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Wasp nest - Winter removal

Posted by Bydesignprez (My Page) on
Thu, Sep 12, 02 at 10:28

This could be a disaster, but we noticed a huge wasp's nest in a bush and we want to get rid of it. Being a kind soul (really!!), I left the wasps to do their business during this fall but at freeze up (we're on the Great Canadian prairies) I would assume that the wasps are frozen solid and I can safely dipose of the nest then. Is that correct?

As a curious person, how do wasps survive the winter to restart in the spring if they are all frozen and dead? Mosquitos I know, wasps are a bit of a mystery though.

Thanks


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Yes, you can do that, but it's more fun to light it on fire. The wasps crackle and "pop" like popcorn :o).

Wasps go dormant over the winter months. If it gets cold enough many of the new queens, that did not find adequate protection, will die. If you have a mild winter (for your locale) you will have a greater number of young nests. Without actual removal, a single nest can survive an indeterminate number of seasons as the queen is replaced yearly.

Personally, I prefer the nerve toxins to kill the nest while young. If one gets overlooked, I empty an entire can or two onto (and into) the nest to irradicate it. I had to do this to a hornet nest earlier this summer as it had grown to the size of a basketball.

Brian


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Thanks for the quick answer....I look forward to the first good frost then.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Wait until temps are consistently cool day and night or you'll be in trouble. They become drowsy when it's cool, but a warm day will bring them out.

If it were me, I'd wait until a really cold day.

I thought it was funny that you said they were in a shrub. Are you sure they're wasps and not hornets?

Saucy


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Sadly, the nest is adjacent to the pool and is in a tree/bush where the kids often throw rather large pool toys. The risk of a disaster is just too great. As love honey, I wish I could leave the nest alone but we are being swarmed with the creatures as it is.

I heard today that wasps are attracted to yellow.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Bydesignprez,

Since it appears to be a hazzard, you really should remove the nest now.

Wasps are attracted to anything that looks/smells like food (insects, rotting fruit, your dinner, etc.).

BTW, wasps do not make honey, only honey bees make honey. Many/most wasps eat other insects and don't even bother with nectar. What little nectar they do eat is consumed (instead of processed, like the honey bee).

Brian


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

And FYI they do sting for no reason! I got stung a week or so ago after one was buzzing merrily around the ladder I was on, and I naively thought if I mind my business, it will do likewise. Then I felt this buzzing in my bellybutton which was closely followed by searing pain. People can be allergic to those stings and even if they aren't multiple stings could be fatal. Destroy them now and don't look back. If you wait until late in evening when it's cooler and they are hardly moving, it shouldn't be a problem. You can spray the living daylights out of it, or make Jiffy Pop out of them :)(I would do option one- a noisy death is really obnoxious, and it's the main reason I will never host my own crab feast EVER again!) I like to be at one with nature as much as the next guy or gal, but I draw the line at any location where me or mine can get hurt. Pollenate anywhere you want, but make your home somewhere else or it's WAR.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

I'm with you ohforpetesake. I'm one of those "allergic" folks. Luckily for me, I'm not allergic to the point of requiring shots or medical attention (unless I get stung on the neck). I swell up pretty big, but it takes a couple days to reach "full swollen". The steriods and Bennadryl do nothing for me. I stay swollen for about 3 weeks. 3 years ago my son (then 2) stood on top of the exit of an underground wasp nest. They swarmed. I was working outside about 6ft. from him when I heard him scream. I had never moved so fast in my life. I had him across the street in about 5 seconds and was feverishly removing wasps from his body. Luckily for me I had heavy leather gloves on. I still got stung once on my wrist. My son had been stung in 7 locations, possibly multiple times in each location. 3 days later you could hardly find the places where he had been stung. I was just reaching my full size and couldn't bend my wrist, type, or make a fist. That was the first time that my wife had seen me get stung. Prior to that she didn't believe me when I told her how my body reacted to bee stings. She insisted that I take medications (including the shot) even though I told her they would not help. 3 weeks later (right on schedule) I was doing much better. Now she believes me :o).

Brian

So, if it was me, kill 'em!


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Obviously they are in a location where Bydesignprez does not want them. Others have physical reactions, children and pets. These are valid reasons for not wanting them near your house.

I just wasn't sure if people only had an impression of all wasps as 'bad' and to be eradicated and killed on sight. Believe me I've done in my share of yellow jackets. I 'discovered' the first nest right before we settled on our house. We were walking around the yard and I bent to pull some weeds from a rug juniper. You know it's hard to do all that signing at closing when your fingers won't bend.:^)

Silly me, after we owned the place and I had sprayed and filled in the hole, I proceeding to weed the other side of this particular flower mound a week later. 'Found' the other yellow jacket hole. You know it hard to unpack moving boxes when your fingers won't bend.

I've just never been stung by anything other than a yellow jacket (Dam* yellow jackets will sting you if you look at them) unless I swatted, or stepped on it. But that's just anecdotal. Obviously bees, wasps and hornets sting and can be dangerous...so you do what you have to do.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Some hornets are beneficial. Some additional reading may help sort things out.

Here is a link that might be useful: WV University website on Wasps and Hornets


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

I don't care about mud daubers... the version that builds mud tube nests or mud clump type nests unless they build in an unsightly location on the house. They have the ability to sting but mainly only use it to paralyze their prey 'spiders mainly' and take back to the nest for the young.

Paper wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, bumblebees,carpenter bees are a whole different ballgame. I will kill any that hang around my yard very long. I know they are beneficial in many ways... so are skunks but I wouldn't want one living under my deck or around my house either.

I had a friend when I was younger that liked to anger a nest and then ward them off with a racketball racket as they tried to sting him....he wasn't all there. I have learned that one easy way to get them is early in the morning when they are all settled in and slow movers to suck them off the nest with a shop vac and give a couple squirts of bug spray or wasp killer in the hose and shove the suction hose in the inlet port so none can go anywhere and shut it off for an hour or so. I did this at a location that I was worried the wasp killer might leave a stain on the house.

I do not recommend the racketball or tennis racket technique... if you pay much attention... the holes in the racket are big enough for a wasp to make it through.

I would recommend borrowing the neighbors shop vac one evening and sucking up a nest or two and shoving the vac hose in the inlet port and swiftly return it to the neighbors garage and go have a beer. Oh yeah and skip the wasp spray part... they aren't in your house or yard anymore, it don't matter.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

We found this during a bathroom renovation. It was inside our walls! Yikes!

Image Hosting by PictureTrail.com


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Golddust...that is a yellow jacket nest. Garbage bees. The ones you see swarm garbage cans and getting into pop and beer cans in the summer. And they are aggressive if disturbed. That nest looks like it had been abandoned but you want to caulk any areas that they may have been getting in there from outside.

As far as the OP and the wasp. Just take the thing out of there and destroy it. Why take the chance of you or some of the kids getting stung because you "are a kind soul" Think of other people. Those wasp really wouldn't care if they put someone into anaphylactic shock.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

Do not destroy the nest, leave it where it is, wasps are territorial and will not build in the area if they think there are wasps already there. this nest is now abandoned and will not be used again. Many garden centers now sell fake wasp nests to discourage any new nest building.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

I always see them first in my den where the fireplace is & believe that's where they are entering. Is there some type of bomb that I can place in the fireplace to kill them?


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

we`ve had contractors do some sofit & fascia this past week..unfortunately we covered up ( and sprayed foam ) into a wasps nest burrowed deep into the eaves of the house..thinkin that that would fix the problem...well these little guys are still active and are now trying to get out but since we blocked their entrance they are coming inside the house..twice we have woken up to a least a couple dozen swarming around inside the kitchen...inside !!!!!.. like being at an exorisim.....we just can`t figure out exactly where they are getting in....

we have opened up the hole outside to give them a way out...but there could be thousands up there..what should we do ????????????????


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

I HAVE RED WASP IN MY EAVES, THE OVER HANG AROUND THE ROOF. HAVE HAD THESE WASP FOR YEARS,I HAVE BEEN PLANNING ON REPLACING THE UNDER SIDE OF THE EAVES,BUT TO MANY WASP. I BOUGHT 9 CANS OF THE ROOM FOGGERS THAT KILLS WASP,THIS MORNING IT WAS 40 DEGREES OUT SIDE,SO I GOT MY CORDLESS DRILL WITH A 3/4 INCH BIT DRILLED NUMEROUS HOLES IN THE EAVES,TAPED THE FOGGERS TO A BROOM HANDEL,AND STUCK THE NOZEL IN THE HOLES,I WAS SURPRISED TO NOT SEE ANY WASP TRYING TO GET OUT. I"LL HAVE TO WAIT FOR A WARM DAY TO SEE IF THEY DIED.IF ANYONE HAS TRIED THIS LET ME KNOW THE OUT COME. POSTED 3/25/2011 OKLAHOMA CITY.


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RE: Wasp nest - Winter removal

I find the claim that wasps are territorial and will not build a nest near another nest very difficult to believe. In my garage on one 2x4 about 8ft long there is five paper wasp nests and they all seem to get along just fine.

We also found three active nests in the twine box on our hay bailer. (For those who don't know, the twine box is a metal cannister about the size of a laundry hamper that holds the bales of bailer twine).

It was also stated that honey bee's are the only bee's that make honey, but that is not true. Bumble bee's also make a form of honey, but they do not make a honey comb. Instead they put the honey in individual cells that look somewhat like out medical capsules. As a kid my brother and I tore a bumble bee nest apart and we located some of their honey cells, which we opened and examined the honey, then we got brave and actually tasted it. That is one mistake I can assure you I will never repeat. Ingesting just a couple drops of the bumble bee honey will make sicker that you have ever been before, and within a few hours you will become very acquainted with the toilet...LOL


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