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Power strip for charging drawer

Posted by pseudochef (My Page) on
Thu, May 9, 13 at 14:36

I'm looking for a power strip to put inside a drawer in the new kitchen. I've been told there's one with a cord that can extend and contract (like a hair dryer cord) so when the drawer opens and closes the cord will follow. Does anyone know of a brand of power strip like this? Have any other suggestions?

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

I looked for something like that and didn't find it. Shoulda, woulda, coulda, asked here. Duh... anyway, our electrician actually shortened the cord of our power strip. The cabin guys actually built a shelf that supports the cord and keeps it from dropping down behind the drawer and into the lower drawer.... does that make sense? I couldn't get a very good picture. But however they did it, it seems to work just fine.

the plug behind drawer and cord shelf photo DSCN2125_zps3f443cf1.jpg

my charging drawer photo DSCN2118_zps4bd9fa83.jpg


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Do you want the cell phones to actually stay in the drawers? Not lay on the counter?


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

I haven't taken a new picture but have a small (3 spot) surge protector with 2USB ports plugged in the back of the cabinet.
My new music box is plugged in and is currently in a drawer.
My USB items are in a bin below the drawer.
It's important to look at cable management and inspect cords at regular intervals. I plan to add a protective housing on the drawer cord to enhance safety.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Pictures, please?


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

In my upcoming remodel, I'm including a "desk" cabinet in a pantry wall. It will contain 2 outlets for charging phones and batteries; shelves for said chargables; cubbies for paperwork to be dealt with, scratch paper, etc; a bin for dog stuff (heartworm pills, brush, treats); a calendar inside the door; a bulletin board inside the the door. My goal is to get all that stuff off the kitchen counter (or the desk I have piled high with stuff now).

I think a small shelf will keep things more tidy than a drawer, and I would worry about wear every time the drawer opened and closed.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

I will have outlets in the bottom shelf of 2 upper cabinets in what used to be my old desk area -- along this wall there is a 36" glass cabinet flanked by 2 33" cabinets, each with an outlet. I plan to put chargers for cell phones, etc. in here so they don't clutter the counter.


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Check out Tripp Lite Power strips

You should be able to find something here. They are available from Amazon as well as other places. I have the absolutely awesome 16-outlet Vertical Power Strip with 15-ft. Cord, wall mounted with a shelf below to hold all of the chargeable items.

They have many other styles, some will fit in a drawer. I have used them professionally for years in IT and multimedia installations

Here is a link that might be useful: Tripp Lite


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Having the cord be subject to long term repeating movement is the issue.

Not a lot of cordage is rated for that type of use, and the stuff that is is often not very attractive (hard use cord).

This is one pace to look carefully for a UL label.

This post was edited by brickeyee on Fri, May 17, 13 at 9:43


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

This is how we did ours. We ordered a TR angled plug strip from task lighting. Husband then went to HomeDe** and bought a light hardy but pliable waterproof electric line (see picture). We have had it for two and a half years, it has Never gotten caught up on anything within the cabinetry it is housed. The line moves freely with the drawer when opening and shutting. You do not even know it’s there. Due to what it’s made of the line stays close to the inside wall when the drawer opens and shuts!
 photo 008-1.jpg


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

My electrician said he would not install an outlet inside cabinetry. He does not consider it to be safe.

(sorry jt!) lol


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Snook, Your electrician is right to a point! If not done correctly (like any electric) it could be hazardous. My advice would be (if you are doing a diy) to make sure you confer with a master electrician. Also, have them inspect it when you are done as we did.

Info for your electrician: the TR strip meets 2008 NEC
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• Power source MUST be a 20 amp branch circuit protected by a GFCI at the panel or GFCI prior to the connection at APS ��" TR Series.
• All wiring must meet NEC and local codes. The Angle Power Strip ��" Tamper Resistant Series (APS-TR Series) must be installed by a licensed electrician.
• Use knockout holes for 120v wire entrance. Use listed Romex connectors provided for 120v electrical connections.
• Use tool provided to pry cover open for wiring. (Using other devices may damage the aluminum cover.)
• Field cutting voids warranty.

*Not all electrician are up on this stuff.*

This post was edited by jterrilynn on Fri, May 17, 13 at 13:20


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

I don't really remember all he said, but it wasn't just electrical. He also mentioned people not using them safely. Such as, accidentally leaving a curling iron on in the cabinet. I don't think he liked having the hair dryer in there either, or simply having outlets in an enclosed area with a bunch of stuff.

Nevertheless what I can remember, he is a Master and does not approve or install for various reasons!

I always unplug all appliances when not in use. There have been too many fires from leaving them plugged in.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Yes, I would recommend people Not have a hot plate turned on inside a drawer with a steak sizzling…that could be dangerous! If you do though at least the TR strips are GFCI protected so the power will shut down. I recommend this only as a port station option, I would not stick your head in a drawer and use your hair hot iron while simultaneously doing an electric glue gun project while smoking a cigarette next to a bowl with gasoline.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

I doubt anyone is doing what you suggest, jt, but people do do dumb, careless or forgetful things all the time. If you've ever witnessed a house fire, you would not make fun of it.

Better to err on the side of caution. Electricians are very up on fire safety concerns. I wouldn't. diss their viewpoints or experience on potential hazards, due to electrical or human behavior.

What is NEC on installing them in drawers and cabinets?

And make sure the retractable cord strips and appliances aren't made in China!


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Snookums I’m not dissing hazards but we are talking a cell phone recharge station with all sorts of extra precautions included in the above description. There are house fires from faulty ranges, those little porty broilers and endless plug-in homes appliances ect…I remember a few years ago there was some sort of problem with a certain brand of electric slide-in range catching on fire. We haven’t all stopped using electric ranges in our kitchens, or toasters or toaster ovens/broilers or hand held blenders. Heck I remember the micro above the range controversies where the argument against them was how dangerous they are…and it is a fact that there have been far more documented injuries from bending and removing items from a hot oven. I remodeled my kitchen for two reasons, (one) the builder grade cabinets started falling apart and (two), I was very limited on countertops. I did not want my new countertops cluttered with cell phones plugged in or other junk. I made a space for everything even though I didn’t have a lot of space to spare. My kitchen counters were a junk drop-off point for family members. My sarcasm is a push for people to use common sense with their cell port station.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

If the install is not contrary to code, I would find another electrician.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

>> My electrician said he would not install an outlet inside cabinetry. He does not consider it to be safe.

Mine too.

Actually, to be more specific, he said (trying to remember, this was 5 years ago...) that he would not install an outlet into something moving where someone could not disconnect that power strip from where it is plugged into.

Given my level of fire paranoia, I did not even consider debating this point.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Well if your electrician does not think you can be trusted with a plug (with lots of extra precautions) for your cell phone recharge who am I to argue. I mean he knows you and I don’t. I’m begging you all though please…please consider either going out to eat or have your hot meals delivered to your home. And, don’t, whatever you do have oils, grease or butter in your kitchen. Statistically cooking fires are the leading cause of injuries and DEATH in the kitchen. Do Not have oils; butter ect anywhere near your cooker as they are the first thing to ignite. In fact, since 90% of kitchen fires happen at the range do not have your electrician provide electric there…then you won’t be tempted. Last year alone there were 350 fatalities and near 5,000 injuries caused from cooking and having oils and such ignite. Deaths, fires or injuries from Charging your cell phone 0.

This post was edited by jterrilynn on Sat, May 18, 13 at 11:34


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

JT, I think you miss the point. But if the NEC allows it and it has been installed to code, power to you.

Different strokes. I prefer to listen to my master electrician's good sense and experience (on outlets in cabinetry in general), which was what I was passing along to anyone who was interested.

Having kids or guests around would be a consideration too, I think. I wouldn't want to risk having them leave hair appliances plugged in in the cabinet or something.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Snook, who is missing the point? The topic here is a Power strip for a cell phone charging drawer. You are talking about plugging in hair appliances. Who does their hair in the kitchen? That's gross!


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Here you go on the innocuous cell phones. You are not the only one you have to worry about. China, for instance. Add this to some user manuals in the drawer (or maybe enough heat to burn the wood?) ...

Here is a link that might be useful: Cell Phone Battery Melt Downs


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

So, a bad cell battery did damage to some cell phones in 2003. No mention of fires or fatalities.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

okay. I'm done, it's really not meant to be a rant, but here are a couple others. I actually had some batteries in an alarm clock get very overheated a few months back. Fortunately the clock was in my hand. On snooze, lol!

2012 spontaneous cell phone fire

cell phone fire

This post was edited by snookums2 on Sat, May 18, 13 at 12:14


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

And the point (by my electrician) was putting electrical outlets and appliances in enclosed cabinetry!


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Hmmm, that picture…any chance that human gas’s were responsible for igniting lol? Do not store cell phones near gas hehehehehe!

The danger of owning a stove.
 photo kitchenfire1_zpsddc100f0.jpg

This one included a death.
 photo kitchenfire3_zpsd205fa77.jpg

This post was edited by jterrilynn on Sat, May 18, 13 at 13:21


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

That picture is funny and not funny at the same time. Dangerous. Hope the person was not hurt.

Why do people put cell phones in their pockets then sit on them? There is probably federal grant money out there if someone wants to research this. LOL.

My electrician just put two receptacles in my cabinets. We keep the can opener and toaster in that pantry. Now I will have to ask the electrician about it being unsafe. We keep the doors open, while using them, but anything can catch fire just from the receptacle, I guess.

Thank you both for bringing that to my attention. Maybe you have saved my life. Peke


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

Cell phones are now using USB for charging power

You can get outlets with a built-in USB power output. We're putting one in each bathroom and one in the kitchen, which is where most of the cell phone chargint takes place.

http://pinterest.com/pin/210754457533908839/


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

The hazard is from a section of cordage that is not completely visible easily, moves very frequently, and may be exposed to things like getting pinched by drawer guides, or repeated rubbing on edges (of drawers, guides, etc.) in the same spot.

An arc fault breaker would be a good idea if you want to take a chance on something like this.

You also have to keep in mind that all those transformers (and some are actually power supplies) dissipate power and being in a confined space may get warmer than designed.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

We had our cell phone charging station in a drawer with an extension going out the back (like pictured above) until the last time this discussion came up, and the arguments made against it were enough to make me rethink the value of having charging phones hidden in a drawer, and DH removed the charging station and we moved it elsewhere. Not worth the risk.

Thanks to those (brickeyee and all) who have repeatedly make the same point over and over, it takes some of us a few times of hearing it to process it fully and act on it (I speak for myself): "The hazard is from a section of cordage that is not completely visible easily, moves very frequently, and may be exposed to things like getting pinched by drawer guides, or repeated rubbing on edges (of drawers, guides, etc.) in the same spot"


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

That was another reason I wanted direct wire in cabinet and under cabinet lights. No power transformer in enclosed cabinet.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

I am with those who would not want these items in a drawer. The cord would be too easy to damage as the drawer was opened and closed repeatedly.

In the kitchen, I'd consider a small shelf under a cabinet upon which the phone could rest near an outlet. Though, personally, I'd rather have a spot close to the kitchen but not IN the kitchen -- don't we have enough clutter there already?
In the bedroom, I like the idea of an outlet set just about the height of the nightstand so it'd be easy to reach.


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RE: Power strip for charging drawer

The moral of this story is… If anyone does decide to do a drawer cell phone port please follow these guidelines. Check out the TR strips from Task Lighting the TR strip meets 2008 NEC. They have a few colors and sizes, you can also order special sizes.
 photo TRplugstrip_zpsf2c6ddba.jpg
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• Power source MUST be a 20 amp branch circuit protected by a GFCI at the panel or GFCI prior to the connection at APS-" TR Series.
• All wiring must meet NEC and local codes. The Angle Power Strip -" Tamper Resistant Series (APS-TR Series) must be installed by a licensed electrician.
• Use knockout holes for 120v wire entrance. Use listed Romex connectors provided for 120v electrical connections.
• Use tool provided to pry cover open for wiring. (Using other devices may damage the aluminum cover.)
• Field cutting voids warranty.

Also, since it’s in the kitchen as an extra precaution I would suggest a thick-ish rubber coated electric cable be used. This type of line is flexi enough to move back and forth with the drawer but is heavy enough that it stays against the back of the cabinet. If you do not make an entry for your line near a drawer slide you will not have any problems. I’m not sure why people would do that anyway. If you are still unsure I think once you actually see and feel the waterproof cable you will be confident in your project.
 photo rubber_cables_zps2505149e.jpg

This post was edited by jterrilynn on Sat, May 18, 13 at 23:20


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