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How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave ov?

Posted by swampwiz (My Page) on
Wed, Jun 3, 09 at 20:52

My kitchen will have a section of countertop that will have an adjacent toaster oven and microwave oven (each with its own receptacle.) It seems that it would make sense for thes to share a single 20A circuit, and to have all the others go another. Any ideas on the typical power draw for these appliances?


Follow-Up Postings:

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what about a refrigerator?

How many amps for that?


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

My electrician son says our microwave pulls 14.4 (average counter top model), and a toaster oven will pull more than 5. A breaker will trip at 80%. So, you can have them on the same circuit, you just can't run them at the same time.
I actually have this problem. My toaster and micro are on the same circuit. If I have them both on at the same time, the circuit flips. That WILL be fixed in my next kitchen, micro on it's own circuit.
S


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

A toaster oven and a MW together will trip a breaker. A MW really needs a dedicated circuit, as they use up most of the 20 amps on a 20 amp circuit. Plus, you need 2 20 amp GFI countertop receptacle circuits. If you use your toaster oven a lot, I'd suggest a dedicated circuit for it as well. Appliances that heat use a LOT of electricity, and if you have it plugged into the same circuit as your coffee maker and try to use both at the same time, you run the risk of tripping it then too.


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

My old kitchen had that too and it'd trip the circuit if both were on.

So happy to now have a dedicated line for the MW so I can run both at once.

I didn't get a dedicated drop for the toaster oven, but everything else is split on 3 more circuits, so I think O have enough power.


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

We don't use the toaster that much, and I don't think we've ever used it the same time as MW but it is a good idea to have MW on its own circuit. Coffeemakers can pull 8A or so too, so you might want to make sure where you plan to put your coffeepot is on a different circuit from toaster oven since there's a good chance the 2 will be on at the same time. As long as each is on a different small appliance circuit, no need for dedicated for either one. Look at what else you might have running at the same time - crockpot, electric frypan/wok/griddle, you might want a third small appliance circuit in a certain area, as well as the dedicated MW circuit.

Fridge should be on its own circuit - electrician should know that. I'd go 20A (not sure it's required by code but good idea), even though my Energystar fridge says max draw is just over 6A.


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

Isn't it a requirement to have double circuits at kitchen outlets? Then each hole in a double outlet gets 15 Amperes. Each appliance plugged in gets 15A.


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

David you're confusing amperage with voltage. The requirement is for 2 20 amp "countertop" electrical services of 120 volts, and then code requires that each appliance installed be installed to manufacturer's requirements. Many times that means installing dedicated 120 amp circuits for the refrigerator, microwave, vent hood, and even a gas range. Some manufacturers stipulate that their appliance only go on a dedicated circuit, usually because the power draw at startup is a lot more than at running.

More information about planning proper kitchen wiring correctly can be found at the Electrical Wiring Forum. Be aware that many older homes must undergo an upgrade in service to the home in order to do a kitchen remodel and that needs to be factored into the budget.

Here is a link that might be useful: Electrical Wiring


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

"A breaker will trip at 80%."

Breakers start to trip at 100% of rated current.

Residential breakers are 'inverse time' breakers, also known as thermal-magnetic.

They will tolerate short overloads for periods of up to minutes, while tripping in milliseconds at many times their rating.

This is accomplished by using both a heater to trip the breaker, and a coil to trip using the magnetic force generated by a large current overload.

Toasters can run well over 1000 watts and pull over 10 amps.
Microwaves have a starting surge that can pull 15 amps.

You can get away with using them on separate 20 amp counter circuits, and two are required by the NEC.


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RE: How many amps for a circuit with a toaster oven and microwave

One other solution--we purchased a Panasonic microwave/convection oven. Expensive but saves space in the appliance garage and avoids this dilemma. Frankly, we use it mostly as a MW.


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