Return to the Cookware Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
What combo of bamix immersion blender, food proc and stand mixer?

Posted by Lynnalexandra (My Page) on
Thu, Dec 29, 05 at 21:28

I've been pouring over posts on various forums about food processors, immersion blenders and stand mixers. I still can't figure out what I need.

I just received a bamix deluxe immersion blender. I know that will take care of soups, and cut herbs, garlic etc. My old hamilton beach food processor just broke, so I'm borrowing my mothers moulinex la machine processor from the 80's. It has just 2 blades - shredder/grater disk and metal chopping blade. Maybe this is all I need.

Unless that la machine is very good, I'll probably buy another food processor. I want one that cuts/chops vegetables well (esp. onions without turning it into liquid). And general mixing. And maybe one that will allow my early tries with baking cakes or breads (so I can determine whether I would ever bake enough to warrant a stand mixer).

I'm thinking the KA 12-cup model (either 750 or 760) because I don't like the idea that with the cuisinarts you have to have the plunger in to operate - so no adding food into the chute while it's on. But here's my first question - what would I need that feature for - adding food slowly as it's mixing? Could I use it for baking, when dry ingredients need to be combined gradually.

So far I'm not a baker, but may occasionally want to bake a cake. Can I use a food processor for those times? I've never made bread, but have some idea that I'd like to give that a try. Are there food processors that are suitable for occasional small batches of bread (I am likely to use whole grains - not white flour).

My thinking is to get a food processor that will allow some minimal cake and bread baking. If it turns out I'm interested in baking more frequently, I'll look into a stand mixer (I'm thinking DeLonghi or the electrolux assistant - based on posts here).

All these are preliminary ideas (although I do own the bamix immersion blender). It's hard for me to sort out whether I can get by without a stand mixer. And I think I'm overlooking many considerations in what to look for in a food processor.

Anyone who can help me sort this out - or just point out anything else I should think about. My lack of clarity in considering these small appliances is reflected in my difficulty in articulating this post. HOpe this makes sense. Thanks.


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: What combo of bamix immersion blender, food proc and stand mi

Have you considered a hand mixer? They are inexpensive &, if you don't do a lot of baking, would work well for cakes but not breads.

A single loaf of bread could easily be kneaded by hand. A food processor is not the best for whole-grain mixing. Although, if you cut the whole-grain 50/50 with white flour in a single loaf recipe it might work. You could make a white flour, single-loaf recipe in a food processor being careful not to overheat the dough.

I'm not sure I understand what you're saying about the Cuisinart? You can add through the top while it's running so adding liquid for a pie crust or oil for mayo is not a problem.


 o
RE: What combo of bamix immersion blender, food proc and stand mi

Thanks Tricia. I do actually have an old sunbeam hand mixer. I used it once a couple of weeks ago for a muffin recipe that suggested a mixer - and the dry ingredients did go flying a bit (but I think that's my inexperience with technique). So I guess I can use that for cakes. Is a hand mixer preferable to a food processor - can a food processor be used for cakes? I'd like to contain my mess to inside a processor bowl, but don't think I've ever heard anyone mention using a processor for cakes.

Good point about being able to just hand-knead a single loaf. A single loaf should be fine while I'm just starting. Again, if I decide I'd like to make bread regularly, I'll look into a good stand mixer. I did not even realize that a problem with using a processor on bread dough was heating the dough itself. I thought the only problem was straining/overheat the processor motor.

About the cuisinart food processor - for some reason, I interpreted the customer reviews on Amazon to indicate that the 11 cup prep plus and 14 cup version both required the plunger in before it would operate. maybe I misunderstood that. I think the cooks illustrated reviews indicated some kind of problem people had with the chutes.


 o
RE: What combo of bamix immersion blender, food proc and stand mi

I wouldn't worry about the cakes. Maybe, you could make one in a processor. I've never done it but I don't lean towards using my Cuisinart for "floury" types of things. I have a stand-mixer for bread. I mix cakes by hand & have for 35 years. Don't know why...they're just quick & easy and it seems faster to just mix it than drag out the mixer, I guess.

I do think every kitchen should have a quality mixer of some sort though. Egg whites, for example, can actually be better done by hand in a copper bowl but it's a lot of work. A hand-mixer fits that bill fine. Stand-mixers are expensive pieces of equipment. It's similar to Le Crueset cookware........they're beautiful & do a great job with many types of cooking. But, they're expensive & you could accomplish the same thing with a $20 Lodge cast iron pot. So, while I own & enjoy LC...I wouldn't necessarily recommend it to a relatively new cook or inexperienced cook.

My recommendation to you would be to look at Kitchenaid hand-mixers. They are inexpensive (under $100, I think) and would handle most anything you are going to need for a while. I prefer Cuisinart but I think food processors all perform pretty much equally well...it's just a matter of personal choice.

As an experienced bread baker, and former teacher of bread-making...I'd strongly recommend you get your hands in the flour to start. That way, you'll learn how the dough "feels" going through it's various stages of development. A mixer does not understand how to make bread. It's just a workhorse, so to speak. What I'm saying is that a $500 mixer won't turn you into a bread baker. You'll still have to learn technique and the life-stages of yeast as well as how to manipulate time & temperature to create that perfect loaf of bread.

You have the boat motor which is a handy little gadget that you'll use frequently for making soups, sauces, etc. With the addition of a new hand-mixer you should be in pretty good shape for some time. And, maybe, your Sunbeam is working fine and you don't even need that.

Eventually, your experience in the kitchen will clarify for you what tools you need to improve your skills. And, again, remember our moms/grandmoms didn't have any of these fancy tools & they were excellent cooks.


 o
RE: What combo?

I wouldn't worry about the cakes. Maybe, you could make one in a processor. I've never done it but I don't lean towards using my Cuisinart for "floury" types of things. I have a stand-mixer for bread. I mix cakes by hand & have for 35 years. Don't know why...they're just quick & easy and it seems faster to just mix it than drag out the mixer, I guess.

I do think every kitchen should have a quality mixer of some sort though. Egg whites, for example, can actually be better done by hand in a copper bowl but it's a lot of work. A hand-mixer fits that bill fine. Stand-mixers are expensive pieces of equipment. It's similar to Le Crueset cookware........they're beautiful & do a great job with many types of cooking. But, they're expensive & you could accomplish the same thing with a $20 Lodge cast iron pot. So, while I own & enjoy LC...I wouldn't necessarily recommend it to a relatively new cook or inexperienced cook.

My recommendation to you would be to look at Kitchenaid hand-mixers. They are inexpensive (under $100, I think) and would handle most anything you are going to need for a while. I prefer Cuisinart but I think food processors all perform pretty much equally well...it's just a matter of personal choice.

As an experienced bread baker, and former teacher of bread-making...I'd strongly recommend you get your hands in the flour to start. That way, you'll learn how the dough "feels" going through it's various stages of development. A mixer does not understand how to make bread. It's just a workhorse, so to speak. What I'm saying is that a $500 mixer won't turn you into a bread baker. You'll still have to learn technique and the life-stages of yeast as well as how to manipulate time & temperature to create that perfect loaf of bread.

You have the boat motor which is a handy little gadget that you'll use frequently for making soups, sauces, etc. With the addition of a new hand-mixer you should be in pretty good shape for some time. And, maybe, your Sunbeam is working fine and you don't even need that.

Eventually, your experience in the kitchen will clarify for you what tools you need to improve your skills. And, again, remember our moms/grandmoms didn't have any of these fancy tools & they were excellent cooks.


 o
RE: What combo of bamix immersion blender, food proc and stand mi

Tricia - thank you again. (For some reason I didn't get sent your second post, and just saw it now). If cakes can be done well by hand, I'd prefer not to buy a large, expensive stand mixer for it. I'm not a cake person, and don't imagine that changing much, except for an occasional treat for my daughter or company - and even then I prefer pie and cookies.

It make sense that there's still a lot I'd need to learn about bread making. I hadn't realized that before. So when I get around to trying bread, I'll do it by hand first.

I also think it's a great idea consider a good quality hand mixer (if my sunbeam isn't good). You're right that experience will help guide what tools I need, but I had to start somewhere until I got that knowledge. I think you've given me just the information I needed. Thanks.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Cookware Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here