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Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Posted by karin_mt (My Page) on
Sat, May 25, 13 at 9:51

This is round three of the Great Rocks Thread! It appears we at GW have a large appetite for discussing and sharing pictures of rocks.

Please post your rock questions here. I've copied the first post from Rocks 102 here to lay the foundation.

Quartzite and marble are hopelessly (deliberately?) mixed up in the decorative stone industry. My point, aside from just loving rocks, is to help folks learn how to tell the difference between the two so you are not at the mercy of a sales rep when a multi-thousand dollar purchase hangs in the balance.

Quartzite is much harder than marble and will not etch when exposed to acids. You can tell the difference between quartzite and marble by doing the scratch test.

Take a glass bottle or a glass tile with you when you go stone shopping. (Glass tile idea is courtesy of MaggiePie11, what a good idea!) Find a rough, sharp edge of the stone. Drag the glass over the edge of the stone. Press pretty hard. Try to scratch the glass with the stone.

Quartzite will bite right into the glass and will leave a big scratch mark.
Any feldspar will do the same. (Granites are made mostly of feldspar)

Calcite and dolomite (that's what marble and limestone are made of) will not scratch. In fact you will be able to feel in your hand that the rock won't bite into the glass. It feels slippery, no matter how hard you press.

PS - don't press so hard that you risk breaking the glass in your hand. You shouldn't need to press that hard!

For reference, here are links to the other rock threads, in which many types of rocks have been discussed. If you read through both of these threads you will earn an honorary degree in Kitchen Geology.

Rocks 101: The Lowdown on Super White.

Rocks 102: Marble, Quartzite and Other Rocks in the Kitchen.

With that, let the rock conversations continue!
-Karin


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I'm still a few months away from decision time, and I'm sure I'll have more questions at that point, but I just wanted to chime in to thank you for sharing your wonderful knowledge and such good information with all of us! It is very much appreciated!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin,

I should be making burgers, but instead I have just read all your prior posts:-) Thank you so much for all this valuable information!!! Did you say you went to HS in NJ? So did I, Freehold Township. My HS boyfriend majored in Geology in college. He went to Trenton State (at the time).

Do you recommend sealing quartzite? This is my Sea Pearl. My fabricator says there is a new sealant that seals for a lifetime. One of your posts talks about chemicals getting into food. I will have to ask about this.

Thanks for your thoughts!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thanks for answering. This area of PA has blue-gray to gray-black, just like the old chalkboards. I believe I will ask for a sample and a price. The company in Pen Argyl seems helpful. If you check the website, www.structuralslate.com, it gives information on the structure of slate.

I am afraid the cost of shipping and fabrication would be higher than what I anticipate. The Blue Pearl is $59 pr sq. ft. Much cheaper than Antarctica and Black Cambrian granite.

I read that the "black granites" are hard enough that a sealer is not necessary and may, in fact, cause hazing and streaking. Anyone have Blue Pearl honed or shiny?


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Found this one called Black Fantasy while looking for our slab of Super White...


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

And here is the slab of Super White... I am hoping it is true Quartzite, but if not then oh well. I still love and will deal with the etching. I found a piece on the floor below our slab and it scratched glass, so here is to hoping it is!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Wow I LOVE that black fantasy!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Joan, sealing has nothing to do with hardness. Whether rock needs it depends on the porosity of the rock (i.e. whether it had microscopic pores that let water and other liquids in).

Quatzites vary a lot in porosity - it depends on how the material of the rock was formed rather than what it is made of. Liquids didn't stain our unsealed samples, but some other quartzites are pretty porous and need sealing. Our fabricator sealed ours when he put it in even though I don't think it needed it based on the sample I tested. It's been over 6 years and we haven't resealed.

The sealant is applied to the surface and any excess that doesn't absorb in should be wiped away. Once it has dried and is sitting in the pores, I'm not worried about it getting into food.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

This is my puppy named Feldspar. Everyone is confused by his name- but maybe not on this thread! He is sitting next to my aqua grantique countertop.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

We're looking at countertops for a new build, and have decided on Aqua Grantique for our kitchen. I've loved it since first seeing niffy's countertop on GW - plus, as we live in central WI, it's a local product for us.

We're considering another local product, Cambrian Cream, for 1 or 2 of our bathroom vanities. It's labeled a quartzite sandstone, and has the following specifications (which I was hoping Karin could help interpret):

Dry Density 158.7 pcf
Bulk Specific Gravity 2.54
Absorption 0.5%
Modulus of Rupture 1,850 psi
Compressive Strength 17,700 psi
Freeze-Thaw Weight Loss <0.5%
Abrasion Resistance 63.8
Mohs Hardness 6-7

CHEMICAL PROPERTIES:
Silicon Dioxide 98.94%

It doesn't have the 0% Absorption of Aqua Grantique, but would this be a reasonable choice for a (lightly used) bathroom vanity?

Thanks in advance!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Wow, lots of traffic today, nice!

Mommytoc, that Cambrian Cream sandstone would be fine for a bathroom vanity. It couldn't hurt to do the scratch test because from 10 feet away the rock also looks like limestone. Absorption of 0.5% is what you'd expect for a quartzite, and that is fine. It will need sealing, but no worries. Bonus points for using a local product, that's fantastic!

Aqua Grantique is neat looking and I like that it is not your run-of-the-mill granite.

J_hack - very cool slabs, both of them. Black Fantasy belongs on a conference room table of the evil mastermind character in a corporate espionage movie, don't you think? Fingers crossed for your Super White being quartzite, but it sounds like you are level-headed about it either way.

Joan, fellow Jersey Girl! I went to HS in Rumson, so we were nearly neighbors. I took a high school geology class which is what got me started in this field. I don't have ties to NJ anymore, but I think I have become too much of a country girl to feel at home there anymore.

As Cloud Swift says, quartzite can be a bit porous so yes, I would probably recommend a sealer. I have not gotten around to looking up the chemical composition of sealers, but it's not a bad idea in my opinion. The fabricator can give you the MSDS (material safety data sheet) on the product or you can look it up on line. Agreed that once the product dries it most likely does not interact with your food, but still, it would be interesting to at least know what is in it.

Karen_Ohio, I have heard that same thing about the black "granites," especially Absolute Black. But aside from reading about that, I really don't know. AB and Blue Pearl are not less porous than many other rocks, so I don't get why it's a particular problem with that rock. Perhaps the dark color makes the imperfections stand out more? I don't know, sorry!

Niffy - Feldspar the dog, really? In a stir fry pan? On a granite countertop? One couldn't ask for a more apropos photo for this thread. Nicely done!

Thanks for the props - I really have been enjoying the rock Q&A over the months, and I have learned quite a lot about countertops in the process!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin... I agree on the evil mastermind table! When I first looked at it it seemed so dark, but I bet it would look great with white or gray(ish) counters. It was leathered and I kept wanting to touch it! It was just gorgeous.

I like walking around the yards looking also. My wife wants to get in and out. I just wandered off. She will find me eventually! ;-)

Regarding our slab, we (I) considered marble, but was just to concerned with chipping more than anything else. My daughter is 7 and I am sure as she gets older she will be more involved as I start teaching her to cook and I am sure she will not be quite as cautious as myself. In the end if we have a dolomitic marble, thats ok. I will just make sure not to point out any flaws or issues to my wife. We had a chip in our granite at our old house and she never knew. So should be just fine as I do all the cooking anyways.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

J Hack,

Oh I agree that wandering the slab yard is the only way to go. When I was initially looking for remnant slabs for our kitchen I went by myself on a day the yard was closed (but one could still walk through the gate and wander around). That way I could dawdle as long as I cared to without bothering anyone. It was a nice way to really look at everything. Then the miracle was when I went back with DH and showed him my favorite, he really liked it too, phew!

I love marble, dolomitic marble, etc. I pause and swoon every time I see it. Good for you to know yourself and your family well enough to make a peaceful decision. Dolomitic marble is only the tiniest bit harder than regular marble, so it won't behave much differently. But it sounds like you know what you are getting into. Besides, that sample you checked was promising, so maybe you have actual quartzite on your hands.

I looked at photos of Black Fantasy, and that slab you saw is really a special one. The photos I saw looked a lot less dramatic - not up to snuff for an evildoer. ;)

Karin


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I am not a lavender person, but .........

Wow! Arcobaleno quartzite.

If this stone was anywhere near me I would buy it even if I had to sell my husband to afford it. Road trip? I wish I could bring it home on a trailer. I would be on the road today.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Dolce vita quartzite


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I found a sea pearl that is close to the size I need. I would have to cut my island dimensions down to 4' x 8'. I was thinking of making it 5' x 8'. I wouldn't need to buy two stones. This is why my island is not designed or built yet.

The bottom four feet would be the island top.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

To me it almost looks like smoke rolling across a black sky. Gorgeous for sure. I keep trying to think of other ways to incorporate other stones. I read in another thread about finding an old/antique table and adding a new stone to top it. I may end up doing this and using it in my foyer as the catch-all for keys and mail and such.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Blue imperial


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Dali's nightmare...as in Salvador Dali.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Dali's Dream


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Silver Falcon


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

That's an interesting array of slabs, Peke. Hands down I like Sea Pearl the best of all of these. The brightly colored ones don't do much for me and in some cases they are dyed, so to me they look fake. Sea Pearl is wonderful though, and it sounds like you are getting closer. I hope it works out for you to get the slab you want.

J-Hack, I agree with you about wanting to use small sections of really cool slabs. Keep your eye on the remnant pile at your slab yard - often there are coffee-table-sized pieces left over that are just calling to be used like that. There is a rock called stretched pebble conglomerate that I can't think of any use for, but I just want it! There's a rectangle of it at our stone yard that calls my name every time I walk past.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

" . . . in some cases they are dyed . . ."

Please do clarify. I heard this once about a blue sodalite and then never again. How do you know they are dyed?


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

J hack, I want to do the same thing.

Karin, I didn't know that they could dye them. I bet the Arcobaleno is dyed then. It is just so pretty. I loved the blue-green color. My new slab store is going to take my Sea Pearl out in the sunlight so I can see the actual color. I hope it has a touch of green in it like Flevy's or pale blue.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

For anyone near Tulsa, Oklahoma who is wanting Soapstone, this is the most beautiful piece I have ever seen.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin,

Have you looked at the website for slate that I posted? I know you would understand the chart!

I wish I had studied geology in college. I have always liked rocks. Oh well, hindsight is 20-20.

I am looking for someone who has seen leathered Blue Pearl. Maybe that would satisfy my craving for slate. Yes, I know they don't look anything alike, but soapstone is too soft for me (love its look).


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I'm so grateful for this and the earlier threads! Thank you Karin, and thanks to all who have posted the questions and pictures!
I've been thinking I wanted soapstone for the matte finish, and so that chemical sealer isn't necessary. People who have it seem to love it. Many of you are posting pictures of slabs that may be good alternatives. I'm open to using one rock for my island 60" x 90"), and something else for the perimeter counters. Sea Pearl looks promising, as do many of the white quartzites. I can't wait to see Peke's final selection!

Karin, in addition to the etch and scratch tests, is there a test for porosity? I'd really like to have a non-shiny, durable, non-reactive rock in the white/gray/black families that won't stain...do you have a list of candidates?


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Kitchendetective,

Blue rocks are pretty rare, and a blue quartzite would definitely be unusual. A rock can get its color from the minerals in it or from the cement that binds the minerals together. There are blue minerals (such as the feldspar in Blue Pearl) but I can't think of any blue cements. And quartz isn't blue - quartz can be lots of colors due to trace amounts of different ions, but as far as I know there is not a blue variant. So that's a long way of saying that I can't think of how you'd get a blue quartzite. I'm sure there are examples of it somewhere, but it would be rare. Especially that royal blue color - that always looks fake to me. You can buy royal blue crystals and whatnot at gift shops for $1 and they are definitely dyed.

Karen.Ohio,

Yes, I looked at the slate website. I'm not conversant in many of the numbers and specs that are used to describe rocks for building purposes, but nothing looks out of place to me. The rock is made of quartz and clay minerals. The quartz makes it nice and strong and the clay minerals give it a dark color. I was hoping for more photos on the site though, so that we could see more examples of how it looks. Have you looked at honed Jet Mist/Virginia Mist? That is a granite that is commonly used as a soapstone alternative.

KKsMama,

You can test porosity by dropping water on a slab and seeing how quickly it is absorbed. The absorption rate is listed for most rocks, so I'd think the sales people could tell you the number. But most rocks are sealed, which reduces the porosity on the surface. To meet your wish list for a rock, I might suggest River White, Alaska White and the like. Actually anything in the granite family (meaning igneous rocks) will fit those criteria in the white/grey/black color range.

I've included a link below that gives the porosity and other info for a whole bunch of rocks. This site covers both granites and marbles - plenty of good info to be found.

Here is a link that might be useful: Granite specs


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

My new counter top......is plywood. LOL Does anyone have a "bedazzler". I can add some bling to the plywood.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi Karin

Thanks so much for sharing all your rock wisdom with the group! I am heading to the fabricator's tomorrow to lay out our perimeter and island counters on our soapstone. At the stone yard it was called Vineyard Green, but I haven't found much out about it other than that.

Is there anything I should be aware of when doing the layout other than just how it looks? The veiny areas have a bit of glassy appearance, so I'm guessing it might be a different mineral mixed in? Here's the best closer up pic I have, realize now I don't have a good closeup of the "veiny-est" area...

I'd be curious to know what kind of rock the veiny areas are. Most other pictures of soapstone I've seen have thin white veins, rather than these glassy ones. I hope this is really soapstone--though now that I've chosen it, it feels like my baby and so I'll love it no matter what it is. :)
Should we avoid having the really veiny areas as edges or on a seam? (I'm hoping to avoid a seam, but won't know for sure until we see how it lays out.) And what about runnels? Would the different texture of the veiny areas not be good for the area next to the sink where we're thinking of putting those?
Can you tell I'm nervous now that they're going to cut it?! Thanks in advance for any thoughts!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi Beth,

Yes, you are exactly right that the light colored veins are a different mineral. The question is what kind of mineral? It may be something that is more durable than the talc that the rest of the rock is made out of. Or it might be calcite which is harder but is also reactive with acids (limestone and marble are made of calcite). It's hard to say since soapstone is one of those rocks that can have a range of minerals, many of which can be more than one color.

Here's what I would do: Find a part of the rock that has prominent veins, and use the tip of a knife blade or a sturdy thumbtack and try to scratch it. Then do the same to the green part of the rock. That will tell you if the white part is harder or softer.

Next I would drip a bit of vinegar on both the green and white parts of the rock. You might also want to try scratching the rock first, and then putting white vinegar on the scratched part. That's the test for dolomite, which only reacts where the rock has been scratched first. The reaction you are looking for is the appearance of small bubbles. Sometimes you see bubbles within a larger drop of vinegar and sometimes you see fizzing on the rock itself. Anyway, that will tell you if the veins are made of calcite or dolomite.

If these tests indicate that the veins are soft or are reactive to acids, then yes, you will want to plan accordingly. But they may turn out to be stronger than the rest of the rock in which case you don't need to worry at all. Hopefully your fabricator won't mind you doing a little CSI action on the slab!

Good luck! It's a beautiful stone!

Here is a link that might be useful: all about soapstone


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thank you for that explanation about "the Blues."


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

@niffy -- I want that puppy!!!! :)


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke: do the Sea Pearl! Love it!!!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke: do the Sea Pearl! Love it!!!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karen Ohio - what are you looking for? I have blue pearl polished.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi,

I have a couple of questions for the rock experts! Immediately after our counters were installed, the installer turned to me and said, they told you that this is really thirsty granite, right? Nope. Ooops. Apparently, we have really porous granite (it's called Snowflake).

I have since performed the lemon test and it passed with no issues. I also did the scratch test and it "scratched" the glass, but then I was able to wipe off the residue and the glass was unharmed, so I don't know if that counts as a pass or a fail. Thoughts?

We took it for a test run this weekend and despite being sealed, it absorbs water like crazy and it stained in a few places food/oil wasn't wiped up quickly. The water dries and fades relatively quicky. The other stains seem to be evaporating, but it's taking several days. I am mentally having issues coping with the staining (frankly, I could have lived with etching, but not staining). Do you think resealing will help? Any preferences? I'm thinking Dupont Bulletproof or 511 Porous Plus.

Also, I've read about a couple of grease poultices - Dawn + flour or acetone. Has anyone had experience with these? Are they effective? Can they harm the stone?

I know I should have done this BEFORE the counters went in, but what's done is done and now I want to figure out a way to live peacefully with them. TIA!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Deb52899, thanks for asking. How do you like your Blue Pearl? Is it in the kitchen? We have a small piece in a bathroom that seems to be holding up well. Soon we are going to strip the kitchen for a remodel. I had my heart on different countertop stone, but Blue Pearl is probably going to be the one I settle for. I would like to use something less flashy for the counter on the wall and polished on the island, I am a plain Jane kind of girl, so I was wondering if anyone has seen or used a honed Blue Pearl granite.

Karin-MT here is another Penn Slate website: www.pennbigbedslate.com

Everyone who posted pics, it helps a lot to see the different stones!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin,

Thanks for the tips! The veins seem to be of the same amount of hardness as the rest of the stone (it is soapstone, so I can scratch it, but it seems to be harder than other varieties-- I got samples from other places before we selected this slab). I wasn't brave enough to take vinegar to the stone yard and test it out with everyone watching! But, I will try that in an inconspicuous place once we get it installed, so I'll know if we need to be careful about that in the future. Thanks again!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

new_2_nj - I'm not the geologist, but my granite fabricator did recommend one of those lifetime sealers. He didn't do it himself- he gave me a guy's card - but he said he saw it at a trade show, and it was good. He had it on one of the display counters in his showroom. It was called Tekon. I didn't do it, although I'm still thinking about it. He said it probably would have been about $200 for my small kitchen. Maybe something like that would work for you. You could call the fabricator and ask about lifetime sealers.

My fabricator did say that mine was somewhat porous granite, that's why he recommended the lifetime stuff, but I have had no problems at all, and it's been in for 20 months. I really should have resealed by now. I'm surprised yours is absorbing even with a sealer.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Feldspar, you can come live with me! She/he is going to burn its little bum in that wok. 😁.

I had 8 dogs on Monday. My four dogs, sister in laws two, her dad's one, her sister's one. They had a funeral to go to.

Oh geez! I think there is a pool going about which slab I will pick. That is so sad. I will make up my mind...probably the Sea Pearl. Wish I could find a larger piece.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

New 2 NJ,

Yes, this sounds like a straightforward sealer issue as Ginny mentioned. Your stone might need several coats. The sealer really should work though, and I'd expect that will solve your staining problems. I don't think you necessarily need a "lifetime" sealer, because you can also use multiple coats of a regular sealer. But either way will probably work.

Karen,

Beautiful photos from that slate website! The deep sheen (but not shine) on the countertops is beautiful. So, why settle for Blue Pearl? If you'd like something else, why not get something else? There are so many colors, patterns and styles available I don't think there is any reason to resign yourself to a stone that you're not psyched about.

Peke,

Put me down for $20 that you will do Sea Pearl. I mean, if we're going to make a pool, we may as well make it count for something! :)


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karen Ohio - I sent you an email through Garden Web. It doesn't show me your email address, so if you will respond, I'll send you pictures of my blue pearl.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin_Mt

I guess settle is not the correct word. I really do like Blue Pearl.

We were all set to get Brown Shada and Cambrian Black leathered. The Brown Shada is a beautiful stone with a lot of reflective blue; however, the sample showed us that it needs a lot of light to make all that color pop. The Blue Pearl reflects, even in low light. The Black Cambrian is $138 per sq. ft. in our area. Blue Pearl is $55. We did not ask about Brown Shada. Antarctica is over $100 per sq ft and Mystery White Marble, which is very hard for a marble, is a letter V on the cost scale. V means very expensive!

So, my taste runs all over the place. I have priced pattern slate, 1/4" thick at Penn Big Bed Slate for our entry. The slate is cost effective, but the freight is twice the cost of slate. Cough, cough, don't think counter is in the cards. I have a feeling our electric and heating segment will eat up a lot of the budget. I AM GOING TO GET THE AMERICAN SLATE for the entry. Stay tuned...


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin, it is possible that I could lose my own "pool".

Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karen, that makes sense when you put it like that. Blue Pearl is a pretty one and it does have a lot of brightness to it for a darker stone. I'm glad you still have your eye on some slate for another part of your house - it is too nice to pass up! I think it would be gorgeous for a patio, sidewalk or dry-stacked stone wall too.

Peke, now you'll have to figure in the price of losing the pool into the price of your stone. :)


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

What breed of dog is Feldspar?

Feldspar, come home with me, you will be the only one and have all the attention.

I put my bet on Sea Pearl. Peke, remember you don't want to have too many stripe patterns...LOL!

This post was edited by azmom on Fri, May 31, 13 at 11:13


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Feldspar is a little red and white shih tzu pup:). He has a "sister" named Strudel-different breeder/litter. They are only a month apart in age and barrels (woks?) of fun.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

niffy,

Thank you so much for the info. Fedspar is so adorable, believe his sister is too. You are so very lucky to have a pair of joy!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thank you Karin and all! I just finished reading all three threads. It has been incredibly helpful - I am just getting ready to start my search - I hope it doesn't take too long or I may wind up with plywood countertops for a while. :). I put my toe in the water this week but didn't really get a chance to explore the varieties available. Do any of you know of a good supplier in CT? (Or one I should stay away from!).

I have been researching soapstone - I like the look and have friends who LOVE theirs. However, I am so enthralled with all of the different slabs I have seen! I may fall in love with a granite or quartzite in the neutral zone. Some have a lot of yellow/gold which I am not crazy about - but some of the cream/browns are spectacular!

I will be sure to arm myself with a glass tile before my next outing!

 photo image_zpsef696568.jpg

 photo image_zps5d7d0383.jpg

I found this one fascinating - they said it was a natural stone - but it looks man-made? I wouldn't use it for a kitchen - but a real curiosity. Is this the type of thing you mentioned earlier Karin?

 photo image_zps9c372c0b.jpg

Thank you for the Rockin' Education! Rock-on! :)


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I've been helping my daughter study for her Earth Science Regents, so I'll take a stab at this one. That third one isn't man-made, it's a sedimentary stone called conglomerate.

There are man-made conglomerates where they embed geodes in some kind of synthetic and then slice it into slabs, but that's different. That one looks like nature-made conglomerate. I love that stuff.

Do I pass, Karin?

And are those garnets in that Andromeda White? that's a lovely slab.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Deb love your photos!

Karin. Good ideas! We did have a stacked slate wall at our house in Schnecksville, PA. Husband stopped at a house one day and asked the guy what he was going to do with the slate in his driveway. Man said if you have a way to get it home, you can have it! Literally ran home, took the Suburban out of the garage and went back for it.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

WhooHOO Ginny! Nice work, you nailed it.

Follow up question: Do you know how/where conglomerate forms?

Thanks Animacafe for the inspiring slabs to ponder. We'll look forward to hearing how your search unfolds. Should we place bets if Animacafe obtains a slab before Peke does?

Karin.Ohio, what an awesome score to get some free slate. I only wish stuff like that would happen to me. I am always wanting for landscaping rocks.

Here's my current rock wall in progress. Just finished the main portion of it last weekend!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin, your wall is lovely!
Who is our bookie? I'll take Animacafe and give 11 days just to make it interesting.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin
Puddingstone in Michigan is a Glacial conglomerate found containing Jasper around Drummond Island and Lake Huron.

Anyone know why it is called Puddingstone?

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I hadn't heard of this one, but thanks to Wikipedia I learned that puddingstone is a term applied to lots of different conglomerates.

"The rounded pebbles and the sharp contrast in color gives this type of conglomerate the appearance of a raisin or Christmas pudding."

Cool!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Wow, found this site again after a couple of years, I used to join in for the crafting but life got busy. We are midway through a full house gut and just choosing our rock so this has been a fantastic resource, thanks everyone!

We had originally choose Milky Way granite, antiqued and due to our indecision lost one of the three slabs we needed for the project. However maybe it's for the best! On our first few visits to the yard my husband was eying up the 1 slab in stock of Cosmic Black, absolutely beautiful but only 1 and it was very busy to me, too much movement I felt. Since then 12 consecutive slabs arrived for a customer to pick 7. The ones she left behind are beautiful, lots of interest but more sedated than the original we saw.

The samples, (12x12! ) , which they gave me are a polished and and an antiqued. We are not a fan of polished and the antiquing is very pronounced on the Cosmic vrs the Milky Way so they are doing a honed sample which will be ready on Tuesday, this is a great yard to work with, very knowledgable and customer service orientated, been around for 30 plus years!

Does anyone have any input on the Cosmic, good or bad. It doesn't seem to absorb either oils or water and the polished is very smooth, no ridges between the different minerals I felt with some others.

Thanks again everyone for all the great forums, lots of reading to do!

This post was edited by countrycrafter on Sun, Jun 2, 13 at 23:05


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi Country Crafter, welcome back to GW!

I looked at photos of Cosmic Black and Milky Way - they are similar. From the point of view of the rock, I wouldn't foresee any troubles with these rocks. They are super durable metamorphic rocks made of nice hard minerals. I like the little pockets of white, which are most likely quartz.

Enjoy your shopping - it is lots of fun, isn't it? Especially since it sounds like you have an excellent rock yard. Lucky you!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

karin, I don't know how conglomerate forms, but I would have guessed glacial. You'd need a way for stones to get moved into a place and surrounded by something, probably something wet, that filled in all the spaces. And they're all rounded. So I would imagine that they would be glacial debris, rounded by moving along, and at some point - the glacier melts? - they get dumped and surrounded by sediment. Millions of years later, conglomerate.

But Upstate is glacier central - drumlins, eskers, moraines, kettle holes, Finger Lakes - so I tend to always think in terms of glaciers.

Is breccia formed differently? If breccia has sharp-edged stones, they wouldn't likely be glacial debris.

DD is doing her Earth Science Regents Lab Practical in school today. She'll need to classify two rocks (as sed, ig or meta) and identify a mineral using the reference table. We spent time this weekend trying to identify rocks in the yard and scratching an empty bottle to test hardness. Our conclusion: there are a lot of sedimentary stones, mostly limestone, shale, and sandstone, in our area.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karen Ohio - I sent you quite a few pictures. I hope they went through.

Karin - your wall is beautiful (and huge)!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karen, of course there are blue quartzites. You've seen pictures of my own Azul do Mar - and I know that isn't dyed because the color goes all the way through the slab.

Blue Louis / Van Gogh (which looks similar to the "Dali's Dream" above) and Azul Macaubas (which is similar to the Azul Imperial slab above except it is usually just white and aqua blue) are other examples of blue quartzites.

One of our quartzite slabs:
 photo HPIM0754.jpg

On the island:
 photo HPIM1162.jpg


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Ha! DD came home and said she got conglomerate as one of the rocks on her lab practical.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thank you Karin for the response, I was feeling pretty comfortable with our choice and its nice to have it confirmed.

This thread, all three, and so many others are full of great info and its wonderful to have such knowledgable people participate, kudos to you all!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Ginny,

You sound like the ideal, supportive Mom to help your daughter learn. Nice going! You are correct about how conglomerate forms - actually it can be any environment that rolls the pebbles around sufficiently to make them round. Usually this involves running water (for quite a long time) and places like riverbeds and beaches. In a glacial setting you'll find rounded pebbles in the outwash streams that flow out from the toe of the ice.

Breccia, with its angular fragments, often forms in places where the rocks do not get carried very far or there is not much running water to round them off. So breccia forms in landslides, scree piles and alluvial fans. Breccia also forms "in place" where the rock gets fractured all to bits ("brecciated") and then gets re-cemented. That's how a lot of the Super White slabs are.

Fingers crossed that your daughter was successful in her exam today.

Cloud Swift you are right. I should have been more specific about the blueness I was referring to. The Azul Macaubus reminds me of the rocks that are dyed. When you see the very same rock available in some neutral color plus a vivid blue color, it's a good bet the blue version is dyed. What I meant in my original explanation is that royal blue/cobalt color is the shade that is rare in large quantities. I can't speak to that particular example of course, but as a consumer I would be a bit skeptical of a color that bright in such large quantities.

On the other hand, rocks like yours and the Van Gogh that are a greyer blue or are blue mixed with other colors are natural. To my eye, that is a much more believable blue and for that reason it's much more attractive.

This post was edited by karin_mt on Mon, Jun 3, 13 at 20:00


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin, the blue in Azul Macaubus is more of an aqua blue similar to some of the blues in my stone. I wouldn't call it cobalt or royal blue.

Both come from around the same region in Brazil. There have been people on the kitchen forum who have used Azul Macaubas and the blue carries around the edges of the counters which dye wouldn't (unless you think the fabricator dyed the edges to match after fabricating the counters - I don't think they could).

If stone was dyed, after fabrication, the edges wouldn't match. Therefore, the Azul Macaubas is a natural though striking color.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I have $20 on animacafe too. Wait... LOL

Latest...cabinet maker has taken 5 other jobs. So my little island is on hold while my sea pearl sits waiting for someone else to buy it.

Don't bet on me. Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I have really enjoyed all three threads and all of the information. I love rocks! Now I'd like to get advice on using rainbow sandstone in a bathroom. I saw an earlier GW thread on using it in a kitchen, but it didn't look like anyone actually had it installed. I think it is too porous for a kitchen, but am on the fence about using it as a bathroom counter.

DH and I have been planning addition which includes a new kitchen, dinning room, master bath, master bedroom, walk-in closet and tons of storage, something our 1952 house really lacks. While we are just getting the contracts signed and the permits pulled, I have been researching all kinds of things for the kitchen, including granite countertops and some kind of countertop material for both bathrooms. The sink in what is now the main bathroom has to be replaced, which means removing all of the 1950s tile on the counter too.

We have visited a local granite place and looked at slabs to get an idea of costs and so on. Of course, what I like best is in the high end and exotics price ranges that we can't afford. While looking around, we saw some slabs of rainbow sandstone on sale and I fell in love with the color variation which perfectly coordinate with the remaining 1950s tile in the main bathroom, and would look great in the new master bath. Plus it is on sale which makes it harder to pass up.

I know that sandstone is more porous and possibly harder to clean than granite. I definitely don't want it for the kitchen. The owner of the stone yard gave me a small chunk to bring home and to experiment with--part of it is sealed, part of it isn't. I've been dabbing all kind of lotions, toothpaste, hand creams, and other potential bathroom products of doom. Even cat spit, one of our cats loves to lick the unsealed part. LOL! So far, the worst stain came from some antibiotic ointment, but it isn't as noticeable on the sealed portion as it is on the unsealed.

We will be going back in a couple of weeks to pick out the stone for all of our countertops. I have a pretty good idea of what granite we'll get for the kitchen. The owner does a lot of business with our builder, so they are willing to hold it until we are ready to install. I don't want to let sandstone love lead me down the garden path, so I'd appreciate any input using sandstone for countertops.. Otherwise, I'll look at granite remnants since neither countertop is particularly long.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Cloud Swift, thank you for the additional info on Azul Macaubus - both regarding the color IRL and the results of people using it. Now I'm super curious about the mineralogy of that stone. The blue is in the cement, not the quartz grains, and I'll have to ponder the chemistry at work there. Very cool though, thank you!

Aamich, welcome. It sounds like you have a huge project on your hands, exciting! Sandstones can be porous but not all of them are. So when you put water drops on the sandstone, both the sealed and unsealed part, what happens? Basically that will tell you about the porosity of the rock. If water soaks right in, I'd probably shy away from it. But if water beads and sits on the surface, then it might be OK.

If it does turn out to be porous I'd just go with something else. You may be able to live with it over time but it reminds me of a big shrub that is planted in a small space. You can get it to work, but it always requires maintenance and attending to.

Remnants are a nice choice because they are good and cheap! And personally, I like remnants because it's a less resource-intensive route to take compared to using a fresh slab.

Let us know what your water drop test reveals.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thank Karin,

The water drop test is promising. The drops were immediately absorbed into the unsealed portion but are still beaded on the sealed part after about 20 minutes. I think there is only one coat of sealer too. So maybe this will work out after all, at least in what will become the guest bathroom. I think I'm willing to maintain it, it is so beautiful.

We do have a huge project ahead. 6 months of chaos. I can't wait for the results. I'm sure I'll be posting aplenty as things progress.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Cloud, I think you have the prettiest Azul that I have ever seen. The ones I have seen in person look nothing like yours. I love aqua blues. Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Good work - it sounds like you have your answer. The beading water is an excellent sign and if you are willing to keep an eye on it and re-seal from time to time then you can probably pull it off.

Interesting that the sealer is that effective and that water soaked right into the unsealed part yet beaded up with the sealer. Good to know!

I hope your remodel goes smoothly - looking forward to your updates.

Karin


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke--can't you put a hold on your Sea Pearl? It's so beautiful? If not sea pearl is the volga still in the running. Mine makes me smile every time I go in the kitchen. You can't go wrong with either choice, but they are so different. I'm still glad I never saw that sea pearl--It would have been a contender for sure.

$20 on sea pearl for me too---good luck with bedazzling your plywood!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin - can you check into that azul macaubus, because that is my all time favorite stone! I was thinking of using it in our master bath (because I only discovered it part way through kitchen and kitchen is done now). Cloud Swift's blue looks aqua/teal to me and the azul macaubus I've seen is definitely royal/cobalt. I wouldn't choose it if it had an aqua look. The pieces I saw in person where the royal/cobalt and white/gray. Is this stone quartzite, marble or granite? Thanks!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Deb - Our stone and the Azul Macaubas (I'm not sure which you were asking about) is quartzite - They drilled our faucet holes on site and had to keep stopping to let the bit cool down because it is so hard.

The Azul Macaubas I saw at around the same time we were finding our slabs had blues very similar to those in our slabs. Our stone has a range of blue colors in it. There are even a couple of small green areas. The blues range from aqua to closer to royal blue (perhaps where there are some grey elements mixed in with the blue). There is even a kind of lavenderish color "stream" going diagonally across the bottom left side of the slab pictured above. We put that on the corner of our island and part of our backsplash to feature it.

Peke - we were extremely fortunate. The first slabs of this that we saw were tiny. We would have had to have had at least 2 and probably 3 seams in our L and one in our island. Only one other yard in town, Bedrosians, carried Azul do Mar (out of around a dozen or more stone yards) and they had slabs that were big enough to do the island in one slab but probably still two seams in the L. The best of those slabs had a hold and most of the others had a large rust colored area that we would want to avoid.

Bedrosians checked with their other yards, found a lot with larger slabs and had it transferred about 100 miles to the local yard. The were perfect for our job. All the Azul do Mar slabs we saw had very similar coloration except for the rust area.

I've been told that the supply of some stones tends to be seasonal - the explanation we were give is that there are times of the year when they can't work some of the quarries due to weather.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thanks Cloud Swift for the extra info. The only thing I can add for Deb is that aside from general info about the stone, the most important thing for you to do is find and test the slabs you can see locally.

I enjoy digging around for info about various types of stones, but I have to say the availability of info is generally poor. All I can really do is scour through Google images and discern what I can about the rock's mineralogy. So aside from the generalized advice I can offer, the rest is up to you as you do your shopping. This is an interesting stone so keep us updated!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Blues are at the top of my list for the kitchen. Peke, if I could get that Blue Imperial locally, I would be in heaven. My stone yard carries Blue Pearl which is out of my price range and Volga Blue which is the one I'm leaning toward. What is interesting is that some of the slabs had a very dark, almost cobalt blue, while in others, the blue was closer to a Medium Wedgewood blue. While I know there can be a lot of variation among slabs, the difference with these was quite striking. Unfortunately, DH is not as enamoured with the blues and he leans toward the blacks.

Cloud swift, what color are your cabinets under your island? We are getting maple with what they call a sage wash from DuraSupreme. I wonder how the blue stone would look with the lighter color cabinets. Your island is simply beautiful.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

aamichz5 - I had considered Splash Blue, also called Bros Blue at one yard I found. It is more steel blue gray, but it is pretty. It has a darker blue gray, a light powder blue, and what looks like waves of little rosy garnets. It's one of the most affordable blues. I think it must be gneiss, actually, so it should be pretty sturdy.

My neighbor has what I think she said is Volga Blue, mostly black with those lovely iridescent blue chunks. It looks great with her white cabs.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Aamichz - perhaps you can satisfy both you and your husband by going for one of the dark stones with flashes of iridescent blue.

Most of the blue stones except a couple like blue pearl are expensive. As Karin points out, bright blue is a rare color in the slab yard and that increases the price.

Our cabinets are all natural cherry. Our floor is natural maple. Here is a shot from the family room detail just after the maple floor was installed. Since it is shot over the island, you can see the blue next to the maple floor in it:
 photo IMG_0685.jpg

Here is a close up of the fireplace with Azul do Mar surround and black (probably gabbro) hearth and maple floor. The black looks good with the maple, but it would be a pretty stark contrast with all the counters done in black:
 photo IMG_0716.jpg

By the way, one blue stone you might want to avoid is Blue Bahia - some places call it granite but it is subject to etching and not a granite.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I love Blue Bahia, except for the price, $300 per sq ft in our area.

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Ginny, thanks for the suggestion. I'll ask about Blue Splash the next time I go to the stone yard. Yes Volga Blue has a lot of black specks and some iridescence it it. Sparkles would be an added bonus in my mind. Black Galaxy is also in the running for that reason, though is not my favorite.

Cloud swift, thanks for the pictures. Your Azul looks great with the natural maple. I like the contrast with the black fireplace and the light floors. Our maple finish will be a little darker, and we have natural oak floors. The high contrast of black counters and maple cabinets is one of the things my husband likes best which is why he wants black counters. He is an architect so finding things that I like that he also likes is a major challenge.

In the end, it'll come down to what is available because we will need 2-3 slabs for the kitchen. The stone yard we are working with is getting a lot of new slabs in over the next few weeks so we go periodically to see what is new.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I finally saw Volga Blue slabs IRL. It had only 1 or 2 blue spots and the rest were gold. No Volga blue is out of the running.

The slab store moved the Sea Pearl into the sunlight for me today. It has a greenish tinge to it, but I can't figure out what color of green it is.

Here it is in daylight. Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I finally saw Volga Blue slabs IRL. It had only 1 or 2 blue spots and the rest were gold. No Volga blue is out of the running.

The slab store moved the Sea Pearl into the sunlight for me today. It has a greenish tinge to it, but I can't figure out what color of green it is.

Here it is in daylight. Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Sorry, I don't know why it posted twice.

Another view.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin, I thought you might have fun with this one. Every person that came in the room stopped to touch it. Peke

Oh, never mind! It had the name on it. 😊


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi Peke,

That slab is really pretty. I did finally commit to Sea Pearl for my kitchen. We drove 3 hours to another state to find one without the brown/rust in it. It's not large enough to do the whole kitchen and two slabs are too costly (and I would be wasting at least half of it), so the island will be topped with wood.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

A close-up with my cabinet colors. The white is the perimeter. The wood flooring is heart pine. Anyone with suggestions for the wood top? Right now we are considering natural cherry, which might be a little dark as it ages or maple.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Congratulations, Gigibozo! I saw some leathered sea pearl in person this week and decided against it. I'm afraid that like so many other things, what I *think* I like from reading isn't at all what I like when I see it IRL. I haven't spent a lot of time looking at slabs but don't really feel I've made much progress, either. Started out thinking I wanted soapstone, then white quartzite, and am now interested in the bullet proof dark stuff - blue volga, black thunder, various browns...
If, however, I were to do a wood top I'm sure it would be walnut. Maybe it would help you to do a houzz search? I got one hit from this +pine +floor + butcher +block +white +quartzite


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

kksmama,

Thanks. I love the walnut and originally thought of that, but the house is a shore home so trying to avoid something that dark and brown. That kitchen is stunning though.

Good luck with your search.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Gigi, that is wonderful! Your blue is close to the color I was looking for. It is perfect for a shore home. I like the walnut too. I know nothing about walnut, but does it have to be that dark?

I have an old piece of wood that was my grandmother's. Someone told me it was driftwood. I thought driftwood was rough grayish wood. Anyway the color of it might work. What about butcher block? I will keep an eye out for wood countertops for you. Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Gigi, that is wonderful! Your blue is close to the color I was looking for. It is perfect for a shore home. I like the walnut too. I know nothing about walnut, but does it have to be that dark?

I have an old piece of wood that was my grandmother's. Someone told me it was driftwood. I thought driftwood was rough grayish wood. Anyway the color of it might work. What about butcher block? I will keep an eye out for wood countertops for you. Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

How is the countertop pool coming? I selected Island legs to support the end of my peninsula this morning. Headed out to my second stone yard today. Wish me luck!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi Karen, A question for you. We chose Typhoon Bordeaux and it will be polished. Is antiquing a stone something that can be done after install? I have been debating if I want to antique the stone but would like to try the polished stone first.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi Holly-Kay,

You know, I have no idea what antiquing a stone is. In truth, they are already pretty old. :)

I bet one of the fabricators could help you though.

Animacafe, you go! I think you are pulling ahead. I will predict Gigi, then Animacafe, and then maybe a last-minute surge between KKsMama and Peke.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I came really close this week - saw some gorgeous Atacama black that was already sold to someone else :( Slabs at another yard didn't look nearly as nice, but some Via Lactea looked okay. I've nearly given up on honed/brushed because I'm not seeing it much, and when I do see it (in black) it looks like a fingerprint nightmare. I'm feeling more confident that I can mix something flashy for the island (Delicatus, with black/brown/white/mica) with something mostly black for the perimeter...but only if I'm in love with the island slab and can't afford it for the entire kitchen.
I'm finding it hard to compare what I see in one place to what I see in another: the lighting, and expertise/courtesy (or lack thereof) exhibited by salespeople, and my mood vary so much! Not to mention the lack of clarity on pricing, which they mostly won't share with me. I'm going to go to another place tomorrow. Looking for that one true love and worried that all the good ones are engaged to someone else!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Kksmama
I have the same problems you have mentioned when looking at slabs, especially getting a price. How hard is it to give someone a ball park figure so it can be compared with different granites and marbles. A conspiracy? LOL

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi all! You will not believe this!

I found the exact color of slab I have been looking for!
Thank you...thank you....(I can hear your applause!)

But wait.....there's more ! Don't start placing bets!

It is called Iceberg Blue Quartzite. AND....it is a SOFT quartzite. That seems to be an oxymoron.

It did not scratch the glass tile. It crumbled. I asked if it was really a marble. They said no.

Karin, is it a marble? No sample of course. I am ready to laminate my counters...... I am tired of looking. I found the Iceberg blue in Dallas today. I am back home in Oklahoma tonight.

Well, put me down for last place. I feel like Eeyore! Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin, I love your wall. We need to do the same thing.

Here is a close-up of iceberg blue. There are icy looking flecks in it along with a pale blue, cream, white, gray.

Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Oh Peke, that is lovely. Looking forward to Karin's reply. If it crumbled, that doesn't necessarily mean it is a soft material - it might be brittle with hard stuff held together by weak stuff. I think I remember reading something about those being okay once fabricated and in place (but expensive to fabricate).
I continue to search, learned something new yesterday when I found a good salesperson who polished a slab I liked - it dramatically enhanced it, but I would never do that at home because I wouldn't want "stuff" on the surface and it made it a fingerprint nightmare. I'm adding wet wipes to my purse for my next outing - I want to see how the slabs look clean and dry! And I'm tempted to bring along some kind of little flashlight, too - the variation in lighting is confusing.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peek

I have seen this here in Ohio. I love it. I wanted it, but no one else liked it. Couldn't get a price on the stuff either. Good luck with your new love.

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke, I think that is marble. Sorry! You are correct that there is no such thing as a "soft" quartzite.

In the photo you posted you can see faint lines that look like what you'd expect to see with the mineral calcite. See the post up a bit where I drew lines on the photo.

Plus, it didn't scratch glass.

Plus, it crumbles, so it really doesn't matter beyond that - any rock that crumbles will be a bad idea for a kitchen counter. Both hard and soft rocks can crumble, but either way, I'd cross it off the list for that reason.

So laminate it is then? :)


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke, I'm sure that slab of soapstone is gone by now, but do you mind telling where you saw it in Tulsa?

I may just check in case luck is on my side today!
Haven't seen a thing in north Texas worth getting giddy over!

Thanks


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke, I saw this on Tuesday here in CT and thought of you... beautiful blues and greys with creams and a little silver in it. This photo really doesn't do it justice - it is much lighter in character in person. It is called Azul Aran.

 photo IMG_2505_zps95355629.jpg

I saw a few other interesting rocks in my travels on Tuesday - but nothing for me yet.

I thought this one was fascinating - although not right for my kitchen. It is a gorgeous silvery color in the background. The pattern makes me think of a light snowfall on a ground cover of evergreen with small reddish berries. Here is the slab view:

 photo IMG_2503_zps24c2d5a4.jpg

and the detail:
 photo IMG_2504_zps006ad726.jpg

Unfortunately you can see the pink of the shirt I was wearing reflected in the surface. It was called Silhouette Black.

As for me - I saw a really nice ventura green granite with olivey tones in it that I liked but my husband seems to want something more similar to soapstone. We may go in that direction. They had a few slabs that were quarried in Virginia.

The search continues...


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke,
The slab at 23:57 looks like Blue Celeste marble.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin - most helpful series of posts, thank you.
attached is a pic of 2 different super white samples (one a "granite" and one a "quartzite")
notice both scratched with a knife, "etched" with white vinegar (the big white blobs) and stained with red hot.
however, i also tested a piece of danby marble (not pictured). the danby etch was rough to the touch where the super white "etch" was only visual, turning the spot extra white and dulling the shine. when the vinegar dried it looked like a dollop of white paint before wiping it clean. do you think the etch is actually just a reaction with the resins they apply to the stone or an etch in the actual stone? the fabricator believes this will not occur once sealed (test was on an unsealed piece)
thoughts?
thank you


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

susie, the soapstone was at Bedrock International. I saw an even prettier and lighter one in Dallas yesterday at IMC Dallas.

Austral Dream, Sequoia Brown, and Silver Quartzite are all labeled SOFT Quartzite on the Galleria of Stone website. There were about 10 slabs at the stone yard that were labeled Soft Quartzite. The looked nothing like marble and were set apart from all the marble slabs.

Animacafe, I saw the azul aran yesterday too, but it was much darker than the one you saw. Yours is prettier.

kitchendetective- I checked the blue celeste and it doesn't really look the same. The iceberg blue reminds me of Cristalo or Kristalo. All those beautiful crystals! I have heard that Cristalo is very hard so I cannot figure out why the iceberg blue was soft. They look so much alike except one is blue and one is cream.

Found on geology about website.
Hardness: Hardness (as measured with the Mohs scale) actually refers to minerals rather than rocks, so a rock may be crumbly yet consist of hard minerals. But in simple terms, "hard" rock scratches glass and steel, usually signifying the minerals quartz or feldspar (Mohs hardness 6-7 and up); "soft" rock does not scratch a steel knife but scratches fingernails (Mohs 3-5.5); "very soft" rock does not scratch fingernails (Mohs 1-2). Igneous rocks are always hard. Metamorphic rocks are generally hard.

I guess there is my answer....generally hard.

Identification of Metamorphic Rocks
Foliation Grain Size Usual Color Other Rock type
foliated fine light very soft; greasy feel Soapstone
foliated fine dark soft; strong cleavage Slate
nonfoliated fine dark soft; massive structure Argillite
foliated fine dark shiny; crinkly foliation Phyllite
foliated coarse mixed dark and light crushed and
stretched fabric; deformed large crystals Mylonite
foliated coarse mixed dark and light wrinkled foliation;
often has large crystals Schist
foliated coarse mixed banded Gneiss
foliated coarse mixed distorted "melted" layers
Migmatite
foliated coarse dark mostly hornblende Amphibolite
nonfoliated fine greenish soft; shiny, mottled surface
Serpentinite
nonfoliated fine or coarse dark dull and opaque colors,
found near intrusions Hornfels
nonfoliated coarse red and green dense; garnet and
pyroxene Eclogite
nonfoliated coarse light soft; calcite or dolomite by the
acid test Marble
nonfoliated coarse light quartz (no fizzing with acid)
Quartzite

Where is a bedazzler when I need one? Peke

Here is a link that might be useful: geology about


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Just like what Karin and others have been telling us!

Peke

Here is a link that might be useful: Quartzite...what is it?


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I just found this site. It was very interesting reading. Hope it helps someone.

I am in denial. I want that iceberg blue..........it was just like Breezygirl said when she saw "her" slab. Inhale, stop breathing, then " that's the one! "

It will take me a while to get over it.

Here is a link that might be useful: Know Your Stone and other interesting facts


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Cmam,

Nice results and photos! The etch really is in the stone not the sealer or the resin. It is only on the surface of the stone, but it is definitely in the stone itself. If your fabricator says that a sealer will prevent marble from etching I would recommend a different fabricator because that is untrue and is leading you on in a negligent way.

Peke,

"Metamorphic rocks are generally hard" = NO

Soapstone is a metamorphic rock and that is one of the softest rocks around. Marble is a metamorphic rock that is 3 on the hardness scale. Mica schist is a metamorphic rock that is also very soft. Watch out for blanket statements like that as they often create a lot of confusion. Cool that you are doing so much reading though!

Animacafe,

What an unusual rock that is! The red crystals are garnets that are showing their perfect crystal form, which looks sort of like a hexagon but actually has more sides (sort of a spherical version of a hexagon). I'm not sure what the long, blade-like minerals are, maybe amphibole. The silvery background is mica. It's a metamorphic rock. It's totally cool! Seems like it would be tough to design around though.

Thanks for sharing!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

One possibility if a rock is crumbly but hard might be that it was partially metamorphized on its way to being quartzite. (I think that is sometimes called ortho quartzite.) In quartzite the quartz has recrystalized with the cement so that grain structure of the sand is gone.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

LOL this goes way over what I teach the fifth graders. All I know is that it is amazing that our planet created these beautiful slabs.

Cloudswift, if I understood it correctly, Ortho quartzite is very pure...light colored. If other colors, then it has impurities. Maybe the iceberg blue is not very pure so it is soft. It is so sad I can't have it.

Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Lol Karen! Yes I believe that granite is quite old already. Antiquing, I believe, just gives the stone a more subtle sheen rather than a highly polished surface. I am worried that I won't care for a high gloss surface after it is installed. I wish I could compare my slab with antiquing and polished.

I am not sure how the antiquing is accomplished. I don't know if that is something done upon fabrication or if it can be done after install. I believe also that the colors would be more muted wth an antiqued surface but I am not sure.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke, I feel your pain. The first stone I fell in love with - in fact, the one that made me realize I didn't want engineered quartz after all - was Jerusalem Limestone. It was full of fossils. I envisioned fossil hunting in my kitchen. I read everything I could find on it, testimonials about how much people loved it and how it held up really well, and tried to convince myself that it wasn't really too soft for a kitchen counter. Finally, a GC who was also a certified KD told me, "No, really not a good idea, you will regret it." So, sadly, I left the fantasy behind and started looking at granite. I love my granite, and instead of fossil hunting, I hunt feldspar and quartz crystals. I can hunt fossils out in the yard if I want.

Iceberg blue, like Jerusalem limestone, is like that gorgeous-but-bad-news boy you have to let go so you can move on and find a good man to marry. Your true love is still out there.

BTW, I really liked that Know Your Stone site. I wish I had had my DD read it before her Earth Science Regents this morning.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Ginny, ok my bad boy is gone. I am now looking for Azul Caribe, Blue Titanium, Azul Domar, Caribbean Blue, and cross cut White Macaubus.

Here is a picture of Titanium Quartzite from stonecontact.

Every other place I see it shows a black slab.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Wow! Can you see that IRL? I saw a "titanium black" featured as the stone of the month on this website, http://www.elegant-granite.com/ Clearly no relation to the picture you posted. Hang in there, Peke! 5 years from now you'll hardly remember the hassles of this stone selection process but you'll still be enjoying a rock it took thousands of years to create.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke,

I love this! Too busy for a kitchen like mine, but it is beautiful,

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

The colors are perfect.

Kksmama, no I haven't seen it IRL. The rust streaks would match my cabinet color.

Karen, It is probably too busy for mine too. I just love the
aquas. Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke, i think it would look fabulous surrounding a fireplace. Can you imagine how nice it would look in the light from a fire? The colors are fantastic. You must be traveling all over the place to find such a variety of stone. Thanks for sharing all the pictures.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I just figured out that "titanium" has been mislabeled. I really think it is a blue "fusion". What do you think?

I just type in blue quartzite and find slabs from all over. My traveling has been limited to Dallas and Tulsa. Dallas is 3 1/2 hours away and Tulsa is 2 hours away so I have to travel to look at anything beyond builders grade gold.

I think I figured out something else....but I might be way off base. It's about quartzite.

Karin, is it possible that there is a quartzite that looks more like crystals? They look totally different than all other hquartzite when close up. Maybe they are the " soft" quartzites. I am thinking of cristallo/kristallo, iceberg blue, etc. A fabricator near me said cristallo was one of the hardest stones to cut. It was the first quartzite they had ever cut.

Here is a close up of the "crystals" I am talking about. (crystals might not be the best word. It is more like small shapes of stones.)

Peke


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Here is a close up of the cristallo the fabricator said was very hard.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

This is fusion. I think it looks like the picture called titanium.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi all! I'm deep in the throes of renovation this week. I bought all my tile. I'm deciding between 2 kitchen designers and cabinets. They both should be getting me quotes this week. My guest bathroom vanity is very small (27 in wide). I'm doing this piece of fusion, with a banjo, and an 8 in backsplash. I'm looking for a clear glass vessel sink with a touch of green. Hoping to leave FL next week with a lot more finalized. Fell in love with the fusion...


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

JoanLast, I can see why you fell in love with it. Gorgeous.

And yes, Peke, I think what they called Titanium looks an awful lot like Fusion, now that you mention it.

I'm curious what Karin will say about the quartzite "crystals." I'd say that looks like quartz rather than calcite, but I'm not trained. Didn't Karin say that calcite would have sort of rhombus/parallel cleavage, while quartz has hexagonal crystals and uneven fracture. It sure is pretty, whatever it is. I love that crystalline appearance.

Are you going to go see Fusion anyplace? Boy, I thought it was a big deal to go 1.5 hours away to check out a stone yard. Can you get them to send you email pictures of some of their slabs so you can at least know which direction to drive?


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke,

I love that "titanium quartzite". Could you ask them to e-mail you more pictures of the slab or to verify the name? I've seen a lot of different slabs of Fusion here in Florida. My fabricator just lost a job with 7 slabs, because it was just too expensive. The variation from one side of a slab to the other side is huge. I would have to see the slab before committing. Fusion is beautiful, but busy. The blues in the slabs I saw were much darker. I didn't notice much aqua in the Fusion slabs I looked at. My sister just had a pretty blue granite installed this week. I'll have to dig up the picture and send it. I should be sleeping right now, not thinking about all this kitchen stuff. LOL! Renovations and being 53 are not helping my sleep!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke,

This is my sister's Blue Sky. I'll be able to see it installed on Wednesday.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Peke, yes, a quarzite can have "crystals," and a marble can as well. What it really is is larger crystals, which can mean the rock was closer to melting, or did partially melt, or had water present which allows larger crystals to form. The rocks that look more grainy just have smaller crystals; simple as that.

There is no such thing as soft quartzite, and the size of the crystals has nothing to do with the hardness of the stone. So you can rule out those variables.

Both marble and quartzite can have small crystals, medium-sized, or large crystals. But if the crystals are larger you might be able to see the rhombus shapes or subtle lines that intersect at 120 degrees and 60 degrees in marble, making diagnosis a little bit easier. It's unlikely with quartzite that you'd see hexagonal shapes.

If the fabricator says it's very hard, that's a good sign of quartzite!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I think I found it! I've looked at a lot of slabs, and I think I considered all materials and colors: marble, soapstone, wood, black, white, blue, brown, tan, silver - they all looked good to me at one time or another.
The Sweeby test helped me come around to seeing that I wanted a calming, neutral pattern with a black background. This isn't at all a good picture, I'm taking dh for final approval and will get a sample. But this seems like the super hard, bullet proof stuff and it did scratch glass easily. IRL you can see what looks like waves of sand and all the movement goes one direction. They say it is from India, so far I can't find any info on it on any other website. Karin, any thoughts?

Here is a link that might be useful: Godiva


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

A better picture. But it doesn't look nearly so busy in person. Maybe because the slab is so big? I feel badly for the TKO who have to drive further to see slabs, I'm finding only the loosest association between how something looks in pictures and how it looks IRL. This picture is too intense for me, too much pattern and contrast but I didn't think so when I was there. I think this might be called black markino, still can't find any info on it on the web.
 photo photo_zps7e0d8b3c.jpg

Kksmamakitchen's  album on Photobucket


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hubby and I went to the Parade of Homes in Jerome Twnshp today. It is near Columbus, OH. We saw some very interesting granites and marbles!

I found a new favorite, Alpine White, honed, but not completely, as it had some streaks of shine scattered throughout. Looks like a marble. It is not Super White. They call it granite, but is it really granite? I saw another stone that either was quartzite or granite with big quartzite crystals, but I forgot to ask the "hosts" of that house. Then there was a third granite, that if I loved green I would definitely use that stone. The pattern was linear sage green with white and cranberry colors, garnet maybe? A very subdued piece.

Blue Pearl or Alpine White? Or both?

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I'm going to the Parade of Homes next week. You've got me excited to check out the granite!

Thanks!
Joan


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

We didn't go into every house because we were on a mission to look at the wood floors by Schlabach out of Millersburg. I love what they do! Wish I had known about them when I added onto the house ten years ago. I hope they are competitive with pricing. We looked at house #13 love the gas lights at front door and the floor. I think #6 had the Alpine White granite. Number 3 may have the green and garnet granite. This granite is on the front cover of the booklet. Where is the kitchen with the quartzite type island? Can't remember, but it should be on the west side of the street. So tired right now, it all runs together, plus it was HOT. There was one house with, "what were they thinking granite?" see if you find it!

I remember when this was a sleepy little area. Now it is too much like Muirfield. Why does anyone want to spend that much money and then watch your neighbor in their backyard? Wish they could have developed an equestrian community because it is so close to Glacier Ridge, plus there are two riding stables nearby. I think Columbus would have benefitted from this idea and it might have worked since it is near the city. Oh well, my rant for the day. Have fun, because they are quite nice.

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

KKsmama,

Nice find, I'm happy for you! The rock is a metamorphic rock called gneiss (pronounced "nice") and it's going to be totally durable. Gneiss forms from heating and compression of a rock to the point where the mineral ingredients separate into bands. Each band has similar minerals in it, so it looks like stripes of different colored minerals. The banding is perpendicular to the direction the compression came from. So in the second photo you posted, it got squeezed from the lower right and upper left.

Because the rock was hot and semi-fluid, the bands become swirls in some places.

Gneiss contains the same minerals as granite and will behave similarly. I'd expect it to hold up really well.

Congratulations and thanks for sharing the happy news!

Karen, I looked up Alpine White and it looks like more than one stone goes by that name. In one case it was one of those mystery rocks that looks like either quartzite or marble and the stone yard listed it as AKA Super White. But other photos showed a granite-type rock that looks sort of like Alaska White. If you do a Google image search you'll see both kinds.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Joan

Maybe you could take pictures and post them. I don't have that capability with my old flip phone!

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin,

I have seen where they can be called the same. All of the Super White to me looks different. A much stronger marbling and darker, but it could have been the shipment. It was too funny with one of the reps, because I kept calling it Alpine White, she kept saying it was gray! But it's white! LOL

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karin,

I have seen where they can be called the same. All of the Super White to me looks different. A much stronger marbling and darker, but it could have been the shipment. It was too funny with one of the reps, because I kept calling it Alpine White, she kept saying it was gray! But it's white! LOL

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Karen,

I looked at a great house in an equestrian community in Blacklick when I moved to OH a few years ago. We're on the reservoir 10 minutes east of the Parade homes.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Joan,

Yes,
It seems like all of the good equestrian communities are on the east side. Rocky Fork Hunt Club is near Gahanna and there are several stables in the Johnstown area. Tami Longaberger bought a huge property to raise Thoroughbreds, but dispersed the herd when she became pregnant.

We couldn't live on the east side because my husband transferred from PA to work at Scotts Miracle Gro in Marysville. We live in the Boonies of Richwood.

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thank you, Karin! I'm super excited now, I had kinda thought that I wouldn't love my countertops, it was easy for me to find reasons NOT to like all the other slabs I'd seen. But this one is perfect for me, it has just the right amount and kind of movement, and the right balance of the right colors. DH and my kids like it too.

I brought a sample home today and taped out a grid, put red wine vinegar, lemon juice, muriatic acid, ketchup, raspberry jam, coffee, and tumeric with oil on it and left for a few hours. No changes. I whacked it hard with the heavy handle of a butter knife and did put a crack in it (and then easily snapped that corner off) but the sample is 1cm so I hope that my 3cm counters wouldn't do the same? I was able to scratch glass with it, but a sharp glass corner also scratched the stone a little when pressed very hard. On the broken edge, small glittery flakes (mica?) are numerous. I feel terrible about the abuse I've heaped on this cute little square!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Love all the great torture research!
Karen, we should meet at Doc Henderson's and commiserate over a great lunch:-)


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Joan.

What a great idea. Haven't been there for a while.
My email is trisox1984@yahoo.com


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Off topic but... So funny to know there are so many people on GW around Columbus!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Hi Karin,

Is there any difference between a 'quartz' and a 'quartzite'?

It's interesting, Antonlini seems to have both, but the 'quartz' is not the engineered kind.

If the link doesn't work google antolini naica quartz

Here is a link that might be useful: Pure Quartz?


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

j_hack

Great comment. If you don't live in Ohio, at least we do have something in common besides rocks. June is a great month. :-)

Karen


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

lucas - Ooh, ooh! Pick me! I know this one! Who would have thought that prepping DD for her Earth Science Regents Exam would have been so useful?

Pure quartz sand can turn into sedimentary sandstone. Sandstone metamorphosizes (through tectonic forces, as the site says) into quartzite. It is pure quartz - quartz is the mineral, quartzite is the rock. As pure quartz, it has a hardness of 7 on the Mohs scale, which makes it pretty hard.

That is beautiful stone - so subtle.


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

I am in Columbus. We just moved back from West Virginia (thankfully). We are having a house built in Grove City currently, but we have lived all around Columbus... Pickerington, Hilliard, Grandview, and Columbus itself. We are happy to be home for sure. My wife is ready for me to stop with research, but I'm not ready or finished! There are so many choices to make!

Thankfully Karen has chimed in with all the rock info and everyone's pictures help to visualize it all. So thanks everyone for the info and pics!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thanks Ginny20.

I haven't seen that one, though there are dealers in the area that carry that line, and even more important, I haven't seen the price yet ;-)

But need to look at all possibilities!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Thanks Ginny20.

I haven't seen that one, though there are dealers in the area that carry that line, and even more important, I haven't seen the price yet ;-)

But need to look at all possibilities!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

kksmama, I just saw your post here about your counter top choice. It is beautiful! What a nice choice! I'll bet you are glad you didn't find anything earlier. Looks like this was just meant to be!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

kksmama, I just saw your post here about your counter top choice. It is beautiful! What a nice choice! I'll bet you are glad you didn't find anything earlier. Looks like this was just meant to be!


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

The slab that animacafe posted on June 1, that looks like a collection of pebbles, is Black & Gold Marinace (sometimes also called Mosaic among other things). It is literally the bottom of a riverbed in Brazil, all the small stones are the pebbles and stones that collected at the bottom of the river, and the black rock filling in all the space between them is a sedimentary rock (as Karin explained in an earlier thread). So it's technically a mega conglomerate, and a really interesting stone. When we first saw it, we loved it but thought it was too wild for our kitchen, but in the end we ended up using it and absolutely love it. We had the finish leathered, which removed the polished glare (and makes it look more natural) and gave it a very subtle texture which ends up being something that people can't resist "petting." It's a wonderful granite and we are thrilled that we took the risk over something safer. I posted a thread with pics earlier (my iPhone photos don't begin to do it justice, but you can get an idea) and I'm posting it here so anyone interested can see that such a "wild" granite can end up working. It's not to everyone's taste, but we love it. And thanks to the fine folks at Garden Web, we ended up with a wonderfully functional kitchen that is a joy to work in.

Here is a link that might be useful: Reveal thread


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

Fabulous reveal, Gone_South, thanks for the link! Those counters are perfect for your space and vice versa!
Thanks, Holly-kay, I really am thrilled with the Godiva and I am fairly sure it isn't just because I'm a chocolate fiend. Funny about all these decisions: once you find the "right" answer it is easy to move on to the next question...the ones that aren't quite right keep nagging!
Karin, I hope you're around to start Round 4 of great rocks, I'm not giving up on Peke!

Here is a link that might be useful: Rocks #4 marble, granite, quartzite

This post was edited by kksmama on Thu, Jul 4, 13 at 10:13


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RE: Countertop Geology: Marble and quartzite and granite, oh my!

KKsMama,

Good for you to put your rock through the ringer. I wouldn't worry about a 1cm slab breaking when you whack it. Just about anything would break under those circumstances. The only thing I'd watch out for is large overhangs that are parallel to the grain of the rock. But with a 3 cm slab that rock will be pretty strong. Yes, the glittery bits are mica. Muscovite if they are silvery or biotite if they are black.

Keep us posted with how the templating and install goes - I'm sure you will since we are all following you vicariously!

Lucas,

Quartz is the mineral and quartizite is the rock that is made out of quartz. It's splitting hairs really, because as you point out the rock is made of 100% quartz. That's a beautiful rock, wow! Are you going to get it?

(PS - Nice job Ginny on describing how it forms!)

Gone South,

Oh yes, I fondly remember your cool riverbed rock. I am still hoping to get a table with that someday. Thanks for posting your follow up info and link.

Goodness, this thread has filled up fast - less than a month! I will start round 4 (for Peke).

Karin


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