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on line pharmacies reviews?

Posted by behaviorkelton (My Page) on
Mon, Aug 13, 07 at 8:24

I have ordered prescription drugs (w/o a prescription) online about five years ago, and was pleased with the speed and quality of service.

I'm thinking of doing the same thing with my migraine medication (Imitrex). Imitrex is expensive, but there is a generic version available overseas.

Inhouse Pharmacies sells it for a reasonable price.

So with all of the developments in the ever-evolving internet, is there an "epinions" for on line pharmacies?

I love the idea of taking responsibility for my own health (or lack of health) and skipping the bureaucracy... to say nothing of having to drive to the doctor, wait in line, yet again, to get a prescription refilled.

Looking forward to responses


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: on line pharmacies reviews?

I ordered through an online pharmacy several years ago. I will never do that again. To this day they will not stop calling me. Know matter what i do or say to them, they will not leave me alone.


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RE: on line pharmacies reviews?

I didn't have that experience with the company I actually used, but I must have been invaded by some sort of adware/bot thingy... because when I was just looking around in another online pharmacy a few months ago, I began getting tons of spam from all angles... so I wasn't able to block them easily.

Still, I imagine that there are good pharmacies... even the ones in India... I'd just like to know which one is the good one! (meaning, "which one is has quality medicine and won't hassle me after the order!")


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RE: on line pharmacies reviews?

I've ordered items (no prescriptions though) from Drugstore.com and have had very good service. You might want to try them?


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RE: on line pharmacies reviews?

I did that once and they are PESTS with their phone calls. I agree...don't do it!!!


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RE: on line pharmacies reviews?

behaviorkelton -"I have ordered prescription drugs (w/o a prescription) online about five years ago, and was pleased with the speed and quality of service.

I'm thinking of doing the same thing with my migraine medication (Imitrex). Imitrex is expensive, but there is a generic version available overseas."

behaviorkelton-Though it isn't related to the original topic, I thought you might find this article of interest.


Magnetic stimulation blocks migraine pain

June 27, 2008

A hand-held device that painlessly sends a magnetic pulse into the head may offer some migraine sufferers relief, a small study suggests.

The device delivers a therapy known as transcranial magnetic stimulation, or TMS. It sparks a magnetic pulse that, when held against a person's head, creates an electric current among the nerves cells of the brain.

This, in turn, disrupts migraines in the "aura" phase, before they trigger pain.

Though migraines strike without warning in most cases, some people experience an aura stage, which is marked by visual disturbances, like flashes of light or zigzag lines, or other sensations such as tingling or numbness.

For the new study, researchers recruited 201 patients suffering from migraine with aura, then randomly assigned them to use the TMS device or a "sham" device the investigators used for comparison. Patients were instructed to apply the device over the site of the migraine, at its onset.

The researchers found that two hours after treatment, 39 percent of the TMS patients were pain-free, versus 22 percent of patients using the sham device.

Dr. Yousef Mohammad, of The Ohio State University in Columbus, reported the findings Friday at the annual meeting of the American Headache Society, underway in Boston.

"This is very significant," Mohammad told Reuters Heath. "This is a much better response than is achieved with any other method or medication that we have."

By interfering with the aura phase of migraine, Mohammad explained, TMS essentially interrupts the "electrical storm" that culminates in migraine pain.

In some study patients, the treatment also eased migraine-related symptoms of nausea and sensitivity to light and sound.

"This is very highly significant," Mohammad said. "We have never received this kind of response" with any currently available migraine medication or device.

Sunnyvale, California-based NeuraLieve, the manufacturer of the TMS device used in the study, funded the work. Mohammad serves on the company's board of directors.

A link that might be useful:

www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=magnetic-stimulation


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RE: on line pharmacies reviews?

I had a doctor from Pakistan that warned me about prescriptions from foreign countries. He said some are tampered with especially in his country...like taking apart a capsule and filling it with rice or something else. He bought his mother's drugs here. In spite of how much I dislike what the drug companies do, I do trust them over a foreign country.


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