Return to the Kitchens Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

Posted by circuspeanut (My Page) on
Thu, Aug 2, 12 at 11:46

Oooh, look what I just discovered under the vct tile in my new old house. The vintage gods have blessed us and the particle board above it was not glued on, just stapled, so it's just a matter of ripping it off carefully. The surface of the linoleum looks pretty good, albeit with some yellowing, and I've read that one can sand it carefully and refinish, since the color goes all the way through.

Since the previous owners absconded with the house plans, I'm hoping this lino border can provide a 'map' as to the original outlines of the kitchen space.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

Very cool. I like the pattern on the grey section.


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

Terrific! I didn't realize it could be refinished. Your former owners did a good job choosing color and pattern for several generations' use. If only we could see their reaction to your delight nearly a century later, though... :)


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

It's like Christmas, isn't it? :)


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

That's great!

MamaGoose posted this scullery link, on the Smaller Homes forum...originally from the kitchen forum. You've probably seen it before, but if you could somehow open the wall between the butler's pantry and the kitchen (maybe take down that mudroom wall?) this might be another option.

Here is a link that might be useful: Link to Scullery


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

That would be so cool.


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

I really, really hate to say this, but: Test it for asbestos--especially if you want to sand it.


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

From what I've read linoleum itself was never made with asbestos. It's possible that the backing or glue could contain it, but I think in 1910 unlikely. Asbestos started to be used more widely in flooring in the 1920's with asphalt tiles and really took off in the 1940's and '50s with introduction of vinyl flooring.

We had to remove our old kitchen floor in our 1909 house due to a 1950's remodel with vinyl asbestos tile, so you need to be sure the floor is original.


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

I agree that there's strong hope there's no asbestos there, but testing really is called for.


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

Was thinking the same thing...
Good luck!
Great find for historical purposes


 o
RE: more buried treasure! old 1910 lino floor

Aside from color, the patterning on my Marmoleum is the same as your beautiful original linoleum. I'd love to see it refinished, good luck!


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Kitchens Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here