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what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

Posted by fori (My Page) on
Thu, Feb 27, 14 at 17:32

Howdy!

This is a 1950sish slate floor. Is there a name to this pattern?

I'd want it a little less rustic (you know, flatter) but I think something like this might be nice for the kitchen/family room/breakfast area addition to our midcentury not modern house. But I don't know how to look for it. Any suggestions?

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

Maybe some variation of a hopscotch pattern?

Here is a link that might be useful: Daltile Multiple Tile Patterns


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

It looks like an Ashlar pattern, or a modified one.
Only concerns I would have with slate in a kitchen is oil/grease darkening near the cook and prep areas, and the cold/hardness underfoot. If you are ok with a "living" finish, it would be very appropriate in a mid century, and a cool look.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

Thank you both! Those would both be good 'nuff for me! I should have known Daltile would have something in their tile planner!

Yeah slate is a tricky one...I don't know if it could be sealed adequately but perhaps another dark grey stone would work. Living finish is one thing. Gross is another!

I like squishy floors but I don't know if I can put linoleum in a family room and they're going to be very open to one another (pretty much in the same room). And then there's the kids and dog and they (okay, mostly me but a little bit them) have messed up the oak in the existing house so some sort of hard, unforgiving surface makes sense.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

We had such a floor in our entry hall in a colonial which was built about 1959-62 in southwest Connecticut.

It was significantly less bumpy than fori's example.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

The midcentury variation was often more like this

Here is a link that might be useful: Vermont Slate


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Also

Also I think the pattern with this many sizes is called Versailles, or French pattern. Google it, it looks like it to me.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

I thought Versailles had a repeating pattern and I don't see that here ... ?

Fori, have you considered a slate-look porcelain? You might find one in sizes available to create a Versailles pattern.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

The couple at YHL just cleaned up their slate floor. Love the look.

Here is a link that might be useful: YHL Slate Floor


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

That slate floor is absolutely gorgeous. My brother has Brazilian grey slate in his 1950s renovated kitchen. He sealed it and has not had a single issue. His tile is a little more smooth than that. I have ostrich gray slate in my foyer, laundry room, and powder room. And I intend to install the same slate in my kitchen (have a stack of it waiting in the basement). I think slate tile floors are fantastic for kitchens and would work really well in a family room with rugs for a little softness underfoot.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

Slate is wonderful but yearly sealing would be a good idea in a kitchen. It's very porous and the sealant wears off.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

Thanks so much all!

I think I've got the spouse on board. The breakfast area will open out onto a covered patio and I could spill the slate out there maybe. (I assume it would be too hot to use in uncovered parts of the yard, but maybe I should visit the Pool Forum....)

I've considered porcelain but nahhhh it's just not the same somehow! :) If I were doing porcelain/ceramic, I'd go all out with saltillo which I could probably pull off being in CA. Or terrazzo which would probably be too awesome for me to pull off! (We're adding a small bath though and I may go full-on glitter in there.)

I was thinking of starting with filthy colored grout so I wouldn't notice staining--Pricklypear, what type of grout do you have and does it stain? Maybe I don't need to start with dirt colored grout...

Love the floor on YHL! And I do have a spot or two where I could test out that product.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

fori, I have a slate patio and slate walkways all around my house (So Cal) and it is not hot at all. Staining has not been a problem with our natural grey grout, even being outdoors, though we do periodically reseal the stone/grout.


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

We have duraceramic in our bathrooms. It's a composite tile with a vinyl overlay. It can be grouted. It is so easy to clean and has worn sooooo well. They have tiles that look like slate. They can even be cut to different sizes.

Here is a link that might be useful: Duraceramic


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

"stat with filthy-colored grout." Maybe that should be a color name! I would never be good at marketing...


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RE: what do you call this floor and would it be bad in kitchen?

we had similar black slate in our MCM. I was told by my tile installer it was called a Mondrian pattern. It had clearly not been sealed in many years and was in such bad shape we decided not to salvage it and replaced it with a lighter tile.

foyer photo DSC_5214_zps07d05fc4.jpg


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