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The hottest new European kitchen trends

Posted by nosoccermom (My Page) on
Wed, Feb 20, 13 at 9:28

related to another thread I started on IKEA's new oak kitchens, below is a summary of the new trends in European kitchens, based on the Eurocucina exhibit (there are pictures and more explanations on the link). Short summary:

1. KITCHEN CABINET FINISHES GO RAW NATURAL
(think dark and natural oaks)

WHITE AND BLACK APPLIANCES TAKING OVER

MATTE FINISH PREFERRED FOR APPLIANCES

INTEGRATED HANDLES BECOMING THE NORM
(And I just added handles to my oak cabinets)

EXTRA THICK AND EXTRA THIN COUNTERTOPS
(quartz, wood, glass)

TEXTURED COUNTERTOPS APPEALING TO THE SENSES
(picture shows something like a concrete block rescued from some shipwreck)

INDOOR GARDENS GROWING IN THE KITCHEN

OPEN SHELVING UNITS FOR VISUAL VARIETY
(Everywhere!)

LED PANELS OFFERING NEW LIGHTING OPTIONS

“WATERFALL” COUNTERTOPS

http://www.snaidero-usa.com/designliving-blog/2012/05/03/eurocucina-2012-recap-hottest-european-kitchen-trends-to-follow


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: The hottest new European kitchen trends

the Cologne Germany show from Jan 2013 really provoked some comment about the 1cm countertops.


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RE: The hottest new European kitchen trends

Thanks for the link nosoccermom. Very interesting. The notion behind the quote below about the absence of upper cabinets in Europe stroke me as ironic:

"While this trend is very popular in Europe, it still remains to be seen whether it can make its way into the North American kitchens, where upper cabinets are still loved and very much seen as a necessity."

Ironic, or incongruous, as space is tight in Europe, homes and kitchens are smaller, and if any kitchen truly needed uppers, you would think in would be European kitchens. We have all the space in the world in North America, and most have huge homes and kitchens. But uppers are viewed as a necessity. Go figure.


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RE: The hottest new European kitchen trends

I have heard that Europeans take their cabinets with them when they move, so it makes sense to only buy lower cabinets.

This post was edited by may_flowers on Wed, Feb 20, 13 at 18:34


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RE: The hottest new European kitchen trends

I am not sure how much of this will follow to America. Americans don't seem to embrace the Italian modernist type of kitchen. Snaidero has offered integral pulls forever (So has Siematic, who developed them)--but the only place I ever see them here are in medical offices. I am surprised that some of the things show are actually considered trends at this show--they seem pretty perenially European to me. The upper shelf vs. cabinet does actually seem to be making headway.


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RE: The hottest new European kitchen trends

Indoor gardens seem new, except perhaps in southern France, Italy, Portugal, etc., but there the herb garden is probably just outside the door or window. Agree most doesn't seem new, thin counters have been popular for years (getting more popular on this side of the Atlantic I think). I don't think SS was ever as popular in Europe as it is here, except for the UK perhaps. I tend not to include the UK when talking about European treads, they often are pretty distinct. When it comes to anything actually, not just design.


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RE: The hottest new European kitchen trends

It's hard to predict, but I still think that a lot of the European trends come over here (e.g. frameless cabinets were unusual 20 years ago). Also the trend towards more built-in appliances.


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RE: The hottest new European kitchen trends

new builds/conversions of older buildings will have upper cabinets. the older quaint dwellings will have a combination of lower ceiling heights/ancient beams/plastered and very uneven walls/tiny kitchen area fitted with high end efficient appliances[they excel with this] leaving a shortage of space for upper cabs. The "dresser" for dish storage/laying out food is a good union between a dining table area and the kitchen. The concept of no wall cabinets doesn't mean there is no upper storage.


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