Return to the Home Decorating & Design Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
The elusive "Wow Factor"

Posted by sapphire69 (My Page) on
Mon, Dec 10, 12 at 11:45

Also known as, the house guest that just will not leave.

I made the mistake of going through my DVR player this weekend without the recordings on mute and now I feel like I can't get my ears clean.

Everything from design shows to wedding shows were after this "wow factor" and at the end of each show, I was less than wowed. In virtually all of the cases, they just threw a boatload of money at the project but the elements that were included were much the same as any other project in that price range. I couldn't help but wonder if they'd ever watched the show they were on because they should have seen the same things done ad nauseam. In the cases where they did something different, it was something that didn't seem to make sense to me. For example, one kitchen had a diamond-encrusted exhaust hood over the island. Really? Or the house that had a large, well-appointed, manufactured cave room hidden behind a bookcase in the master bedroom. Why do I need an escape from my bedroom and how many people do I need to bring with me? Or the master bathroom that had a long bench seat that began at the tub and wrapped around the wall to the vanity. Are there often spectators in that bathroom? I could go on and on but it just seems to me that people have stopped trying to keep up with the Joneses; they now want to 'one-up' them and are willing to go to great lengths to do so.

When I used to work on weddings, I used to try to impress upon couples that their priority should be to make sure their wedding is a true reflection of who they are. I feel the same way about someone's home. My tastes are much different than most everyone I know but the highest compliment anyone can give me is that my house feels like me. I am going to great lengths to put together spaces that reflect my personality and style but there are no "wow factors" to speak of. And I'm okay with that.

So I have to ask:

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?
Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements?
Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces?
Will these "wow factors" still be "wow factors" in a few years?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

In my experience, the more "wow" there is now, usually the quicker the "ehh" factor follows.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Hmmm. Yes we wanted a wow factor in our home....a wow factor that created spaces that people wanted to spend time in...where they felt cozy and warm. We wanted a home that when people saw the outside, wondered what it looked like on the inside. Some place welcoming. Some place that took best advantage of the site.

I think that's quite a bit different from the "wow" factor they talk about on the shows which is just another way of saying "over the top". When wow = wild or crazy, then it's not wow to me...it's just crazy.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I am so tired of all of that on TV shows too. We seek also to make our home look really nice, but we want it all to be a reflection of who we are. I love the advice, "don't bring anything into your home that you don't love." early on in our marriage, I bought furniture and accessories that I thought I needed to have because they looked like everyone else's, were trendy, etc. Now I'm slowly selling and replacing all of that for things that are more suited to my personality.

And honestly, as a frugal person, I can't believe the amount of money they spend on things that do not make sense!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

This is such a great post. I am guilty of ever chasing the wow factor in my home. Many of my posts on here have been about that "wow factor".

Being that it is my first house, I struggle with trying to identify my tastes and my style, so I've keep searching and searching for something that will put my home and it's decor/style over the edge.

It was not until this past weekend that I stopped and looked around. I thought of the homes of my friends, family, neighbors. And I noticed, yes we all have such different tastes. But by golly, my house is really coming together. It may be mostly unfurnished and lacking in decor, but the bits and pieces that are there are FINALLY looking good. And you know what? I'm proud of myself.

I am beginning to let go of the wow factor. I see all these shows with so many unexpected combinations and "pops" of color, for so long this what what I was after. It's funny how my home is becoming more about whites and neutrals. The wow factor is the calming nature of my space, and I'm finally beginning to come to terms with that.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I'd just like to get past the current "ewwww" factor. We're miles from pursuing WOW.

I would not turn down a secret room though. I'll never be grown-up enough to not want that.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I am more for the "subtly and slowly reveals itself to be flawlessly executed without calling attention to itself" factor.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I think we sometimes forget that magazines and decorating shows are for the most part advertisements. Whether they are advertising a lifestyle or specific products, they are aimed at parting us from our hard-earned cash. I try to enjoy magazines and shows for their entertainment value and for their ability to transport me to a different place rather than allowing them to influence my lifestyle. I think it may be harder to avoid their influence when you are still developing your own vision and style and are in the process of furnishing your nest.

As for the celebrity excess shows and competition-driven shows, I don't find them interesting at all and I don't watch them. I'm happy for people to spend their money in whatever non-harmful way they want. Their spending provides jobs.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

The the only time I say Wow while watching TV is when I watch the Extreme Homes show.

And the only time I've heard wow from someone while at my home was when an OCD friend walked into our shop, a large building, that at the time was in disarray while holding a lot of DIL/DS's stuff during their move. :~)

I agree with Annie re: the wow factor.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I think the worst offenders are those "Crashers" shows, where a crew swoops in and under the guidance of some "designer" turns some poor young (always young) couple's family room into a Cozy Zen Modern Tuscan Caribbean Beergarden just perfect for entertaining. I feel like those poor people must be hypnotized for a few days. As the trucks pull away, the last carpenter out the door snaps his fingers and they're back in reality. Back in reality with staggered sections of 4x4s glued to their walls, a freakish mosaic fireplace and a TV platform hanging from chains and swinging in the middle of the room.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I've never cared about "Wowing" anyone, including myself. I neither want nor need "wow" -- I crave comfort and at least a small amount of charm, and that's pretty much it.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

1Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?
2Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements?
3Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces?
4Will these "wow factors" still be "wow factors" in a few years?

1 Yes. I like to wow myself and a select few others. I enjoy design and decor, and I like things that are different and unusual. I also bought a house that has a lot of wows to begin with.

2 Yes. We just had a holiday party this past weekend and I was so gratified at the details that certain people noticed and commented on. Most of the wows are for our setting, and I can take no credit for that really. But there are a few people I know who are artists and I really am pleased when they notice and like something I have done. But a lot of people probably do not like some of my choices, and that is fine.

3 That's not the kind of wow I like, but a lot of people want a "wow" that means, "hey, that looks just like the cover of such and such".

4 Most wows do not wear well. All of us probably think our "wows" are the exception. I think our setting and the very high quality materials in our house (wide plank flooring, cherry counters, (yes) marble, pewter counters, french range and all of our stone walls and patios, etc) have "wow" quotients that will hold up well. But what I think will date us very soon is my penchant for that industrial/vintage/distressed look, which I have in a few pieces of furniture and in lighting.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I would Love to have a "WOW" family room. A space that looks like Candice Olsen designed it and that money was no object in the furnishings of it.
I think I want that "WOW" because I miss my old house that was a WOW house in design/layout. I will never be able to get that feel in my new house. So, if I can get one room to feel really good and just makes me say Ahhhh, I would feel so much better.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

To me, the biggest wow factor is a fantastic location/view. The decor inside the home can rarely compete with that, nor should it.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?

Nope, the view and setting is our "wow factor", and we designed our house to be wowed with the view from every room, so no attached garage, meaning lots o' windows on all 4 sides.


Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements?

Yes to the view and setting, not as much to the house. I like color, texture and layering, so wow often comes out as "Wow there's so much to look at", which is sometimes a compliment and just as often not, but we don't care, we like our house and style and aren't in it to wow anyone else.

Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces?

Not to me, so I am no fan of gray walls, blue and brown or all white kitchens for my house, they are great for others, though, it's all in what turns you on.

Will these "wow factors" still be "wow factors" in a few years?

Nope, we all get inured to everything, it's human nature, but we go and find new wow factors, it's what makes life interesting.

Also, we don't have cable, never have, so I have only caught snippets of HGTV shows, and honestly, I have been summarily unimpressed with all that I have seen, I still like This Old House, which thankfully comes in via antenna.

sandyponder


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Perhaps that's what I miss most about the old HGTV shows...rather than WOW they focused on design principles that would get you to creating your own personal style that would be well executed as Pal suggested. That would create your own personal wow.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?

Nope. No one but me has to like it. I'm not out to impress anyone!

Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements?

They say "Wow" just because it's a 232 year old house


Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces?

No, I like different. Once everyone is doing it, it's so over for me!


Will these "wow factors" still be "wow factors" in a few years?

Yep it will still be hundreds of years old and still have the wonderful paneling that's 2 feet wide and runs the length of the walls. It will still have floor boards that are just as long and wide. It will still have a fireplace in every room. It will still have an attic that looks like a barn since it's a post and beam building. It will still have Indian shutters and gunstock corners. It will still have granite walls for the foundation that are the basement walls and 2 brick arches in the basement supporting all the fireplaces.


Now if I could just find a place to add another bathroom!!!!!! :)


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I have gotten a few wows and I am flattered by it because I really work hard to make my house understated and unique. And hopefully I can differentiate between "wow" as in "I have no idea what to say about this monstrosity" and "this is so unexpected and beautiful". :)

I agree that a great architectural space helps a great deal. I think wow is harder to accomplish in a builder grade tract house but it can be accomplished.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I don't really care about creating a space that make other people say "Wow". What I'm looking for in my space is something that makes me say "wow" when I enter a room. My goal is to eradicate the things in my house that I'm using as fillers (ie, the vase that's sitting on a table, not because I like it, but because I had nothing else to put there), and just surround myself with the things I love. I'm trying really hard to be patient and wait until I find the "right" whatever, even if it means living with visual emptiness for a while.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

A genuine wow factor is not really a problem, but the jumped up flashy ones get a bit tiresome.

deedee I am a bit depressed about the spectacular location/view wow factor. So few people have these.

The location of my next house is perfect in many ways, but it is also along a bus route and hookers hang out on the corner nightly according to tweets from one of the current renters.

The view is spectacular from the terrace at the top of the house if you go out on it, but from inside the house you see brick wall 8 feet away, brick wall 8 feet away, top of saplings out front and brick houses about 30 feet across the street.

And the outside of the house is kinda ugly.

I hope I get to have some made-up wow factor inside :(


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Rafor, I still remember a little glass house you built. It said "wow" to me ... and the rest you describe sounds very very wowy! Have you posted pics?


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Pal.

Your refrigeration wowed me in your last place. So I think you can wow just about anything.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

The view is spectacular from the terrace at the top of the house

That would wow me

it is also along a bus route and hookers hang out on the corner nightly,

and that would really wow me, this sheltered denizen of the woods that I am....


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I'm in the "ahhhh..." rather than the "wow" camp.

What pleases me is when a visitor says, "I just love being in your house." What I try to do is give every view or corner something to please the eye in a balanced whole. I want everything to feel harmonious, as though everything in the room belongs there. There are many lovely ways to assemble a room, but the people I most try to please in our own house is...us!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Once my youngest brother came over and said "wow" that is a lot of color. I don't think he really meant it as a good thing :)


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Seems like everyone here is more into pleasing the full time residents rather than the visitors, which is exactly how I am!

@fori - I would also love a secret room but not one that branched off from my bedroom. I have an outbuilding in my back yard that I will restore one day and my dream is to build a hidden tunnel from the basement of my house to the outbuilding!

@Fun2Bhere - I agree that the shows and magazines are advertisements but the line is forever blurred for a lot of "regular" people. I know too many people whose homes look like they went and bought all of the most expensive elements they could find to assemble in their rooms. The rooms look well appointed but have a very distinct "seen this a thousand times" feel to them.

@Annie - I agree completely about the old HGTV. I went without cable for years so I just caught the tail end of the good stuff. I enjoyed watching Candice's use of space and Sarah's mixing of patterns. Now, I don't even turn to it.

@rafor - Reading your post, I said 'Wow!' without even thinking about it! Your home sounds beautiful! Mine is about a hundred years younger without as much remaining character but I'm working on it.

@palimpset - I don't have that setting to lay claim to either so I try to make up for it on the inside. I do have a really good view of the fireworks from my front porch so I cling to that!

@stephf - You have just given me a new phrase - visual emptiness! I love it! Like you, I'm unwilling to stick something in a space just for the sake of having something there. So, as of right now, there is a lot of visual emptiness in my house but I'm okay with that.

Like many of you, I like things that are a little different. My design aesthetic leans heavily toward traditional with a dash of Hollywood regency. My goal is for my rooms to look warm and cohesive; put together without looking staged. And a little Wabi Sabi thrown into the mix! This is my first (and my last!) home so I'm taking my time to make sure it speaks to me in the way I intended it to. I'm also very frugal and as much as 95% of everything you see in my home is used so not much 'wow' going on there. But people feel at home when they come over and that is what makes me feel good.

@jkjones77 and jakabedy - Don't ever watch Million Dollar Rooms on HGTV. It may take days for you to stop shaking your heads!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I think there is a fine line between "wow" and ostentatious.

I couldn't care less what anyone else thinks of my home. My goal is to make it as functional and comfortable as possible for those who live in it...and that includes the dogs! If I hit the lottery I might upgrade a few things, but I wouldn't change much.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I'd really like to feel thrilled by my home. But I guess that's not reasonable.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I agree with everyone who would rather have an "Ahhhh" rather than a "Wow". One of the nicest things a guest said to me was that our home was very warm and inviting. Nothing is done or brought in for the "look at this!" reaction. I like to look at pretty things, but if someone else isn't taken with them that's ok. My family and I are here everyday, so it needs to give us what we need/want.

It's really nice when someone else get's that feeling, though.

Although, my mom did use "wow" when I sent her a pic of my mantel decoration for Christmas. But then, she's influenced my style quite a bit so it makes sense that she'd like it! We both walk the line between just the right amount of stuff and over the top...and tend to lean toward OTT.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I want my house to be pretty - my kind of pretty. The kind that makes me smile and feel totally contented when I come home. And since my house was built in 1908, the pretty has to look good with my house too. So I have a lot of second hand pieces, or inherited pieces - all modest and all loved.

I see lots of houses/rooms that "wow" me; the styles could be anything, but it is a house/room that is so well put together that you say "wow" when you see it. It isn't about flashy or trendy, modern or retro, expensive or cheap. It is about color, texture, balance and uniqueness, especially uniqueness. For me, that is it.
Diane


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Palimpsest, I chuckled at your use of "jumped up."
A useful British concept, and something I heard a lot growing up.

The four degrees of social death in my part of the South, in order of deadliness, were showy, tacky, common, and trashy.
Wow, indeed...


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I want my house to make me feel as if I want to be in it. I want people to feel comfortable taking off their shoes and curling up on the couch, or resting their feet on the coffee table.

People are often impressed by our house--not the furnishings so much as the house itself--the floor plan and great room are, well, great :-) I have to admit I enjoy that.

I will say that almost everyone loves my kitchen--and it gets "wow"s a lot. I love my kitchen, too--it is exactly what I wanted and there isn't anything I'd have done differently (unless we could have upgraded the budget a huge amount). But nothing was done for "show". I'm a form follows function type--it is an incredibly usable kitchen.

So, I admit I enjoy the praise--but I think it comes from designing and building a house we'd love, and then other people end up admiring it.

I don't need extra seats in the shower, though--we don't entertain in our bedroom or bath!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Sometimes I think these shows confuse "Wow Factor" with "Fear Factor".


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I've just been reading the, "Little House on tne Prairie," series to my DD and there is a part where they've made friends with a wealthy family across the street. Even though they are living in a few small rooms above a store, the wealthy neighbours spend many hours at their house and say something along the lines of "we hope you don't mind us always coming over, but your house is just so homey that we feel comfortable here and don't like to leave." That is the WOW factor I hope to create.

I don't like flashy and prefer quality like old wide-plank floors, but I am definitely wanting WOW. It's just that for me, WOW is a great down-filled cushion in awesome linen fabric rather than a diamond encrusted range hood. Does WOW have to be tacky?


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I want my home to say "wow" as well as "ahhh" to us and guests alike. The best compliment I can and do hear is "I don't want to leave". It's a feeling as much as anything, I think. One of comfort and cheerfulness. My goal is to not have my spaces look like all my neighbors who have very nice homes but they are so "safe" in their decor choices that they tend to all look alike, ie brown and boring. I'm a very visual person and enjoy the feeling of walking from one room to another in our home and thinking how happy each one makes me.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I don't think there is anything the matter with "wow" or "flashy" but usually when you look at houses that contain these, the money shots are isolated from each other and the house as a whole lacks cohesiveness and a real identity.

The diamond range hood wood not be so bad if there were diamonds interspersed throughout the house as pave cabinet hardware and that sort of thing. But this is rarely the case. You have this "Wow" whatever it is and then you walk through a lot of plain ole vulgar and probably pretty cheaply tricked out real estate to get to the NEXT big wow three rooms away. They usually skimp on the passage way from Wow A to Wow B because A and B are so extravagant even they can't afford to keep the bar raised.

Very rarely does the "Wow" seeker build a little jewel box of a house where everything is perfection and at the same level of quality. They build warehouses with bits and pieces of super expensive stuff nailed up here and there.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?

I would never seek a "wow" that was trendy and it's not something I've consciously sought. When we planned this house I wanted a house plan that was a little different and since I was born under Aquarius I always just want to do my own thing with the decor. My decorating goals with any house we've lived in has been to make it comfortable and our personal "home" using my creativity and not following too many trends. I've always loved returning to all my various homes.

Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements?

Many people have expressed amazement and some have almost been speechless as the house has features most people don't expect by looking at the outside.

Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces?

Not for me.

Will these "wow factors" still be "wow factors" in a few years?

The "wow" factor of the views through every window and the architecture of my house are lasting. I expect I may tire of some of the decor features I have altho I tend to keep things for a very long time.

IMO TV design shows have deteriorated over the last several years to the point I seldom even think about checking to see what's on.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

The "wow" that is portrayed in shows is hit and miss. The entrance may get that response, or the kitchen, master bedroom. It really is hit and miss because of their exposure to the "how to sell your house fast" shows. Most people aren't that invested in their surroundings. They don't make the effort to create harmony throughout their home because they aren't emotionally connected to it. The people who frequent these forums ARE interested in forging that connection and will create wonderful spaces because they desire more than another's reaction.
Home is far more important than display.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I would disagree that you can't have a "WOW" view and a "WOW" house. I think I have both (no credit given to me, it was built 120 years ago). I also think that the house calls for a certain "wow" factor as we go about restoring it to it's original WOW :)

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?
Yes, it was a bed and breakfast prior to my living in it. It already had some wow but was missig quality wow as the wow's came from 100's of guests who tromped through it weekly.

Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements?
Ya, my favorite is a bookcase we purchased in Seattle. It's 11 feet high and about 15 feet wide, all antique glass, pretty cool and we got it for a steal. I have it filled with silver....silver plate mostly, but beautiful stuff, layered and layered (or as DH would say, stuffed in there so full you worry it might tumble if you open the door). People say "wow" and my favorite saying..."Is that family silver" Sure, heh heh, someone's....most of it I got at the goodwill :p But honestly, I love silver and that cabinet full of silver gives me a personal wow feeling. I just think it's pretty and it makes me smile...that's wow to me I guess.

Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces?
I wouldn't be able to say I've seen much of what wow's me in ten thousand other spaces. I think it helps that my home is victorian, which narrows you down to maybe 1000 spaces :p and because I have "space" to develop a wow that would be harder in a smaller space.

Will these "wow factors" still be "wow factors" in a few years? They're not in fashion now, so likely they will still be wow's later :) That's the fun of antiques.

We have other "wow's". A bedroom set that is spectacular (came with the house). A gorgeous bronze sculpture of a nude with a big butt :) She makes me happy as we share that feature LOL A few pieces of art...but mostly our wow's are related to the house and as such, being 120 years old, they're probably still going to be wow's in 100 years. I also think my garden is a wow...but maybe that's just because it gives me such pleasure. Sitting in the garden surrounded by peony or hydrangea depending on the season, with a glass of wine, watching a sail boat race out front and enjoying the architecture...that wow's me.

Most of my wow's have to be given credit to the original builder of our home. I still think "Wow" when I think of what they accomplished 120 years ago for ten grand. Pretty danged impressive.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Like most people here, I'm shooting for the "ahhh" factor more than the "Wow!" factor. However, I hope to add a little Wow in 2013 or 2014 with some artwork. Nothing too crazy, but hopefully some abstract something that people notice and think, "oooh, different ... neat ... I think I like it ..."

That's as close to "Wow" as I want to get, I think :)


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Trying too hard won't get you a wow factor or even a short ahhhh! A true *wow* is unpretentious and usually more 'earthly', hence a view or fantastic property, though not necessarily a manicured lawn. It should also be unexpected, kind of like a great surprise ending of a movie~you walk out and you're in awe, since you never saw it coming.

The row houseVictorians that stand on the hillsides of San Francisco always amaze me~how can I not say, WOW?


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

No wows here, only comfort and relaxation.
My house is for ME.

The world can be a terrible and scary place and IMO "HOME" should be the antidote to everything negative in the world. I want all of my troubles to fall away when I enter my house and be replaced by feelings of security, comfort, and love.

I care not what anyone else says or thinks when they walk into my house. Sure it is great to get positive responses and praise for your style but ultimately that does not affect my enjoyment of the space one iota.

Function is also very important to me- things have to accommodate all the people and animals that live here.
There must be a place to set a drink next to each seat.
I must be able to put my feet up.
It must be easy to keep clean.
No cat unsafe tchotchkes to worry about.
Nothing (i.e. coffee table) a giant breed dog tail could wipe out.
I want all those little things that make life easy near but not visible, so a stash for nail file, spare glasses, hand lotion, a pen and paper etc. in each room near my favorite chair.
I want to use and enjoy my heirloom pieces, not keep them in a closet.
And so on.

I should also add that I do have a totally "WOW" yard as landscaping and gardening is my passion.
The WOW is when they pull into my driveway- most people who come in my house are too busy looking out the windows at the gardens to pay much attention to what is going on indoors. I get ten times the visitors to see the yard as I do to come inside.
Even then, when you cross the threshold into the house the world kind of falls away and you are bathed in relaxed yet functional comfort.
Works for me.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I did chase the Wow factor at first. I looked at Pottery Barn publications and others where they would have something like a giant clock on one wall in black or something that created a lot of contrast. But when I started thinking about it, I realized I would get tired of seeing that day after day and for me it wouldn't have longevity. Now I focus on comfort, organization- since my house is small, and a mix of things that I think will be most satisfying to my eye for the long run. Good Topic!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

No "wows" here. We live in a house that looks like most of our in-town friends' houses. Our town was mostly built in the 1920s so almost everyone within a certain income range lives in a center entrance Colonial with a medium sized foyer, dining room on the left or right, and living room opposite, kitchen in the back. Many have kitchen/family room additions but mostly not "wow" type additions, because lots are small. We do often get a "wow" for our addition, because it is a great one (in my humble opinion). Not because it's huge but because it has given us a really great space to hang out or have a party. Also, you can't see it when you approach the house, so it's sort of a surprise when you walk in the front door. The other thing people comment on is our artwork. But in general we don't have the sort of house people say "wow" about.

"The 'ahhh' faotor" -- I like that! That is what I'm going for, as well. I just want to be comfortable, and want my guests to be, too.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Not that I've tried to do so, but I'm pretty sure I lack the know-how to create a "wow" factor house or room.

Even if I were to try, I think one problem with going for "wow" is that, as the majority of eveyone here has pointed out, the effect could prove exhausting after a while, i.e., I probably wouldn't want to go for it for myself.

Of course, pal is correct as well. As usual. :) What's the point of creating a wow factor in one room but allowing the rest of the house to remain its plain old self? That's what would happen, since we don't have the budget for a whole house "wow" redo. Doing one wow room but not others, and I can imagine people's responses: "WOW, that's amazing! ....When are you going to finish the rest of the house?"

Also, to attempt to wow others implies that I could possibly know what would wow all of them. I barely know what I like! How could I possibly please - and wow - everyone else?


 o
Not fair, luckygal & cearbhaill! / RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

"Many people have expressed amazement and some have almost been speechless as the house has features most people don't expect by looking at the outside."

"I should also add that I do have a totally "WOW" yard as landscaping and gardening is my passion....most people who come in my house are too busy looking out the windows at the gardens to pay much attention to what is going on indoors. I get ten times the visitors to see the yard as I do to come inside.
..."

You dangle those delicious tidbits before me, but just out of reach! How I'd love to see a few images!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

This is the view from my kitchen windows- not everyone's taste but it is designed first to exercise giant breed dogs, second to please my eye, and third be semi easy to maintain.
Again, function wins out :)

More photos linked below.

Here is a link that might be useful: yard stuff


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I went threw a phase in my twentys where every thing had to be a wow factor and I had great fun doing and redoing my house every time a new design or color trend caught my eye. I was never into cloths but I sure had fun with the house. I finally settled very happily into a country house decor. Now with this house its a 1915 and I want to honor that and want to draw people into it in a welcoming way so I,ve gotten quite with the design of the stuff in it and I,m content too let the house speak for itself. We did go for a WOW in the kitchen with the two toned woodwork but there was simply no way I was going to talk my husband out of that. With so much of the house itself needing remodled and brought back to what it should be he felt we needed a WOW room to detract from all the in process stuff going on. Thats one thing about these older homes if you want to be true to them nothing happens in a hurry.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Igloochic: I think I have driven by your house. If it's the place I am thinking of, it would be a shame to un-WOW it. I mean, you really couldn't if you tried!

I think some houses, locations have a natural wow.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

"...my favorite is a bookcase we purchased in Seattle. It's 11 feet high and about 15 feet wide, all antique glass, pretty cool and we got it for a steal. I have it filled with silver....silver plate mostly, but beautiful stuff, layered and layered (or as DH would say, stuffed in there so full you worry it might tumble if you open the door). People say "wow" and my favorite saying..."Is that family silver" Sure, heh heh, someone's....most of it I got at the goodwill :p But honestly, I love silver and that cabinet full of silver gives me a personal wow feeling. I just think it's pretty and it makes me smile...that's wow to me I guess."

Could you pretty please post a pic of this beauty? I also collect silver (mostly from yard sales) altho your collection sounds even more amazing than mine. Love to see it.

Cearbhaill, thanks for posting pics of your garden - it really is a wow.

I totally forgot about my garden and have had friends literally say wow when they saw it this year as it's had quite a lot of work done. Even more improvements to do so I don't yet say wow. I think there are some of us who don't think in terms of wow-ing anyone with our homes or gardens. We probably are less (or not at all) concerned with other's opinions.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

cearbhaill that certainly is a lovely view. I have a similar view from my kitchen...I wish I had the same view out front.

I'm a gardener too and I think I do very well in that area! Inside though, it's about comfort, function, and anything that is my idea of "pretty".

I'm going to redo my guest bath soon and it is going to be all pink! I suspect I'll get many wows, though they may not be signs of approval. But I've been the only female in this house for 30 years and darn it I'm going to have some pink now!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

The only "wow" factor I wanted was the view out of our windows. I want the inside of my house to flow well, have all of its parts relate proportionately, and make sense with its historic style. If anyone should walk through my house and say, "wow, it feels like this house was built x-amount of years ago (ideally at least 150 years)" I will be ecstatic. Otherwise, the wow factors my family and friends are looking for are the last things I want in my house. My copper cupola is in full oxidation mode right now and someone recently told me it would look really impressive if we could keep it shiny all the time. I then knew they had no idea what I'm going for with this project.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I'm with palimpsest: I am more for the "subtly and slowly reveals itself to be flawlessly executed without calling attention to itself" factor.

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces? No. The current house has a "wow" spaciousness and a "wow" bookcase wall, and a "wow" backyard size, but it's all a result of lifestyle dictating lot and house choices.

Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements? Yes! Although "woah ... " is a close second. With the bookcase the followup question is inevitably, "Have you read all these?"

Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces? I suppose it would be, which is why we avoid chasing trends and working with personal taste instead.

Will these "wow factors" still be "wow factors" in a few years? No, the current "wow" granite will be dated, the distressed furniture will just look shabby and dated, and the industrial imitations will have fallen apart.

This post was edited by lazygardens on Tue, Dec 11, 12 at 17:05


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I agree with many of the postings. A gorgeous view gets the biggest "wow" from me when looking at home photos no matter how gorgeous the interior. I just finished a kitchen remodel and found an interior designer who could use what I love and give it "wow" power. She suggested copper and black grasscloth in the back of a lit display cabinet in my kitchen and copper glass tiles for my backsplash. Another idea, she had me hang my two antique leaded glass windows from the ceiling where two open cut out areas just happened to be in an interior wall. Not much more cost than if I had not hired her, but the look is stunning. So yes, I purposely went after the wow factor, but in an elegant way that is me.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Rosy, it's first name is James...is that the one? :) I love my home as you can probably tell. We are VERY honored to be the first family in it since the owner died in 1920 and as with many folks in old homes, we do feel a great responsibility to do right by the joint :)

Of course we have other wow's...""Wow, the roof is leaking again?" "Wow, look at the electric bill!" "wow, what the hell were we thinking" :) But when the weather is nice and the leaks dry up we love it LOL

Lucky I'll take a photo tomorrow when I get home. We tripped over the bookcase in Seattle at a store going out of business and got it for a steal...then found out how much it would cost to move it :o Ooppssss DH thought it was for books LOL Silly man :) We'll have to share pics :) I'm always looking for imaginative ways to decorate with silver. Mind you...only when it's polished (I'm due to spend a week catching up on it soon...I normally let it go black for Halloween and then polish for CHristmas)

IT's funny to read this thread. To me "WOW" isn't something modern typically, but then I'm living in a victorian so perhaps that's personal. Wow comes to mind for me when I see a great piece of art, fabulous old farm cupboard, gad a plow with flowers spilling out from it on a country drive. I think real wow or lasting wow comes from the things that make me smile and appreciate life's beauties.

And of course Harrison Ford....


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

igloochic: it wasn't the one I was thinking of, but now that I've seen it online I recognize it. I think I know every old house in that town, it's one of my favorite "house stalking" places. My poor husband gets so tired of driving around those streets going two miles an hour while I ogle houses and gardens. Both of my children were born in the hospital there.

I live on an island about 45 minutes south of you. We are fixing up an old farmhouse and I go to Vintage Hardware frequently for house parts.

Love your town and your home. Are you planning on being innkeepers, or are you turning it into a family home?

Ok, to get back on topic: I completely and unabashedly admit that I love the wows I get from other people. I love to hear what people say about my house while they are walking by and they don't realize I'm gardening on the other side of the hedge. We have an annual bike race on our island and it has been so fun to hear the bikers talking about my house as they ride by. They comment on how much work we've done and what has changed from the previous year.

I love curb appeal!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

There are a couple blogs that I frequent and am in love with many of the homes....the entire flow of style. I have never thought "wow", more "gads, do I love this home". It is never something specific, more of the overall setting. One was a craftsman home that had all of the woodwork and wood built ins completely stripped and restored to their original. This in itself would be a "wow" factor to include the amount of work, love and honor for the original home.

So, yes a "wow" factor can be there, but for me it includes the overall feeling. As with many of you, I fit with the "ahhh" factor. I want to come home or visit another where the decor inside or outside just calls to me.

The best compliment I ever received was from my son. He told me it was always wonderful to come home because he felt so comfortable even though the house was OCD (husband) mixed with my decor. My husband had wonderful taste and was open to mine with love, just don't move/change anything once in place or a logical discussion had a solid reason.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

cearbhaill: Wow. :)

I am very wowed by what you've done. I haven't had time to look at all the images carefully, but I see how much planning and thought you've put into the garden. I see you have a plant list, too, and I'll be looking at that with great interest!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I was a guest recently in a very nice home with such a gorgeous setting, a beautiful with great curb appeal, a front door at the top of the crescent shaped ascending steps, and the eventuality of a beautiful autumn wreath as if it was made from the setting, which was a wooded area, and the address gave a clue, that it was a wooded estate, not a house in the burbs or city. The house was not really large, maybe 4000-5000 sq ft.
The great room was truly a family room and there were two banks of French doors/windows one on either side of a huge fireplace that cast a glow about the room on a cool dark rainy afternoon, and which looked onto the nearby wooded area, an organic feast for the eyes with every color leaf in the crayola box. The home owners were a building contractor and his stay-at-home wife (now empty nesters).
I noted that the home's interior had not been upgraded since the 1980s of wallpaper and color scheme, tile or cottage cheese ceiling, but that was the last thing I noticed.
The first was that it had good curb appeal and on entry, it smelled clean, not from candles or sprays but clean. The second thing I noticed was the gorgeous view from the great room with a huge fireplace (fire burning) situated between the banks of French windows/doors looking out onto the wooded setting. The spic-and-span clean tile of 30-40 years ago was as clean as if it was laid yesterday. I noticed the beautiful crystal and silver within eye shot of my seat, of a well-appointed DR, furnishings which were heirloom, probably from a century or so ago but well kept in an immaculately clean house. Normally the Shumacher wallpaper from 1985 would have bothered me, but in this house it seemed not just appropriate, but a classic as if it were meant to remain for all times, standing in a moment in time, gave me the feeling that I might perhaps be an extra in a movie filing the set from a filming of a nice family such as Mr. Smith goes to somewhere, whose housekeeper was out of sight (this lady is her own housekeeper), enjoying a cool homecoming afternoon in a beautiful home, kept warm by the cozy fireplace while someone served cider, cookies, cheese straws and wine. Ahhhh. I never thought I would feel so good in a house with wallpaper and tile so dated, but I wanted to move in, good clean smell, view and all.
I think I found the wow factor, but it is not easy to describe in one word or one item.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

It wasn't intentional but we did add a "wow factor" to our house, which is the fireplace. Everyone here's seen it, so no need to post it again. After we were without power for 30 days, we knew then we were going to build a FP that would heat almost the whole house. And boy did we ever! lol. And since it's also a cooking FP, it's pretty big.

The first thing people say when they walk in is, "Wow." FP's like our's isn't common around here because it was custom made.

And then there's my kitchen floor. :)


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

We redid our house a couple of years ago and my goal when it came to the finishing touches and decorating was to have people like being in the space without knowing why. And first of all that included my family. I generally find WOW factors as defined and shown on TV to be jarring and out of sync with the rest of the space. There is a certain "look at me" to them and as mentioned by Pal no cohesiveness to the rest of the house.

We put a copper mosaic backsplash behind the stove in our kitchen. As much as I love it because it's different I have had to work at making it a part of the house. Fortunately I already had a copper wall clock, so I added a hammered copper bowl for fruit, the WT over the sink window have the colours in them that copper will become and those colours have been carried into the rest of the living space. Is it a WOW factor - no - because I've made sure that it isn't. I don't want a "diamond range hood".

I remember a kitchen being posted a few months ago by someone just popping in and out (don't remember the name) and it had about 20 (slight exaggeration but it's what it felt like) WOW factors, focal points and I just did not like it. BUT, I would have loved to have seen the rest of the house to see if that was actually the decorating style of the owner, that Over The Top (for me) look.

@luckygal - yea, every once in a while I, too, find that Aquarius sensibility kind of taking over. That sensibility where people look at you and say "What?" and you have to rein yourself in, or not.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

No, I don't want a WOW factor.

I worked for several years on my floorplan and when I sent the finalized plans to the architect to draw up and fine tune, these were the instructions:

"We want an elegant and comfortable home that reflects us, not ostentatious."

We always said we would build and decorate this home exactly as we have if no one ever set foot in it but us.

Most people that visit comment that our home is beautiful, but very welcoming and comfortable. The views are great as there is a water view from absolutely every window in the house, front back, and side--the goal was to bring the outside in while still making the inside cozy and able to stand on it's own.

The WOW factor just isn't for me, but it's fun to look at them for a moment or two in someone else's home. That's about it.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

What an interesting thread! Sapphire, you had me laughing and nodding my head in agreement as I read through your initial posting! And I agree that most decorating shows today that go for the Wow Factor, end up with something tacky or totally ridiculous.
Yes, I agree that there can be "Wow" homes, but I personally wouldn't want one. I think the upkeep to keep it a "Wow" would be a PIA. What I try for in our home is beauty, comfort and harmony for myself and my family.
As long as we're happy, that's all that really matters. I collect art, but never buy to impress anyone. Heck, I sometimes don't even give much thought to whether DH will like it . . .just as long as he doesn't actually hate it. It just has to speak to me and make me very happy.

But, I do have major "Wow Factor views" in every direction here. I can take no credit for it, though (LOL). Mother Nature gets that one.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

But Lynn, your home IS a wow factor! lol. In a good way, just like my FP. Everytime I see your rooms, especially the FP's, I go "wow."

The Wow Factor doesn't have to be in your face and stick out like a sore thumb.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I think palimpsest put the finger on exactly what I've seen in many of the 'wow factor' homes that I've been in. The 'wow' does not extend through the entire house. I also see it a lot on the message boards that I visit around kitchens and baths. Posters go to great lengths to search out the 'right' fixtures and finishes and post the rooms over and over again for everyone to see. But when you get to see the other areas in the house, they seem to be totally disconnected from the 'wow' room, even with open floor plans.

I'm all about function when I start to put together a room. I avoid pieces that seem to be there strictly as a style identifier (that starfish in the cottage home or the RH hardware lantern in the old home, etc.). I really like demifloyd's approach of decorating as if no one will ever set foot in the home but me!

What's funny is that if you talk to my friends and family, they will tell you that I'm all about the 'wow' factor because I'm very specific about what I want and don't want. They confuse my willingness to live with 'visual emptiness' rather than settle for something that will fill the space with trying to create a showplace. Makes me very grateful that it's my name on the deed and not theirs!

Like powermuffin, I am captivated by well put together rooms. Not in a magazine spread kind of way but in the way that a room can evoke an emotion or emit personality. For my own home, I want people to go by it and fully expect some 90-year old lady to burst out of the front door, all dolled up in some no-name classic outfit and hop on her Vespa and speed away, laughing hysterically!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?

We compromised on exterior to gain interior wow. And I don't regret it. Great views are great - being perched on a mountain or gazing at the ocean, but I live inside (especially in this climate) and the comfort, security and cohesion of my interior space will always be paramount. No one will be visiting to see my small patch of backyard.

Is it really a "wow factor" if you've seen the same thing in ten thousand other finished spaces?

I think that people that immerse themselves in design and decor can overestimate the interest of others outside that sphere. I would propose that most people don't consider wow and even when they see even the most commonly used magazine tactics cannot readily identify them.

Did you seek to add "wow factors" to your spaces?

This summer we rented a cottage in the Lake District of England. An old, stone built barn conversion split. It was modestly outfitted but sat nestled in the fells - soaring mountains all around, it was a short walk across sheep filled fields to a pretty little village. It was truly a wow environment stepping backing in time, walking the edges of lakes, visiting the homes of Wordsworth and Beatrix Potter. I can appreciate those kind of surroundings and history. But throughout the day we would return to the old cottage for meals in the ikea fitted kitchen, we would freshen up, check the olympic medal progress. The comfort of the well used sofas, the layers of lighting, caring for family that popped in, and the roaring fire seemed equally if not more important, on a human level. I obsessed about 'wow' when selecting this temporary residence both inside and out and got it. I think the vacation was much the richer for it.

Do people say 'Wow!' when they see these elements?

I want to delight my senses when entering a room that I have created, and everyone else's too. I consider while creating each room what my guests impressions will be, how it will flow for a party, how large family dinners will work. Those things are only a handful of times a year, but they really matter to me. And it is truly gratifying to have people notice the wow touches I have injected, as they have over the past 3 weekends when the house was filled with gatherings and parties. A techie friend marvelling at my faucet? AWESOME. People asking the material of my countertops I feel like I opened some eyes. It's a great feeling to impart knowledge and transcend mediocrity even if it is just stone and wood in the end. So I don't mind saying that how people perceive me is important and that I often make an effort to shape that perception even inside my home.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Love the honesty in this thread!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I love girlville's post :) THe last paragraph really summed up my views on "Wow" :)

My son is ill and sitting on my lap. He asked what this was about and when I told him "Wow" rooms he said, Mom my room is the biggest WOW, you should show them

OK so to me, wow is elusive in that we all disagree with the definition of wow :) To a six year old boy...this is wow:

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

rosey, your house sounds lovely. I used to dream about buying a school house that sits on a hill in the middle of a field that I think is near you? My great auntie lived in Coupeville for years and I went to school in Bham so we drove by that place constantly.

Which house were you thinking? We negotiated on the Consolate Inn for ever (nearly a year) but eventually bought the James house (which was not for sale) because she was being so difficult. We also planned on buying Starrett but the inspections were frightening! We were darned lucky the owner of the Inn wanted to retire :) She had told us no to an inquiry the year before.

We have permanently taken it off the Inn market though if you ever visit you'd see a sign in the window telling people that we are not an inn, nor do we allow tours. Having been the longest running B&B in the Pacific Northwest, we find that many previous guests won't give up trying to book rooms LOL I have so many funny stories of people coming up to ask...some even bring their luggage...just to be turned back by the evil new owners who are hoping to return the house to it's former glory :)

Lucky, photographing that silly cabinet is a challenge because I ripped down all of the horrible polyester lace curtains two years ago and still haven't replaced them (fabric purchased...and stored for when I have time). But with glare...here are a few far away and close ups. I would like to tell you the cabinet is always orderly, but the stacks in the closeups are more often there than not :( Such is life! Oh speaking of former glory...the walls in the background are puke pink...yes. I did not chose this color LOL That was the color I found (dates to about the 40's when the room was last painted) under the wallpaper. I haven't gotten around to redoing this room yet, but it will eventually be a shocking persimmon color with a gold ceiling.

Anyhoo, here's a few and one of my favorite piece, a russian caviar holder:
Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Demi...I am so sorry to share this obnoxious thought my dear...but your house has wow factor. I say that every time I see pics :p You've failed at your mission...or my version of "wow" is just a beautiful vignette I can't skip by too fast...

This post was edited by igloochic on Thu, Dec 13, 12 at 12:45


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

igloochic:

Wow!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

A house that is well designed, or tastefully decorated, or built with quality in mind is bound to have wow factor however inadvertent or secondary it is to good design, beauty, function or quality.

The issue with wow factor is not when it is combined with good elements of design, rather, the problem is wow factor substituting for elements of good design.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Love it or List it makes me crazy. They always miss some pricy underlying issue in the original owner's home, so they are short on their budget.

Instead of making say a modest second bath for the family of five, they put a steam shower and super high end finishes elsewhere, rip out Kitchens that could have been facelifted, etc.. However, I'm sure they have contracts with the steam shower manufacturers and the cabinet makers. However, instead of making more useable family space, they end up with a "wow" feature.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

igloochic: I have a stuffed animal loving six year old girl sitting with me now who thinks your little boy's room is total, complete, amazing WOW!!!

I was thinking of the blue house on the hill as you drive into town. I can't remember the name of it now. It was for sale for a while and I remember thinking how fun it would be to fix it up.

I am on a different island than the one you're thinking of. I live on on Bainbridge. My house is one of the early strawberry farms that the island was famous for a long time ago.

I know what you mean about people stopping by, although my house was never an inn. People stop all the time while they're out walking and tell me they used to babysit here years ago, or they built that planter in the front yard, or they used to play here when they were children. It's neat.

Actually, that is the wow factor that attracted me to the house in the first place. It has an amazing energy and a welcoming feel that has nothing to do with me or what I've done to it over the last ten years.

palimpsest: your last post completely, succinctly, and beautifully sums up my approach to design.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Rosy we are going to have to do lunch after the holidays! I'm looking for a kiddo doctor on bainbridge or poulsbo...I love wine...and old houses...we could even ditch our spouses and marry :p It's legal now heh heh

Bainbridge...well you're a fancy big city girl then :) Do you know where the Lindberg house is? My inlaws used to live across the street and I just adored that house to death. There is also a pocket of wonderful brick homes...early military...somewhere in the middle of the island I always look for but never find :)

The house on the hill is the Saunders house or the Holly Hill house if you are an old time resident like me (you count as old time if you remember the monkeys down town). The Saunders house (it's kind of blue green but the only one on the hill that was for sale) is owned by Mr. Kelly of the antique lighting store. Oh wait...there was the crack house on Morgan hill (up/uptown) which was well...a crack house, sold by the city. Both that house and the Saunders needed too much immediate work when we were shopping for a home. Our son was very ill at the time and we moved for his health so we needed a place that didn't need immediate work.

Instead we have long drawn out time consuming work :P You know the drill LOL

Lynxe :) See...the wow factor is a great distraction for the peeling paint, paper, cracks in the wall and general mess that the parlor is :) And thank you LOL


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Igloochic...I live down the street from the Lindberg house. Did you know it's for sale? It started out in the 8 millions and is now down in the 2's or 3's. I live a few doors down from the christmas tree farm.

Yes, I was thinking of the Saunders House. It did look like a MAJOR project.

Your in laws house:it isn't that charming blue old cottage is it?

To stay on topic, the Lindberg House has all the right kind of WOW factor :)


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I'm going to swoon...I always loved the Lindberg house...if we only lose a billion selling this one we might be able to afford it in....ok nevermind :p

I'm gonna look it up now though LOL

Their house was a white farm house style home...Its been so many years I'd have to drive down to figure it out. Across the street, just a bit down following the water if that makes sense. That's all I have in my memory. The Lowries lived in one house and the Hanson's in another...they married. This was many many years ago...maybe 50?

If I find the Lindberg listing I'll post a link to show fun wow :)


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

It appears a rather akward living room addition was made (I don't like the ceiling anyhoo and the big picture window is not period) but in general it's still a real wow house! The setting is also major wow, but even more fun, it's got wow history, which I love.

Our house was also a home for wayward girls (read girls who got pregnant out of wedlock) at one point. "Wayward" the victorians had such civilized terms for these things LOL

Here is a link that might be useful: Lindberg Mansion (and a few other folks lived there)


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Deleted my post... due to comment below by requests of graywings and sandyponder who are so much more worldly than I

This post was edited by mary_ruth on Fri, Dec 14, 12 at 10:19


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Cearbhaill---
Did you say you lived in KY? I have recently moved to KY from Texas, so my gardening is experiencing a learning curve!! And with dogs, too. Is it possible for us to get together and tour your garden?

Sorry to be so forward as to ask......

Thanks!
Nancy


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Actually, mary ruth, you are not being political, you are being hateful and homophobic. Take your intolerance and ignorance elsewhere.

sandyponder


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

And xenophobic.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Point taken... I didn't attack anyone personally here, Point taken I packed my bags... outta here, after all I stepped in YOUR territory???

IF you can't tolerate my comments, that says a lot about your Tolerance level for others! Don't need to read anymore on this thread nor your comments, I got the message, so I won't be back to respond.

message for graywings and Sandyponder who left the negative no-tolerance messages for me.

This post was edited by mary_ruth on Fri, Dec 14, 12 at 10:17


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Deleted my post... due to comment below by requests of graywings and Sandyponder who are so much more worldly than I am and have much more experience in life on the 'WILD' side than I do!

I disagreed with you, Mary Ruth, because I don't find the content of Sesame Street programming to be offensive.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Actually, I'm quite proud to be intolerant of hatred and bigotry, thank you.

sandyponder


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Igloo: that house had an open house recently but I missed it. I was sick! I have been stalking that house for years...Let's do lunch and then get the agent to give us a tour. I have GOT to see those pink pedestal sinks with original taps!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I don't consciously seek a "wow" element, because IMO when a house is well designed and furnished, functional, comfortable and lovely--- that is what creates the wow---- the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. A home should never take center stage; it should always be an understated, gracious background for those who live in it, a setting for the real life that is enriched by beautiful and comfortable surroundings.

I appreciate and love to visit beautiful homes, but the real "wow" for me in any home is the friendliness and hospitality of its family.


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

I have enjoyed reading this topic. It's been a long time since I've visited Garden Web. I'm doing good just to come up with a color scheme to get started on any hint of a "wow" factor for my great room.

More than a WOW factor, I wish my house had more character...like in architectural features, stone fireplaces instead of red brick, paneled pocket doors, larger baseboard trim, etc, etc.

Devonne


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

Downsouth, you can add character to your home! I have an old house but over the years, a lot of the original character was lost. Fireplaces sealed up, the remaining one had its mantel stolen along with the banister to the curved staircase, years of abandonment destroyed the wainscoting and hardwood floors in a few rooms, and there is no crown moulding anywhere. However, I plan to add it all back. By the time they wheel me out of here, people will swear it was that way all the time!

If it fits in with the period of your home, throw on some sweats, head to the local salvage store and bag up some character!


 o
RE: The elusive "Wow Factor"

The ever elusive wow factor~so do we want the wow factor to please ourselves or for others that see our home? Does a home absolutely need one, no. As was mentioned further above, if you walk into a home, and lets say the foyer looks like the Palace of Versailles, your expectations will be high re:the rest of the home. It it doesn't live up to such expectations, there's a major letdown. Model homes(usually!)are a perfect example of what I mean by expectations~every room is decorated, so there is no disappointment as you move thru the rooms. If you don't like the house, that's beside the point, but because it's a 'model' all spaces, including outdoor spaces, will be decorated.

I'm of the opinion you can have a well decorated home w/o having a wow factor~I see them frequently on this very forum. They're not decorated 'to the nines,' just decorated nicely, with attention to details that may be unique and stand apart from other homes that may be professionally decorated. I personally don't like a home to look contrived, as though a stage were set and beautiful items seemingly set sporadically here and there, if that's been determined to be the wow factor. You *can* have things arranged in a certain way so it doesn't come across as contrived. If you *think* it's looking staged, than it is.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Home Decorating & Design Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here