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what would you do in this garage? PICS

Posted by ekoreilly (My Page) on
Tue, Sep 26, 06 at 20:12

We are moving into a existing home. It has a 2+ car garage and it's mostly drywalled. I found it odd they stopped short of going to the floor of the garage. I found the divider/partition STUPID and they will come down immediately. Also they did not insulate it (where you can see) I thought maybe I use that Blow in isulation where they spray it and shave it off evenly.

In the back corner I will put in a 10 foot workbench awith peg board, just simple stuff

So my question is what would you suggestions be in regards to finishing off the walls? I live in Upstate NY





Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS



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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

If you're going to heat it, then insulation is a must. Batts or blown-in in the ceiling; Extruded or expanded polystyrene in the walls. Something on the garage doors too, or new insulated doors if it's in the budget.


You'll probably need a couple more circuits for the workbench, depending, of course, on exactly what you're planning to do. It looks like Mickey (Mouse, that is) was busy--I see two switches in that flimsy partition). So watch yourself removing the wall.

A safety note: those steps would not be allowed in new construction across the Lake. A landing would be required.
At the least, put in a more solid rail and support. If you trip and grab that existing rail, you'll likely go right through it.

Oh, you aksed about the walls. Paint them! And don't worry about finishing them smooth first.

That should keep you out of trouble for awhile!


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

Thanks for the info. never noticed the lightswithc on that cardboard wall. What on earth do people think.. My motto is, if your going to do it, do it right. Good mentioned on the Stairs and landing and that rail. Definartely something to consider, I like the landing idea.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

two other thoughts:

!) what is the best way for cleaning the concrete floor? there is some oil type stains, look at pic w/ stairs), what would one do to clean it up? I thought of powerwashing the whole floor before moving in and painting it, but feel I should allow more than two days before walking on it.
Would I be better off having a concrete renovator type person come in and do something to it?

2) Drywall, as you can see on the garage door part, there still need to be drywall put up. I plan on insulating it and drywalling. is there a firecode drywal that has to go up?


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

There are several ways of cleaning concrete of deep stains. They pretty much all come down to scraping off or absorbing fresher stains, applying specialized cleaners then power washing off. I haven't tried this product, which claims to be an ecologically sounder way of cleaning asphalt and concrete. You can seal or paint or epoxy coat it afterwards. (There are some threads here on diy epoxy coating that show very impressive results.)

For residential use, a standard 1/2" drywall is fine. What Codes are really concerned about is "gasproofing" to ensure that CO from idling motors in the garage doesn't leak into the house. A heavy duty self-closer is now usually required on the garage to house door.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

When we built our house 20 years ago one of the best decisions I ever made was having all the walls and ceiling in the garage sheetrock, sprayed and painted white. It made all the difference in the world. The cost of having this done at the time the house was built was minor in comparison...

Finishing the sheet rock, texturing and painting will go a long ways in making your garage an enjoyable working space. I agree with the others about code issues, insulation and such.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

2 things:

What do you guys for lighting? We have just the one light socket and I would like to plan the long flourescent lights or thought of doing recessed lights? any suggestions?

The garage door opener is 13 years old. no safety sensor. tHinking of replacing the opener, is it easy to do or not a DIY project. ALl I would be doing is replaceing and adding a keypad and safety sensor.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

You can't add a safety sensor if it was not build with the safety sensor technology. Your only option would be replacing it. If you just wanted a keypad you would probably have to install a reciever as well in order for the key pad to work with the older opener. I would tear that garage door out and put in a 2 inch thick double sided steel.

Installing a new opener isn't that hard if you have some mechanical aptitude.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

I think I will be installing a ne opener. Saw the idrive and hear it's not too great but Belt seem to be the way to go.

Next will be garage doors, but Furst I want to do other things to it.

Does insulating it help alot durin winter, even though I don't have a heater in it yet?


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

No, don't waste your time trying to add insulation to the door. It won't do anything but put strain on the springs and opener from the added weight.

Yes, stay away from the I-Drive and anything else with Wayne Dalton's name on it. Go with a Craftsmen or Chamberlain opener if you are doing it yourself. Stay away from the screwdrive openers as well, no matter what brand.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

Personally, I don't like drywall in "work" spaces. It's just too fragile. Using 1/2" plywood like drywall and painting it is, IMO, a much better choice. It looks almost as nice as painted drywall, and will stand up much better to the inevitable run-ins with car doors, lawnmowers, you name it.

Also, installing a new garage door opener may be a DIY-able project. Installing a new garage *door* is NOT. The springs on a garage door are VERY dangerous if you don't know what you're doing.. I would certainly hire out changing the door, and if you're replacing the door that's the best time to have the opener changed too.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

THanks Perel. I will consider finishing it off in the wood, but drywall will mathc up with whats left. As far as a work area, my "bench area" which will be where that stupis panel wall is (when I tear it down)and will use the peg board around that. I also plan on putting some electrical.

QUESTION, you guys see that "loft" above the paneling, I plan on keeping it there but don't want to put up support poles (i'll bang into them too much) so how would you suspend it from the rafters? I went up in the rafters yesetrday and there are trusses galore up ther, 2x4's.


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RE: what would you do in this garage? PICS

I can't tell how long/deep your garage is but I recently dealt with my annoying steps by building (well, having built) a landing about 7 1/2 feet deep along the entire back wall and put the steps in the middle (there the landing is about 4' deep and the steps take 3'). The whole thing has a rail. I covered it all in outdoor carpet and had 4 large boxes (the contractor called them coffins) built of plywood and put on casters for underneath. It is a beautifully functional thing. The large containers hold all of the out of season beach stuff, chair cushons, fishing gear, snow sleds, skates, etc. At one end of the platform is my freezer - just outside the kitchen door - no steps! The other end is a work area with old kitchen cabinets to house all the tools that are used in the house on a regular basis. the back wall has narrow shelving for all of the boys' sport stuff. The storage area on ground level has the bikes and garden stuff. I LOVE it. Both cars have access to the steps and you don't have to go down steps to access all of the garage stuff that you need in the house. I know it would be nicer painted but right now I am more into function.


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