the place where you bought your quartzite if the supplier (company that deals with the quarry) applied resin or sealer. If so, that's what's making your countertop etch when say lemon juice gets on it. At least according to my fabricator, there is nothing that can be done after the fact because the resin (or sealer--not to be confused with the sealer your fabricator applies for stain protection) has impregnated the pores and no amount of polishing can reverse it.

I can't tell you how heartbroken we are. WE LOVE Quartzite Bianca but what is available in Portland, OR or Seattle has been resined. If anyone out there has bought Quartzite Bianca in this region and have had no etching problems, please let me know. We would love to get a slab of this as long as i has not been resined.

If you are one of those whose quartzite etched, AND the place you bought it from said it would not etch, I would march right back and ask them to replace it with a slab that has not be resined. That's what a customer in Portland had to do (unfortunately they'd have to go with something different since no unresined QB is available here).

If Sochi still checks in on this thread and can tell us where in Canada you live, I'm hoping you live in Vancouver BC and we can find out where you purchased your QB and we can get it at least to Seattle. Thanks all and sorry for the bad news but I hope this sheds light on why some quartzites etch while others do not. The more customers go back to the distributors who sold products that are defective, the more they will go back to their suppliers to insist on selling them undefective product.


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

More information on why suppliers put resin on slabs prior to shipping (www.mineralszone.com):

Resining is a process when a stone slab is being treated with a resin, any substance of natural or synthetic origin generally exudated from sap of tree or plants. Stone slabs are impregnated with these resins to provide strength to the stone. There are certain slabs that are rejected due to several reasons like brittleness of the stone but now resins are applied on these slabs and the rejected slabs are marketed.

The resining process uses epoxy resins for granites and polyesters for marble. The slabs are first honed and dried, and then the resin is applied. The slabs are then cured in heated ovens, and after the resin is cured, the slabs are sent to the polishing lines where they are polished

Our fabricator said it would be hard to find a slab that has not had resin applied, and resin ingredients vary depending on the country which makes it hard to track what ingredient in the resin reacts to acids on the countertop. This too might explain differences people are experiencing with etching (as compared to their slab not having resin applied). If Sochi still checks this thread, it would be interesting to find out what quarry (country) your Quartzite Bianca came from since you've had no etching. I'm crossing my fingers my slab on hold came from the same place.

Supposedly it's when an acid (which I suppose could include water) is left on the countertop overnight that etching can occur. Apparently etching can be hand polished by a fabricator, but it might not be an exact match to the original polish, but it's better than nothing, right?


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

Padmae
Lots of Quartzite in VAncouver at Margranite. In Burnaby, just on the Vancouver border. 32 slabs of White Pearl alone, plus many others. Not sure if they had Bianca Quartz.


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

thanks for the info here. i am experiencing this exact problem with our Arabesque White (aka Superwhite) quartzite. Etching (confirmed by installer) in the form of rings, spots and even in the shape of my stainless cheese grater that sat on the insland counter. Sad, but unfortunately we were told the same things about sealer applied at the time of quarry as the problem. At first I was skeptical of this response but it sounds like it's a more backed up that I thought. They have offered to repolish and if there is no change or permanent solution we pick a whole new stone...we probably won't even consider that because we love the look of this stone and we don't want to deal with the mess. Right now our entire kitchen looks gorgeous with it, aside from these etching problems. It also cuts or scratches very easliy. all I think are a product of what's sitting on this stone, not the stone itself. I would recommend doing it honed and then sealing it properly. That is likely what I would have done in hindsight with this stone. Almost treat it like a marble, though it's supposed to wear stronger than a granite...but not really. Good luck to all of us with it ;)


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

It has been over a yr since the last posting on this thread. I was planning on putting Arabesque (Super White) quartzite in my kitchen but am freaking out since discovering this thread.

Padmae - what did you finally decide on your counter choice?

I called a major supplier in Seattle & was told they have had no etching issues with quarzite. Is it possible the quarry suppliers have stopped using the etchable expoxy from a yr ago? Any reassurances about quartzite would be appreciated!


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

We have Super White quartzite installed a couple of months. It etches but doesn't stain.

We also had a different quartzite (Madre Perle/ Monte Carlo/ Mother of Pearl) in another kitchen and it neither stains nor etches.

Seems like etching is a problem with Super White for a lot (but oddly not all) people. You need to decide if you can live with it or not.

Btw I would hesitate to leave vinegar on any stone surface.


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RE: eeeek...etching on new quartzite counter

This appears to be an old thread but here is our experience so far. We have had our quartzite (Taj Mahal) in for almost a month and so far no etching. I even accidentally left some lime juice on the counter overnight and no etching. I took a knife to a sample piece of it and could not scratch it.
Our fabricator hates it. He said it was the most difficult stone he has ever worked with, "good for the homeowner, bad for the fabricator". It took him about 4 times longer to fabricate than "typical granite" and he went through 3 diamond blades trying to cut it. He was quite grumpy when he was installing it and seemed to take short cuts with our seams. We are still trying to get this problem resolved.
Our stone, however, does not have a perfect mirrored finish. If you look at it from an angle with light shining on it it has a scratched like appearance from all the veins and crystals. Never had granite before so not sure if this is normal. It is smooth to the touch. It does appear to be bullet proof, however.


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