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Apronwear

Posted by ktee (My Page) on
Wed, Nov 29, 06 at 8:43

Am I the only person in the world that can't seem to find an ideal apron? I want one that not only protects the clothes underneath, but also one that absorbs the drippings of frequently washed hands. I hate it when I run my hands down the length of my apron and find it nearly repels the moisture, feeling scratchy and rough. I've thought about a terry cloth one; it might absorb the moisture without soaking in the splashes but I don't want one that is heavy. Maybe no such speciment exist, but if it does, I'm sure someone here will know about it.

Thanks...


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Apronwear

I bought an apron at Tuesday Morning and it is made out of a fabric similar to a dish towel. I think those smooth, tight weaves are great at protecting clothing, but like you point out, don't absorb water. The label inside my apron says "Kay Dee Designs" 177 Skunk Hill Road, Hope Valley, RI 02832. It's 100% cotton, green and white checked design with roosters in some of the squares. It cost $7.99.


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RE: Apronwear

Might be you're looking to meet contradictory needs, Ktee.

Aprons are designed to protect the underlying clothing (and, sometimes, skin) from splashes, drips, etc. Most of the time they have a hard finish, and are not particularly absorbent.

For absorbency you need a towel. Most chefs I know have a separate towel draped over their shoulder all the time. That's what they use for drying washed hands, catching major spills, and other situations where absorbancy is the prime goal. As a side-benefit, the towel can often be used in place of pot holders.

Wiping cloths are something else again. Let's say you need to wipe your knife between uses that do not require washing; or brush off your cutting board. Uses like that. Enter the wiping cloth. I actually find diapers the best material for this use, as they are absorbant enough to do the job, but hard enough so as to not destroy the edge on a knife, the way terrycloth can.


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RE: Apronwear

Perhaps if you tie your apron around the front, you can "hang" a towel from the sashes at your waist.


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RE: Apronwear

Good thought, Cup. That should work pretty good for just about anyone who uses an apron.


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RE: Apronwear

Thanks, Garden and Cup. A towel does sound like a good idea, one thrown over the shoulder. Or maybe one draped over the ties. I really appreciate your input.


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RE: Apronwear

My favorite apron is made by Calphlon. It's big, heavy and has very sturdy pockets. You could wipe your hands on it without worring about your clothes underneath.


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RE: Apronwear

Ever go out in public with a towel over your shoulder? I have....felt a bit silly when I realized it!
Linda C


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RE: Apronwear

More than once, Linda.

But I've done things a lot sillier, so it doesn't bother me all that much. :>)


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RE: Apronwear

My apron from ikea has 3 loops across the front. I assume they are to hang a towel from - at least that's what I use them for! I also like it because the cord that forms the ties runs up through the edge of the apron and around your neck, so you can make that loop as long or short as needed.


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RE: Apronwear

I just bought a big green chef's apron, and the ties are long enough to come back around front. I've been looking for one for awhile, so I can tuck a kitchen towel under the ties. I use it for wiping my hands. Means I don't have to wash the apron as often as I wash the towels.

My other, decorative aprons, didn't work well. I always ended up running a towel through the belt loop in my jeans.

I may have to start making them to get just what I want.


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RE: Apronwear

Actually, my favorite "apron" is a surgical scrub gown. It goes to the neck, ties in front and totally covers my clothes.


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RE: Apronwear

I don't know how you guys balance a towel on your shoulder. I saw Emeril doing it, so I tried to and my towel keeps falling off! LOL

I gave up trying to find a nice apron and just have a towel handy when I'm cooking. =)


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RE: Apronwear

I just toss it up there, and there it stays.

Of course, now that you've got me thinking about it...... :>)


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RE: Apronwear

Now about the towel over the shoulder: it seems that folks with broader shoulders would have an advantage, unless more petite people use those sorts of towels that are meant for guests in the bathroom. But I like the idea of a towel somewhere on the apron, because you can wipe anything on it (thus not using it just for drying newly cleaned things like hands or utensils) and toss it in the laundry after the meal is prepared rather than soiling perhaps a nicer set of rather clean dish towels (that you bought to go with the rest of the kitchen) at every meal.


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RE: Apronwear

Shoulder pads!!!...Seriously! I am narrow shouldered and have a bit of balancing to do so keep the bottom half in synch...so I almost always put a skinny little velcro shouldre pad into my shirt/blouse. Keeps that towel....and my purse where I put it.
Linda C


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RE: Apronwear

Towel doesn't work for me either. I have very sloped shoulders so NOTHING stays up there very long.

Anyone ever heard of a Hoover apron? My grandmother had one. It buttoned in the front over to one side and after cooking and the front of the apron was dirty you could unbutton that side and reverse it over to button on the other side and you had a clean apron front. I'd know one if I saw it, but I have never found one.


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RE: Apronwear

Hoover aprons were something you made....or someone made for you....and also served as maternity tops.
Never seen one "ready made" for sale.
Linda C


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RE: Apronwear

Thanks Linda. I'm sure my grandmother made hers, too, but you would think that a pattern at least would've survived. They're such a GOOD idea. I keep checking eBay thinking that maybe a used one will surface, but I have yet to see one.

Maybe that's the problem--they were all USED up....:) Wish I had my grandmother's to at least get a pattern from it. I would make one for myself.


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RE: Apronwear

I wear a short waist style apron and tuck my kitchen towel into it. I am right-handed and find it convenient to have a readily accessible towel on my left side. I tried the over the shoulder thing and sooner or later the towel ended up on the counter.


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