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Casco Bay Leather Sofa

Posted by Patsi1950 (My Page) on
Wed, May 23, 12 at 7:45

I have been researching the best leather sofa for the money, and have seen comments in this forum in the past that are very positive. I have a 65 lb American Bulldog that loves to hang out with us on the sofa! I would appreciate any comments from those who bought this furniture. Thanks!


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RE: Casco Bay Leather Sofa

It could be a ok deal if they only someone would teach them how to actually tie coil springs the correct way. Some fault is with the spring-up person and the sample frame maker. The spring-up person is telling the sample frame maker to raise the rails so it will much easier for them to tie. These seat rails for are to high, should be dropped about 1" and half. But if they did; it would take them twice as long to tie.
But their not the only manufacturer who has figured out how to make quick work of a 8-way tied coil spring seats.
In actuality your setting on the strings and not the springs. So eventually the strings will break at the inside edge of the seat rails. Try running your hand down a machined edge of piece of poplar wood. It will cut your hand as quick as a knife. This maynot happen for 1 year or 2 or 3 years,but the springs will pop lose just depends if they sanded the inside edge of the seat rails and the weight and use of the people sitting on the sofa. But it will eventually happen when tied in this manner.

But Casco Bay is not a manufacturer themselves, their furniture is contracted out. I always suggest to try and buy direct.


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RE: Casco Bay Leather Sofa

Quote "At least one has never been reported to them" this is something you need to understand about your suppliers. This trend of raising the seat rails is more recent ( 5 to 8 years est.) just depends on which manufacturer and which plant. I suggest you go to their plant and see their springup before the flw is applied, because its so very obvious, well to me anyway. They can drop-tie on the inside, and triple or quadruple the string on the front edge well help, but I dont see that on any of the photos.
All use the 100% nylon string, (better than hemp) but its still rough on the hands but very strong, so a cotton wrap softens it, but it takes longer to tie, just because of the thicker string.

I would doubt they could do a spring-edge 8-way tie, maybe but I doubt it would be done correctly. The art of 8-way tie is disappearing because of the costs to make correctly. Their is no better seating than a true 8-way spring edge seat. But the problem is its not done anymore. Well not in production based upholstery.

Right, and everybody copies everybody else in the industry, its just the consumer is left holding the bag.

So actually a sinuous wire seat is just as good now, but only if done correctly.


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Hard Edge or Spring Edge

I have been following this thread, as furniture construction is something I am very interested in.
I decided to do some research and called 4 manufacturers to learn their views on this issue, and would like to share what I have learned.

First some background information: There are two methods of piece good construction having to do with the front rail (the part of the frame under the front of the seat cushion). One is called "hard edge" construction and the other is "spring edge."

The "spring edge" is when the front rail is lowered by a few inches, the strings coming from the coil springs are attached to the rail, and a spring and wire are built on top of the rail. It is then padded and upholstered. The spring edge was popular in the 70's, 80's, and into the mid 90's and it was thought to provide a springy feel when you sat on the edge of the cushion.

The "hard edge" is when a solid piece of lumber is used that reaches the height of the coils. The string coming from the front row of coils is then attached to the top of this piece of lumber with spring up nails. The lumber and the string on the front rail is then covered and protected by a thick and durable cord about 1 1/2 in wide, called a "seat cord." It is then padded and upholstered. Manufacturers started using the seat cord in the mid 90's and by 2000 just about everyone had switched to it.

In my research I found that, the "spring edge" was abandoned by just about every manufacturer in the US due to the fact that it was problematical. According to people I talked to about this in the industry, the springs squeak and sag especially in the corners. The occupant of the sofa tends to fall forward out of the seat, but the main issue is cosmetic.

After a few years sofas just looked bad due to the action of the springs causing the leather or fabric on the front rail to wear and deteriorate. As time goes on, the spring gives out, causing the seat to become softer and softer, and making it difficult to get out of the seat especially for older folks.

There may be some piece goods out there with the "spring edge," but except for a few odds and ends and chairs, I do not know of a single manufacturer of 8-way, hand tied sofas or any type of sofa that still uses a spring edge on the bulk of their product line.

I spoke to a manager at Hancock and Moore (considered the benchmark in the industry as far as quality goes) and asked him why they use a hard edge rather than a spring edge and he told me, "I've been making high end furniture for 59 years and I don't use a spring edge. The spring edge starts to sag like an old horse. The hard edge is neater, cleaner and just as comfortable." He said he went away from the spring edge 40 years ago and just about everyone else has as well. He said a well-built, 8-way hand tied spring with a quality cord (string) could last 200 years and that he could not ever remember one of these breaking.


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RE: Casco Bay Leather Sofa

Im happy to see that readers here are avid in researching important issues, because furniture should be an investment. Knowing if you made a good investment before purchasing is very wise.
I will point out that a correctly built 8-way spring edge will last 20+ years without sagging, squeaking or...... and the seat cushions will wear and hold their shape much longer, compared to a hardedge. But its a pretty much mute point as not but a very few manufacturers can or will offer.
Their are other options for a spring edge. But most manufacturers are using a hardedge= extruded foam edgeroll, normally called ring-flex, varies from .75 to 1.5 inches thick.
The best upholstery craftsman to discuss these issues is with a re-upholsltery shop thats been around 35+ years. As they are the ones who repair these manufacturers defects or defects in their thinking of what lasts and dont last.
If you think about this, most people after having a sofa for longer than 3+ years, seldom ever complain to the manufacturer; its starting to sag, springs popping loose etc.
Most manufacturers are a bit isolated from the end consumer, they have sales representatives that are responsible for their retailers. Any issues are first dealt with the retailer, if needed escalated to the sales rep, then maybe to the manufacturer, but this is usually discouraged by many manufacturers to be involved.
My best suggestion is try and buy direct from the manufacture that will 100% stand behind their products.


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