Return to the Cookware Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
What kind of rolling pin do you have?

Posted by maggie5IL (My Page) on
Mon, Oct 31, 05 at 8:28

Is there a difference between the old fashioned kind with swilvely handles vs the small tapered ones, you think?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I have a large French rolling pin (tapered ends) and a marble one with handles. Anything larger than the length of the marble one, and I use the French one. It does not leave grooves like the marble one does. I think I would keep the French one if I had to get rid of one.


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

Mine is roughly a 24" long, 2" thick dowel. It isn't tapered at all, just a solid piece of wood. I don't remember what kind of wood it is I just oil it periodically & scrape off any dough that occasionally gets stuck to it. This is my rolling pin for everything & I love it. Found it at William's Sonoma about 8 years ago.

My mother's rolling pin is the standard by which I judge. Maybe 60 years old, slightly thicker than mine and about 36" long. I think that it's maple. So well tended & well used that it's practically non stick.

Nina


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I've got the French type - tapered ends - and it does a great job. The old-fashioned ones with handles that swivel look great, but sooner or later the handles are going to get loose and come off, maybe. I wash my French-style immediately after use and dry it well. Don't ever let good wood utensils sit and soak in the dishwater.


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I have the kind with the swivel handles....been using it for more than 45 years....handles still on....and I also have my mother's rolling pin with the swivel handels....lots older than 40 some years.....and the handles are still fine on that one....although she didn't use it much in the past 20 some years....
Never wash my rolling pin....just scrape or rub it with some mylon scrubber.
Linda C


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

Maybe they don't make them like they used to or something...My mom has the same roller she used when I was growing up. Handles still intact. My grandmother too. I just don't like how narrow they are. When I roll out cookies, I roll out a lot at once and I am too heavy-handed to not end up with "tracks" from the edge of the roller. :)


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

Sunnyco,

That's the beauty of a rolling pin like my mom's- no tracks in the dough. I've also never found that rolling pin to be unweildy in spite of it's length.

Hmmm...I don't think that I've ever used a rolling pin with handles, with the exception of the 8" long wooden children's rolling pin that I was given when I first started "helping" my mom with the baking.

Nina


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I have my mother's hollow glass rolling pin. You can put ice water inside it to keep your dough cold.


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

Nina,

Your pin sounds like the one I use for rolling out slabs of clay for ceramics, except that I use a wood slat on each side to keep me from mooshing down harder on one side than the other. It is a piece of closet pole (dowel) 3 ft long I bought at the hardware store for just this purpose. :)


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I have a French rolling pin (tapered ends) and really love it. I find it easier to maneuver than a traditional handled rolling pin. I also wash and dry it immediately after use, using water only. I purchased mine for under $5.00 at TJ Maxx, after looking for quite a while for a "bargain" price.
N


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I have had the same one for over 25 years. French Tapered. I use it for everything from pie pastry to pizza or pasta dough. The only one I own now.

Ann


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

Sunnyco,

I'll just bet that's what my mom's rolling pin started out life as! My father made it for her, I'm sure that it was originally a dowel. That's basically what mine is too although it came from Wm Sonoma & was more costly than a closet pole (I'm sure). The edges of the ends are rounded a bit.

Demicent, those hollow glass rolling pins are the coolest. I see them at glass shows all of the time but always wondered about their fragility. I guess they'd have to be pretty durable for them to still be around & in use.

Nina


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I have an absolutely BEAUTIFUL one made out of lathe turned black walnut.

When the ex and I were on our honeymoon in the Great Smokies, we stopped in at a small woodworking shop outside, IIRC, Sevierville.

They did some really nice work, and I was admiring the rolling pins (no swivly handles).

When we got back into the car, my wife presented me with one of the most gorgeous pieces of burl walnut I've ever seen.

Unfortunately, that was the highlight of our married life. :-0


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I bought myself three good roling pins. The big one I bought at a restaurant supply store, and I like its heft and turning handles. The tapered French one I bought as my souvenir in Paris. And somewhere I bought a thick almost round rolling pin a little larger than a closet rod. They are all good.


 o
RE: What kind of rolling pin do you have?

I have a wood one with the handles (that always come off the dowel when I use it) and a marble one that I like for use on my whole grain bread dough. I grind my own grain and it tends to make a stickeir dough than store bought flour, so it doesn't stick to the marble as bad, especially if I chill it, which I usually don't bother to do.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Cookware Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here