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e-coli and HUS

Posted by blsdgal (My Page) on
Tue, Dec 27, 05 at 21:50

I know it's a little late, but just wanted to alert you all to watch Anderson Cooper tonight on CNN. A relative with two of their children hospitalized with e-coli will be interviewed.

They can't figure out the source of the e-coli.

Very bizarre.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: e-coli and HUS

Have the kids drunk apple cider recently?

I saw a a case where some farmer had his Apple press in the barn (with the animals!) and that's how a group of children contracted e-coli.


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RE: e-coli and HUS

I had an e coli infection last year from an unknown source.
I nearly died.
Don't really know why I am telling everybody this because I have nothing more to say.

Good Night Mary!


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RE: e-coli and HUS

Would someone please explain what e-coli is (I know it's an illness but virus or bacterial?), what the symptoms are, and why it's so deadly? Thanks so much!


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RE: e-coli and HUS

E-coli is an illness caused by a bacteria. The bacteria itself comes in many strains, and is very common in the intestinal tract of humans and animals. It's mainly spread by unwashed hands after using the bathroom or after coming into contact with soils that contain animal waste.

Foods with a high moisture and protein content (such as meats) allow the bacteria to thrive, and, if stored at improper temperatures, multiply rapidly. E-Coli bacteria are killed by cooking, which is one reason it's important to cook meats, particularly ground meats, thoroughly. (The interior of an intact cut of meat may safely be left rare since it did not come into contact with the bacteria.) The best prevention is a combination of thorough hand-washing, proper sanitation of food prep surfaces, cooking to proper temperatures, and maintaining food at safe storage temperatures (either hot or cold - not in between).

When live bacteria are ingested in sufficient numbers, they can cause an infection and produce some nasty toxins. Most often, it's the very young and old and those with compromised immune systems who are most affected.


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RE: e-coli and HUS

I got an e-coli infection from walking around the edge of the local park after the last sewer spill. The city banned entry or use of the park about 2 days later.


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RE: e-coli and HUS

And here's probably how BmorePanic or anyone else picked up an infection-----

There's a sewer spill near the park. Animals, wild or domestic pets, or birds, track the bacteria around farther than the immediate area of the sewage. So when you walk around the park, far away from the actual spill, you're picking up the bacteria in the dirt on your shoes. When you get home, you take off your shoes, move them into the closet, pick them up again later. So, you happen to touch your face or mouth with your hand that just handled your shoe, and you pick up the bacteria.

I am not germ-phobic by any means. But this is a clarification or illustration as to how bacteria can spread.


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RE: e-coli and HUS

You know the "5 second rule"? Well, I'm often in the habit of picking up a piece of food, say a chip, or whatever, laughing, mentioning the 5 second rule, and then eating it! Mind you, in my own house, which is very clean if I may say. However, I will never do that again!! The other night, there was a show on TV on Discovery Health, "Dr Know", and this guy tested the 5 second rule by dropping a jelly bean, a shrimp, and a piece of melon on a kitchen floor, mall food court floor, and outside in a park on the grass. Just about everything except the jelly bean (hard & dry) cultured significant amounts of e coli -- it was totally disgusting and horrifying. If you walk outdoors and then indoors with shoes on, and expecially if you have pets, you can bet that your floors are loaded with e coli even if you are a very clean housekeeper. So, forget the 5 second rule...it any food falls on any floor, throw it out! And wash your hands often!


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RE: e-coli and HUS

Actually, the '5-second rule' is not so bad healthwise if you eat the dropped item right away - especially if it's not a 'wet' item and the floor is a 'sorta clean' hard surface. You would only be exposed to the relatively few bacteria picked up by a small item in a small area over a small time frame. But putting it back into the bowl would be a problem, because then any bacteria picked up would have a chance to multiply over time.


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