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Contrasting Hardwood

Posted by P_Bennett (My Page) on
Mon, May 6, 13 at 18:04

We had a horrible vinyl floor in our kitchen until we just replaced it with 3 1/4" white oak hardwood floors. It looks great. The problem is that our living room, next to the kitchen had 20 year old white oak hardwood in 2 1/4" planks that was impossible to replicate (nor did we want to). So we eventually decided to leave them differently. The color can always be refinished, but any initial thoughts on the contrasting of the hardwood? Looking for honest opinions. Horrible, ok, no big deal.

I can take honest critisism knowing that it still looks 10x better than the crap we had in there before.

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

I don't mind the contrast so much, although the only thing I may have considered would have been to run the direction of new floor perpendicular to the old, so a definite room transition is obvious.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

Honestly it doesn't look bad. How wide is the opening? If the transition bothers you could you place a rug there?

Your other oak floor that is older still looks to be in great shape, and your new floor is very pretty.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

The difference in color and size isn't bad.

The transition strip needs to go though. You want the transition to be the same height if possible. Just a simple crosswise board would be enough. If there is a small height difference, then you use a crosswise flat piece that is sawn on a low angle to make the transition as broad as possible.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

Yes! Live wire hit the nail on the head!


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

Totally fine...


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

Thanks, everyone! The transition strip actually is the same height, there's no bump at all.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

The only thing I would do is make the transition the width of the entire doorway, not that skinny thing with half the door left in the old wood.

You can cut out the old stuff to make the area wider and insert a flat transition: one plank, or several, running across the opening.

that way it looks like you planned the transition, didn;t just cover up a gap.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

I think it looks fine.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

We have the same. The color of your new floor will change some over time and will match your old flooring better. I think it looks fine. I didn't even notice until our GC pointed it out that we had 2 different types of flooring (maple and oak) on our first floor - after 4 years of living there. So yeah, it's not something people notice.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

The flooring on the left (old) looks like ash, the new looks like red oak. But what do I know?
Casey


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

I like lazygardens idea of widening the transition piece to match the width of the wall/door. It then looks more intentional, and provides a bit more separation of the two widths.


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

@lazygardens - that's a good idea.

Thanks!


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RE: Contrasting Hardwood

I don't think it looks bad at all. I do like the idea of putting in a wider transition strip. We have the same issue with our house and I stressed and stressed over it as the transition is in a wide open space. Honestly, no one notices it at all. You eye is drawn higher to the kitchen and counters.


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