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exterior door threshold

Posted by ionized (My Page) on
Wed, Jan 30, 13 at 15:09

What is wrong with this picture? (Click the thumbnail please)

 photo threshold_zpsbdc0a102.jpg

We are having flooring done at home and the carpenter installed a new threshold. That is the edges of the engineered wood flooring that can be seen between the metal and the recently-painted, gray sill. I have not talked to the contractor about this yet, but it looks all wrong to me. I am afraid that they will try to convince me that a little caulking is going to fix this right up, but that does not seem right either. The caulking will trap any water that might get in.

I would guess that some kind of weather-resistant wood or wood-like material needs to go on top of the sill to bring it up to the level of the threshold. It seems like it should be painted before it is installed and then touched up. OTOH, maybe the correct and best way is to install a new, thicker sill.

I am just waving my hands here and I could really use some advice from experienced people.

Thanks for reading.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: exterior door threshold

Totally wrong. The flooring should not extend to the outside. The saddle needs to 'bridge' the painted sill and the flooring. The flooring would need to be cut back the appropriate amount and a suitable height saddle fit and installed. You ideally want a wood or metal saddle with a vinyl weather strip as a part of the saddle. The door would have to be cut to the correct height to accommodate the new saddle with the weatherstrip.

Any competent carpenter can do this.


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RE: exterior door threshold

Thanks, I realized that this picture can be kind of hard to interpret. In addition, was not getting much action here so I posted in the Home repair section. I added another picture over there with some more descriptive narrative.

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/repair/msg0115571319584.html?2

glennsfc, should the interior side of the saddle sit on top of the flooring or do you mean to cut back the flooring so the saddle sits on the subfloor next to the floor? Right now the saddle is sitting on top of the floor and is not making it all the way to the sill. It seems like the sill is too short. What happened on the inside was that the old tongue and groove was removed, the subfloor planks were removed and replaced with plywood and engineered wood was put down.

The threshold does have a vinyl weatherstrip. That is the black layer visible just under the white door. What I hope is that they haven't cut the door off too much for a proper fitting of a threshold at this point or the door will have to be extended :-(


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RE: exterior door threshold

The interior saddle edge should sit on top of the flooring as it does now. But...the flooring should not extend all the way under the saddle to the outside, as it does in your picture. However, if the weatherstrip saddle fits well under the door and does the job, then no other adjustment to the door will be needed.

As I said before, the saddle is to 'bridge' the interior flooring and the outside sill. However, I have had to resort to adding wood pieces under the sill edge of a saddle to get the saddle to rest more 'level'...if you understand what I'm describing, and in those instances I used a solid oak strip to do that. In your case, the engineered flooring is what is under the saddle all the way to the outside, if I understand the picture, and is that which is doing the job keeping the saddle level. Your flooring does not end at the sill, but extends over it.

You could ask that the saddle be removed, the engineered flooring cut back and a solid oak strip or other solid weather resistant material used to fill the space that the engineered flooring does now...OR...leave it alone, provided that the weather strip saddle is properly fitted to the door bottom, and simply have the carpenter carefully caulk the gap and edge with an opaque silicone caulking compound. Most silicone caulks have a very long service life and will keep water out.


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RE: exterior door threshold

Thanks, the flooring does not quite go all the way to the outside edge of the saddle. It either does not extend that far or the outside edge of the flooring is below the level of the threshold. Either way, I am not sure that the threshold is supported properly given that the outside edge seems to be in free air.

I can also see daylight in a small space that is lower than the level of the flooring at one edge of the threshold so I have to take a closer look at that.

If I am to fully disclose all the facts, the door frame, if that is the correct term, is somewhat tweaked. The door closes fine, but if I look closely at it, I can see that it is not square. The left side seems to be somewhat sunken down into the sill. I DID tell the contractor that the carpenter should look at the door and determine if anything else should be done to make it as right as practically possible.


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RE: exterior door threshold

"...I am not sure that the threshold is supported properly given that the outside edge seems to be in free air."

You could force some hard-setting material to fill the gap, that way you get the edge supported and sealing done with the one product.

"The door closes fine,..."

Did the carpenter install the door also?


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RE: exterior door threshold

Thanks for responding. Space No, the door is old. It was just cut to fit the new threshold.

As I look at it this morning I see that the threshold is supported on the outside by the flooring. Is there supposed to be a gap between the flooring in the threshold underneath the saddle? As I look at it this morning, I can see the sill is flat, at best. I am concerned that water can back up under the saddle and not dry out if it is simply caulked.

The saddle doesn't really look like it was cut very closely to the door frame on the side. In some places between 1/8 and 1/16 inch gap even a half inch when looking at more like what is a molding on the inside. I'll try to post some pictures later.


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RE: exterior door threshold

As I tried to explain in my previous responses, the saddle is to 'bridge' the flooring and the sill. Then, yes, there usually is a gap (actually a break) between the flooring and the sill. Usually flooring does not extend over the exterior sill.

You need to discuss your concerns with the carpenter.


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RE: exterior door threshold

Thanks for responding. Space No, the door is old. It was just cut to fit the new threshold.

As I look at it this morning I see that the threshold is supported on the outside by the flooring. Is there supposed to be a gap between the flooring in the threshold underneath the saddle? As I look at it this morning, I can see the sill is flat, at best. I am concerned that water can back up under the saddle and not dry out if it is simply caulked.

The saddle doesn't really look like it was cut very closely to the door frame on the side. In some places between 1/8 and 1/16 inch gap even a half inch when looking at more like what is a molding on the inside. I'll try to post some pictures later.


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RE: exterior door threshold

Silly me, the unfinished wood under the threshold is not flooring. I should have looked more closely at it.


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RE: exterior door threshold

That may have been a flooring installer but he was no carpenter. Google up some door threshold products to see how it should be done.


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