Return to the Kitchens Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

Posted by rococogurl (My Page) on
Sat, May 15, 10 at 18:08

I've got a deep sink which is comfortable. So far, the $5 Lowe's clear rubber grid that sits on one side has worked just fine. But it's wearing and food bits get caught on it so I'm wondering about a stainless sink grid with the little legs. One is made for my sink (Julien 16 x 28).

In the past when I've encountered these I tend to remove them as the silverware slips underneath and things seemed less stable than on the rubber mat. I don't need spoons in the disposer.

Do food bits stick? Hard to clean? Anyone think these are a waste of money?

I'm not concerned about scratching just wondering about the general sink-grid need-to-have/not consensus.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

My flatware doesn't slip underneath mine, but it has acrylic handles so maybe that makes a difference. I like my Kohler grid a lot. Sometimes. Sometimes I take it out. Great thing about these things is that they move! I got spares so I'll be set for the next 20-30 years.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

Our sink grid (that for a silgranit super single) is one of my favorite things about our new kitchen. Honestly! It is not hard to clean at all. None of my silverware has slipped below but should it ever, I'll just lift up the grid.

Also, any scraped off food stays at the bottom while dishes do not hold the gunk. If I don't have my dish rack out I could leave a clean dish on top of the grid to dry and still use the sink with the faucet turned to the other side.

I will always have one, from now on.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I never had one before, but now can't imagine living without one. It holds dishes above the water, acts as a good drain, is easy to clean (just soak in sink), can protect my sink from my barbeques grill, etc.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I have the Blanco ss sink grid for the super single sink. It's one of the best decisions I made for the kitchen. Like pp said, it's not hard to keep clean. At the end of the evening when I wipe down the sink I use the faucet sprayer function to rinse the grid. Since I hand wash all my pots and pans it's also great protection for the sink.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I've had one for all of 3 days -- like it thus far. Like washing dishes and then putting them on rack to dry . . .


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I've always used a sink grid (at least for as long as i can remember!). When we got our Julien sink it was worth it to us to pay the $$$ for the "matching" grid. Once in a rare while (less often than happened with other grids we'd used in our previous sinks), a knife or something will slip between the bars of the grid.

The rubber feet have left "rub" marks on the bottom of the sink. Since the grid is always in the sink, unless the sink or it is in the process of being cleaned, it's not an in your face sort of thing.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I splurged on the Blanco grid that went with my Blanco SS sink. (I'm sure I could have gotten a third-party grid for less money, but it wouldn't have been as precise a fit.)

Love, love, love it. I'm someone who grew up with the Rubbermaid rubber-coated grids that always got slimy. Don't have that problem with the SS grid. Silverware never gets caught underneath - the grid is too tight. Easy to clean - I basically just blast it with the sprayer from my faucet (also Blanco ;-)). And as other people have mentioned, I love that it keeps the dishes above the dirty water.

Will never not have a grid.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

Wow, so positive. catmom, I know you are very particular about the sink -- wondering if the "rub" marks are permanent over time in those spots or do they come off when the sink is scrubbed down? My rubber grid leaves a little pattern but it quickly disappears. Found that Mrs. Meyer's cleans it beautifully (go figure).

Also sounds like most went for the matching grid and spent a bit more. Now I have some thinking to do.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

Love my grid. If you have deep a sink it effectively brings the bottom up nearly an inch, so less reaching if you are tall. I give it the occasional scrub with my sink brush to keep it clean.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I've never used a sink grid before. Has anyone ever used it with a soapstone sink?


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

The rub marks seem pretty permanent. They might be the opposite of rub marks. Maybe they are "pristine" marks LOL--areas that are covered (by the rubber feet), and therefore are un-patina'd. :-)

As I said, they're really not visible until you lift the grid out of the sink and since the grid is in the sink 99.9% of the time, is not on my radar.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

We're neutral about our sink grid and use it about 30% of the time. Whitehaus fireclay farm sink, rear drain, stainless grid. I dislike how silverware is always sliding through and getting lodged underneath it, and you have to lift everything out of the sink (wet dirty pans, etc) to get the utensils out.

This might be a grid design issue? Mine is made of long narrow wires, leaving lots of room for things to fall through and under. I wonder if a tighter grid design might solve this issue? In any case I'd recommend finding one that has more crosswires than mine:


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I can see how yours would allow more flatware to fall through. My grid has wires in both directions and a circular drain opening no bigger than the sink drain.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

I asked this same question about 6 weeks ago, and got pretty much the same responses. People seem to love them, so I ordered 2 for my Blanco 60/40 silgranit sink.

They look really sharp in the sink:) As far as function, It's nice because you can rinse the sink without moving them, (as oppossed to lifting up the slimy rubber mat). And I agree with what the others said as well. So far I like them. The only thing I found that I was not expecting was that I have to add more water in the washing side of the sink for soaking the dirty dishes because the grid lifts the dishes up higher. Not a big deal, but I like to conserve water, living in "always drought season" California.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

We love our sink grids. Never a problem with flatware slipping through or food bits sticking. They are rinsed constantly by the pull-down, and to deep clean them, simply add them to a load in the dishwasher (as we do about once per month). They allow better drainage of things awaiting hand wash, and they keep the bottom of the sink (SS, in our case) in pristine, scratch-free condition. Would never want to go without them!


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

To add to everyone else's comments....

I agree w/all the positives that have been said above plus the biggie for me: When I drain pasta, I no longer have a "backwash" of water surging up into the colander (and pasta)! Even w/footed colanders, I used to have to very, very slowly dump the water to prevent the backwash. Now...I just dump and go...quick & easy!

KitchenAddict...you could remove the grids when washing dishes.


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

Could this be a sign?????

The edge of current mat was just melted by a hot pot placed in the sink. LOL

Any comments on this design? It's the one for my sink.

BTW I've complained about cleaning this sink but I'm cooking for a party tomorrow and 3 pounds of pasta in 2 12-quart pots just fit side by side.

Here is a link that might be useful: sink grid


 o
RE: Who Loves/Hates the Sink Grid?

tap, tap, tap. That's me, waiting for the sink grid which was ordered weeks ago and no delivery date in sight. Ah, the joys of a Julien sink.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Kitchens Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here