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Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

Posted by trpltongue (My Page) on
Thu, Jun 18, 09 at 8:34

Hi all,

I've been pouring over the forums trying to find a set of replacement cookware for my circulon as we are going to be getting an induction cooktop in our new house.

There are a number of threads discussing best cookware for induction with really great opinions and advice, however, I have been spoiled by my all non-stick circulon cookware and there hasn't been much discussion about non-stick cookware with induction cooktops.

In truth, my wife and I are not dilligent enough to properly care for cast iron, so that really is not an option for us.

My other concern is that our circulon coating is peeling off and it makes me nervous.

So....is there any good non-stick cookware that doesn't use teflon and is induction capable (preferably less than $500 for a typical 12pc set)?

Thanks for the help all, I'm back to crawling through the induction cookware threads :)

Russell


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

I've stopped using non-stick cookware because of the peeling issue you mentioned. I don't think it makes sense to buy a full set of non-stick cookware, because you really don't need a non-stick surface for saucepans and pots. My induction pots and pans without non-stick coating work wonderfully -- the only things I've cooked that stick a little are eggs and fried potatoes. I plan to purchase a couple CIA Masters non-stick frying pans from Amazon.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

Russell

Stop using that peeling non-stick pan right now!! It's a danger to your health.

The problem with non-stick is that eventually you will find that ALL non-stick, no matter how pricey, deteriorates.

I have induction and I have one non-stick all clad fry pan that I use exclusively for egg based dishes - frittata, omelettes, crepes. It is a joy to cook in. It is ALWAYS handwashed.

Tamontino is a brand sold by walmart that is induction capable. I have a couple of their stockpots and a fry pan and find them to be of excellent quality and almost as responsive to induction as my All Clad set. I don't know if they make non-stick but it's worth a look.

Circulon is another brand that makes non stick induction capable cookware. IIRC they had a speciall offer for a fry pan at $29. You may want to see if you can find out more on that. Ah, wait you have circulon. Are you sure ist's not induction capable? try seeing if a magnet will stick to it STRONGLY.

You will LOVE induction with the right cookware.

Here is a link that might be useful: Induction cookware thread you may find useful


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

I only have one non stick pan. An All Clad SS that is about 6 yrs old. I only use for eggs, cheese and it looks like new. I wash this pan by hand and it has never seen a metal utensil. I find the rest of the AC SS very easy to care for, in the DW every night.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

Thanks for the info all.

My desire to go with non-stick is because of the ease of cleanup and cooking "sticky" foods. With a 5yr old and 2yr old, time is at a premium and neither myself nor my wife want to spend time scrubbing the cookware. We often times don't even wash the cookware until the next morning :( With Circulon non-stick it's not a problem because the food wipes off so easily. Would this even be possible with SS or Anodized Al cookware without having to scrub my elbows off?

My only experience with standard pots and pans is my parents set which is a lower end aluminum and everything sticks and is a nightmare to clean. It was so bad that the last time I came up to visit I actually bought 2 circulon frying pans to use while we were there.

I would be alright going with standard stock pots and pans as long as they're easy to cleanup, and keep 1 or 2 non-stick pans for medium heat "sticky" foods, but I haven't figured out which standard pans are "easy" to clean.

I have been reading about the ScanPan cookware which looks to be a good alternative which is a ceramic based non-stick, not teflon and comes with a lifetime warranty. However, I've only just begun reading about it and don't know if it's quality or even induction capable.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

Good quality stainless cleans up as quickly as non-stick. Really, it does. I bought my set back in the 80s when I was a student and it's got a few dents in it, but the finish is as good as new, nearly.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

It's not cheap, but enamelled cast iron cleans up easily. You still don't want to stir with a fork (wood or silicone is best), but it's pretty easy to care for and very easy to use. Heavy though.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

trpltongue,
15+ years ago I bought a set of Scanpan pans +extras (since they were rated very highly in Consumer Reports). I am also going to induction and I haven't even bothered to test the pans tosee if they are magnetic because I absolutely hate them. Everything sticks to them. I talked to the kitchen store and they said the problem was that these pans work differently and you have to slowly increase the heat and that you don't have to use as high a flame because they cinduct the heat so well up the sides. They said to hit the pan with steel wool and get it back to new. Yes, you can scour the ceramic surface-good thing because that's the only way it's gonna come clean!

Well...somebody forgot to tell that to my pans. I don't care how low I put the heat, food sticks. Even bacon sticks! I even tried swapping out one pan for a new onbe thinking I got a bad batch. No dice. I finally gave up.

Several years ago I bought a set of Kitchenaid 18/10 SS (with induction in mind) for about $130. As Erikanh said you really only need non-stick for the skillets. It was rated well on CR and I love the silicone handle grips! Stuff does stick but it's easy to clean if you soak for just a couple of minutes. It was tough to find at the time and I'm not sure it's still available but I saw a set in Sears the other day that looked suspciously similar. in Sears (?)stainless

FWIW a friend of mine that was an All-Clad snob but couldn't afford them, finally gave up and bought a set of Emeril pans. I don't know if they're induction compatible but she recently said she is absolutely thrilled with them and no longer has All Clad envy.

My induction cooktop is on order so I'm looking for a few extra pieces too. I found a pressure cooker just in time for Father's Day ;-) I saw some pans by Berndes at Tuesday Morning. I had never heard of them but I've seen people recommend them here. I also saw some Scanpan Fusion that were labed induction but if they are naything like the regular Scanpan I'd stay away from them. They also had some Le Crueset for half price which was still over $100. Good grief. It is that hard to enamel cast iron? What is so great about that stuff?


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

I use cast iron, stainless, and one cheap (and therefore disposable, but it's held up well) nonstick from Ikea. You can get by without nonstick, but for some things you just almost need it. (Eggs.)

Be careful with nonstick on induction--you don't want the coating to get too hot because it may be toxic, and it'll get hot FAST with induction.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

Which induction units did you all buy?

I know this isnt the appliance forum, but Id sure be interested to know if you all dont mind. :-)


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

I received a set Circulon Infinite as a gift as I was finishing up my kitchen remodel (that included an induction cooktop). However I had previously had a regular Circulon frying pan and was so unimpressed with how long that pan lasted before little bits of teflon were flaking off in my food, that I returned the Circulon Infinite set unopened.

I ended up buying a stainless steel set from Sears, and then bought three matching non-stick skillets.
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00809570000P?vName=For+the+Home&cName=Cookware+%26+Gadgets&sName=Cookware+Sets&keyword=cookware
Cleanup of the stainless steel set is usually pretty easy, especially since they aren't affected by being put in the dishwasher.

Two of the three non-stick skillets are already losing their non-stick-ness, and the omelet pan-sized one will have to be replaced soon.

I also previously had a ScanPan omelet pan, and it was the best, longest-lasting non-stick pan I ever used, but it is not induction capable. Supposedly an induction-cabable line caused ScanPan CTX is going to be released in the US in June 2009, however as I've been checking back the release date continually gets pushed out, so I'm not holding my breath for June 2009.

Lastly regarding ScanPan and Swiss Diamond, both of which claim to contain no Teflon(TM) it is simply semantics. Their non-stick coating contains the same chemical that is sold by DuPont as Teflon(TM) but since they do not purchase the chemical from DuPont, they don't call it Teflon (and are prohibited from doing so.)


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

Miele 36-inch


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

You may want to revisit your cooking technique.

A good investment would be a basic saute class at a local cooking school and would probably save you a ton of money down the road.

If your food is sticking to your pan you are not waiting long enough. Food that is properly seared will lift easily from the pan leaving behind only a little bit of sticky stuff. The sticky stuff left behind is called fond and is highly desirable for making a pan sauce. It adds incredible flavor. Even when I am not making a pan sauce, I add a cup of water to my pan as soon as the food comes out and scrape up the bits left behind with a bamboo spatula. My AC pans and saucepans look like new and I use them EVERYDAY. I toss them in the DW too except for the non stick one. You should also know that I bake and cook for money and one of my most requested desserts is toffee. Nothing is stickier than burnt on toffee (yes it happens to the best of us) and a good soak or two in very hot water and some Bar Keeper's Friend gets my saucepans looking as good as new.

Le Creuset is great but the only piece I would spend the money on would be a 5 or 6qt dutch oven. You can get a cheaper version rated just as highly by Cooks Illustrated at Target for under $60. They hold the heat amazingly well which makes them ideally suited to long slow cooking methods whether stove top or oven based, like braises, stews and soups. Because they hold heat so well they are not a good choice where responsiveness to heat is an essential element of the cooking technique like bring something to a boil and turn down to simmer. You will end up with a burnt sauce. And if you do have or get one, be sure to try the no-knead Bread. BUT another caution...if you use a dutch oven or any other pan in the oven, make sure the handle/knob is oven safe or it will melt.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

loves2cook4six: I'm not sure if you're referring to my cooking or another poster but the only pan I've ever had trouble with sticking is the Scan Pan. I've never owned All Clad.

Would you only spring for the LeCrueset brand in the 5 or 6 qt or are you saying that's the only size you would buy in even the cheaper Target Brand?

Bob_cville: I'm happy to hear somebody had luck with the Scan Pan. Do you know how old yours are? Mine have to be at least 10 years old because I bought them when my parents still lived in Asheville. I'm thinking it said something about ceramic and titanium. They were definitely different than your standard teflon. I never saw any flaking of any type of coating and their literature actually recommended scouring the pan with a steel or copper pad if food started sticking and said you could use metal utensils in the pan. They also recommended rinsing immediately with water, directly after taking the pan off the stove, which is typically a no no. Is that what you have?

FWIW, I did see Scan Pan "Fusion" pans at Tuesday Morning. The box said they worked with induction and I think they were about $50 each.
As to the cooktop, I finlaly ended up going with the 30" Meile. I was going to go with the GE Profile but it had the most restrictive clearance requirements. The Miele had a little more power at each burner and had teh separate tiemrs but mostly, it had a great reputation for quality and that pushed me over the egde.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

mdod I wasn't referring to you in particular but with sticking food in general. And dh just mentioned that the pan could be a factor in that as well.

But try it foryourself. Saute a chicken breast in a swirl of EVOO. Get the pan really hot before you add the oil, so hot that water bounces before evaporating, then add you oil and it will heat quickly to a shimmer. Place the chicken breast in the pan and you will notice it sticks instantly to the bottom of the pan.

You have to leave it untouched until it releases on it's own which can take 3-5 minutes or more depending on how hot both your stove and your pan can get.

As for the Le Creuset: I have both a 6qt LC and a Target brand Dutch Oven (DO). I bought the target one and received the LC as a gift and to my mind they are so similar I would personally never spring for the LC. I have made the identical bread recipe in both at the same time in the same oven and both have come out identical. So unless you love the color of one over the other I would go for saving $$$ and get the one from Target which BTW, has a heat safe knob. I had to replace the knob on the LC with a metal draw knob to prevent melting.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

"Stop using that peeling non-stick pan right now!! It's a danger to your health. "

Teflon is used in implantable medical devices all the time.

It is not a hazard.

Burning Teflon can produce noxious gases (they are particularly lethal to birds), and the chemicals used to MAKE Teflon are toxic.

Once the process is complete, Teflon is one of the most inert things around.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

brickeyee

Not to discredit you or anything but maybe you should read the attached link before you make such a blanket statement (and yes, I have Teflon coated non stick pans that I use)

or this site
http://www.torayfluorofibers.com/TEFLONADVANTAGE/ProductSafetyInfo/tabid/60/Default.aspx

where, and I quote,


Do not use TFA materials in medical applications involving permanent implantation in the human body or permanent contact with internal body fluids or tissues.

Do not use TFA materials in medical applications involving brief or temporary implantation in the human body or contact with internal body fluids or tissues, unless the material has been provided directly from TFA under a contract which expressly acknowledges the contemplated use.

TFA makes no representation, promise, express warranty or implied warranty concerning the suitability of these materials for use in implantation in the human body or in contact with internal body fluids or tissues.

The content of TFA material is not certified for implants. TFA materials are not designed or manufactured for use in implantation in the human body or in contact with internal body fluids or tissues. TFA has not performed clinical testing of these materials for implantation. TFA will not provide to customers making implantable devices any notice concerning its materials, as specified under 21 C.F.R. section 820.81, or any other information necessary for medical device use of the materials under any other statute or FDA regulation. TFA has neither sought, nor received, approval from the FDA for the use of these materials in implantation in the human body or in contact with internal body fluids or tissues.

Do not make reference to the TFA name or any TFA trademark in association with an implantable medical device. Do not use a TFA trademark as the descriptive name of an implantable medical device (e.g., do not call it the "TEFLON prosthesis").

All implantable medical devices carry a risk of failure and adverse consequences. Regarding implantation of materials, you should rely upon the medical judgment of the physician, the medical device seller, and the FDA. Do not rely upon TFA. Examples of both harmful consequences and lifesaving benefits from the implantation of various materials can be found in published medical articles. Without performing clinical medical studies of an implantable medical device, TFA cannot weigh the benefits against the risks of that device and cannot offer a medical judgment on the safety or efficacy of the use of our material in that device.

Regardless, once teflon coatings begin to peel, the chemical is breaking down and many authorities more versed in toxicity than I are recommending to toss that pan asap.

Here is a link that might be useful: EPA Risk assesment EPA Draft Risk Assesment of teflon and it's by products


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

I agree with Loves about Le Creuset, that other enamelled cast iron is just as good. The main reason to spend for Le Creuset is the color, especially the ombre ones. Not a cooking thing at all! But there are a few shapes that I've never seen in other lines. The "Soup Pot" is really good.

Demeyere also makes some cookware especially designed for induction cooking. It's pretty pricey, and I have no idea if it's all it's cracked up to be, but if you're looking, it's something to look at.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

I got my Demeyere 5-pc cookware set for free when I purchased my Miele cooktop. Very, very nice, but crazy expensive, would never have paid full price.

I also have a set of Lagostina from Williams Sonoma. It was heavily discounted at Christmas time. Also very nice.

I really love that with induction the bottoms of my pans don't get dirty, so that I can display my most-used pieces on the wall potrack and keep them within easy reach.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

"Not to discredit you or anything but maybe you should read the attached link before you make such a blanket statement (and yes, I have Teflon coated non stick pans that I use)

or this site
http://www.torayfluorofibers.com/TEFLONADVANTAGE/ProductSafetyInfo/tabid/60/Default.aspx

where, and I quote,

Do not use TFA materials in medical applications involving permanent implantation in the human body or permanent contact with internal body fluids or tissues...."

This is a standard manufacturing disclaimer to prevent liability.

It has nothing to do with the safety of Teflon in implantation.
Every IV used has a Teflon sleeve over the needle to create the catheter.
The needle is used to get the sleeve into a vein, and then the needle is withdrawn leaving the Teflon catheter.

Every semiconductor manufacturer has a warning like this that their parts may not be used in medical devices that are required for life support.

:All implantable medical devices carry a risk of failure and adverse consequences. Regarding implantation of materials, you should rely upon the medical judgment of the physician, the medical device seller, and the FDA. Do not rely upon TFA. Examples of both harmful consequences and lifesaving benefits from the implantation of various materials can be found in published medical articles. Without performing clinical medical studies of an implantable medical device, TFA cannot weigh the benefits against the risks of that device and cannot offer a medical judgment on the safety or efficacy of the use of our material in that device. "

This neatly says it all.
They do not want ANY liability based on using their materials.
It has NOTHING to do with the actual material.
There product may not be 'clean' enough for implantation, was unlikely to have been manufactured under FDA rules, etc.

Peeling Teflon is not "breaking down."
The pieces that beak off are exactly the same as the Teflon in the pan.
There has been no chemical change in the material just because it lost its bond to the underlying metal.


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

We installed a GE Profile 30" induction cooktop about 3 months ago. I purchased some non-stick saute pans and regular sauce pans from Marshall's (brand name of Tivoli). They have glass tops. I think they work great! You can also get a non-stick set of cookware from Costco for approximately $199. Personally I didn't care to have a non-stick surface in my sauce pans (which is what you get in the Costco set) so I went with the Tivoli. They clean up and work great on the induction, and are inexpensive. I hope you enjoy your induction as much as I enjoy mine!!


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RE: Help with Non-stick cookware for induction

I don't have a set of cookware. When I got a countertop induction unit, I began purchasing pieces that would work and were affordable. The only non-stick is a skillet (Kitchenaid). After two years of use, and a few times in the DW, the coating is scratched around the edge. It needs to be replaced. I have one carbon steel flat-bottom wok.

All the other pieces are cast iron. Lodge Logic is enameled, and not very expensive. I have a skillet and a 3 qt covered dutch oven. The enamel Chefmate from Target is chipped, and the interior of the pot stained from baking no-knead bread. I wouldn't buy it again.

My very favorite cast iron is Staub. Both cocotte pieces were on sale at Sur La Table. I love that the open handles are easy to grab. I make steel-cut oats and use it to boil eggs. There is no problem with residual heat when reducing from a boil to simmer.


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