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Best cookware for induction?

Posted by dccnm (My Page) on
Wed, Jun 23, 04 at 14:27

After LIVING on the kitchen site for the last few months, I've decided to go with an induction cooktop (AEG). Now I'll need to buy new pots/pans. I currently use my 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, and 5 quart pots the most. I have a nonstick frying pan for eggs, and a very large calphalon that I love but honestly only use for a few dishes. The other loved, but not often used pot is 12 quarts (great for large portions of pasta and potatoes). I'd miss that.

So, without taking out a second mortgage, what pots/pans would be the best for me? My research suggests that the Demeyere Apollo might fit the bill but I decided to ask the people who aare using them, not selling them!

TIA


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Demeyere and All Clad stainless are both made for induction. There are a few other brands out there but these should be a good place to start. Go to someone like Bloomies and Macys when they are having a sale on their kitchen ware. This make things a little cheaper for the All Clad. Demeyere has rarely been on sale anywhere I have looked.

Good luck!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I ordered some Demeyere Apollo saucepans last month and am very happy with them, but they are the first decent pans I've owned so I don't consider myself much of an expert!

The Silvinox finish is quite nice, however the pans have a disc on the base that doesn't stay as nice-looking as the rest of the pan. Also, I bought a 1.1-quart saucepan and just discovered a couple of nights ago that it is too small to be used on my induction cooktop -- I guess there has to be a certain amount of steel present, and some of the smaller pans don't have enough. Hopefully there is information about this in your owner's manual; I would strongly recommend reading it before buying any small pans.

Good luck!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I have a huge range of cookware that I use on my induction cooktop, from vintage enameled steel to demyere. As long as a magnet sticks, they all do great for different things. Having a flat bottom does make some difference but not much.

Sunny


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I have a couple of the table top (not built in) units, and I find that cast iron works great on an induction cooktop, and it is not very expensive either. However, there are a few tricks to using cast iron, and if you don't know how you won't be happy with it.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Sitram Profiserie is fine cookware - induction capable and far less expensive than Demeyere. Costco currently has an 11-piece set on its website for 149.99. I recently found a 3 qt Sitram Profiserie saute pan and lid in the home goods store affiliated with TJ Maxx (forget the name) for 19.99.

Sitram isn't well known in this country. It's made in France. Cybernox was its big-deal invention a few years ago (about which folks have varying opinions - but it is also induction capable, if you have any).

Calphalon or Cuisinart stainless steel is not, at least in my experience, induction capable. I have some of both and they are a no-go on my countertop induction unit.

I use all-clad, le creuset, sitram, mauviel inducinox and demeyere - various pots and pans - if a magnet will stick to the *bottom* of the pan (sides don't count if the bottom isn't magnetic) it's good to go.

Both induction units I've had signaled with beeps if you put a pan on them that wasn't induction capable.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I use mostly All-Clad stainless, which is mostly induction capable, but a few pieces are not. I have the list, if you are interested. I also use cast iron, which may be the best on induction.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

One of my favorite pots is a Bourgeat stockpot. I don't have an induction hob, so I don't know how well it cooks on induction, but it sez in the literature that it is designed for both regular and induction use--and seeing as how it's from France (just like the Coneheads) where induction is more common, I would assume they would be designing it to perform well for that market.

Bourgeat makes a few different lines, some of copper (obviously not good for induction) and stainless (some items of which are good for induction).

This particular pot is a 26 liter stainless stockpot with a spigot on the bottom. On gas it is exquisitely responsive, like driving a sports car. I make stock in it, letting it simmer for hours, then drain off the stock into canning jars and can them in a pressure canner.

I bought it from My Chef's Favourites, and I had a good experience with them. Recommended. Bourgeat is available from other online merchants as well.

Here is a link that might be useful: My Chefs Favourites


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

So, is it absolute that if a magnet doesn't stick, it won't work? I'm looking at induction, but, sigh, my William Sonoma All Clad is copper core, and doesn't stick. It sounds like from everything I've heard, it might be worth giving it up.....?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Yes, it's an absolute. I had to replace all of my cookware except for a few cast iron frying pans. But I've never looked back--I love my induction cooktop!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Silly question

What's an induction top???

And how is that different from any other stove?? I don't think I ever seen one of this????


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Induction is a cooktop that heats just the pan and not the area around the pan. It operates on magnet force which creates heat. It can be much hotter than the average gas pro stove. Cleaner, I think, and safer as the top (smooth) doesn't get very hot.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I've been researching this question, and it looks to me like the way to go is Demeyere Atlantis. Or, for less money, their Apollo line is pretty nice, too.

I've attached a link to their website--it pretty much explains it all. (In addition to Atlantis, "Home" will get you to the top which will get you to Apollo.)

I've seen it at a local store, and, besides being functional, it's quite nice looking.

Here is a link that might be useful: Demeyere Atlantis.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

If money is a concern, QVC's stainless lines are induction compatible and are very well made pans. We have a set+ and after two and a half years we have no complaints. They have a metal-utensil safe nonstick coating and a tri-ply base that distributes heat evenly and quickly. They are dishwasher safe and can go in the oven to 350 or 500 dependng on the line. They also have a lifetime guarantee and you can return them after 30 days for a full refund if you don't like them. You can get a decent starter set for about $125 or so, I believe. Check it out. Good cookin' :-)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I was reading the user manual for an induction cooktop that we are considering and it said that certain pans have a more pronounced "humming sound" than others when used. The manufacturer stated that it is not a problem of the induction cooktop but of the pan itself.

I realize that any pan will *work* if a magnet sticks to it, but if I go to TJ Maxx with my magnet, will I end up with noisy cookware? I'm serious! That would drive me nuts!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Good question--and I don't know the answer. I have both expensive (Viking) and inexpensive (Jamie Oliver from TJ's) and I think they both hum! It isn't loud and certainly doesn't bother me. You mostly notice it when you first turn the stove on. Once the food is cooking, I, at least, don't notice it.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

dccnm-- a little off topic, but how do you like your AEG cooktop? We are looking at the 88100mn (or something like that) from a Canadian source. Are you happy with your AEG?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I LOVE it! I ended up with induction because I needed a shallow cooktop to fit into the space I had without losing my drawers beneath. (I didn't replace my cabinets.) I learned about them here on the forum and decided to go for it. I am SO happy I did! It is so responsive it amazes me. For instance, if a pot is about to boil over and you lower the heat, it instantly stops. I can melt chocolate without a double burner--perfectly. The power option on two of the burners boils water so quickly that it feels like I'm not waiting at all. I can't say enough good things about it.

I purchased it from Canada and the transaction was smooth. It was delivered to a warehouse near me and I saved $50 by picking it up there instead of getting it delivered to my door. It was simple to hook up and I was instantly in love. The only "downside" is that it is solid black and does show everything but it's easy to keep clean with a miracle cloth and occassional cooktop cleaner. A small price to pay.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I just came back from TJ Maxx. Boy, did I get some strange looks from people as I slapped my magnet on the bottom of each pan! I found 2 non-stick pans from an Italian maker that clung to my magnet. Everything I saw appeared to be 18/10 stainless.

Alanrockwood- do share your cast iron cooking tips!

dccnm- I know what you mean about the black top. You"re right: it"s a small price to pay considering that spills don"t bake on the surface anymore


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

URSpider,

A few tips about cast iron. You might already know some or all of them, but here goes. First and most important, the pan has to be seasoned before use. This basically means heating the pan with a thin coating of cooking oil until it turns dark and quits smoking. Usually, several treatments are required to get a good seasoning layer. I do it in my propane BBQ to keep from filling up the house with smoke. The seasoning will get better as you use the pan, provided you take care of the pan correctly. After a while it gets to be a non-stick surface, almost like teflon.

Second, don't wash the pan with soap and water because that will ruin the seasoning. Often you can just wipe out the pan with a towel or paper towel and put it away. Sometimes you might have to use warm/hot water and a mild (not aggressive) plastic scratch pad. If you do have to resort to soap and water you will probably end up needing to reseason the pan.

Third, when you cook something in the pan it is best to heat the pan first. Otherwise the food is more likely to stick. For a typical example, to make skillet cornbread you would preheat the pan, either on the stove top or while you preheat the oven. Put a little oil in the pan. (You can put the oil in first, but if you do it will smoke a lot when you preheat the pan.) Then pour the batter in the hot skillet and return to the oven to bake. This technique makes a superior crust.

Fourth, never put really cold water into a really hot pan. Perhaps I should say don't put a lot of really cold water in a really hot pan. A small amount won't hurt. The problem you are trying to avoid here is cracking the pan from thermal shock.

Fifth, don't soak the pan for long periods before washing, and be sure to wipe the pan thoroughly dry. It works best if the pan is warm when you dry the pan so any water residue will evaporate. Some people even heat the pan briefly on the stove. The idea here is to avoid rust.

Sixth, store the pan with a thin coating of oil on the surface. This prevents rust. Cooking oil works if you use the pan regularly, but it tends to go rancid rather fast. Shortening is said to work well... doesn't go rancid. There is a product from a company called Camp Chief that is supposed be work well and doesn't go rancid. I usually use a very thin coating of food grade mineral oil.

Do some googling on cast iron cookware and/or dutch oven cookery to find more information on the care and use of cast iron cookware.

If you take care of it cast iron will reward you. It heats evenly, it holds heat a long time, and a well seasoned pan has a non-stick surface that will rival teflon, and unlike teflon the surface can be renewed if it gets damaged. Take care of it and your great grandchildren will be using the your pans long after you are gone. Besides, for some reason food tastes better when cooked in cast iron.

Did I mention that cast iron is relatively inexpensive? You can get a plain cast iron indoor-style dutch oven (Lodge brand) for a fraction of the cost of porcelain covered cast iron (Le Creuset), and the plain cast iron is more non-stick, and less likely to be damaged by mistreatment. If the surface does become damaged you can always renew it, as mentioned earlier, whereas with the porcelain covered cast iron if you chip the surface it can never be fixed. In comparison to teflon covered cookware, cast iron will last forever if treated well, whereas with teflon you will buy new pans every few years or so.

A couple of more things, the first few times you use your newly seasoned cast iron cook some nice greasy things. It helps develop the seasoning. Avoid acid foods, like tomato sauce or things with a lot of vinegar until you have used the pan a lot to develop the seasoning.

Alton Brown, host of the TV show Good Eats, is a proponent of cast iron cookware, as befitting his southern roots.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Alanrockwood- great tips! Thanks for posting them. Now I understand why I didn't have success with my old iron pan. I did season it but was definitely guilty of letting it soak in hot soapy water one too many times. I'll try again!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I don't ever use a scrubber on my cast iron pans if something is sticking to them. I use kosher salt in a dry pan to scrub the "bits" off and then clean out the salt and rinse, then oil.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Hamptonmeadow, thanks for the tip about the kosher salt.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Someone made the comment that cast iron was "maybe the best" thing to use with induction cooktops. Can someone who has a 1.2Kw portable comment on using cast iron with it? Do they just take a bit longer to heat up? I'm wondering whether I can heat up a grill pan hot enough to sear a steak, or whether big dutch ovens are useable on a 1.2Kw induction element...


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Much to my surprise, when I did the magnet test this weekend on Costco's Kirkland beautiful 5 ply set (with copper sandwich bottoms) it worked! The bottom stainless layer must be 18/0 even though they don't mention anything about this.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

so phatcat how do you like the 5 ply set after using it? Unfortunately we do not have a costco nearby I miss costco,having a hard time typing a lapdog sleeping under my laptop


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I recently upgraded to an induction stovetop and found that my "old" Kirkland tri-ply pot set didn't work. Based on the comment above, I took a magnet down to Costco and confirmed that the "new" 5-ply set is indeed magnetic on the bottom. I purchased the set and they seem to work just fine on my stovetop. They are pretty to look at, though I never favored the bulbous shape, I like how it keeps stuff in the pots better when stirring and it pours very nicely.

I can't imaging why they specifically state on the box that the set works with all other stove-types, but leave out induction from the list. I also wonder why in all my research, I've seen almost not mention of whether certain induction-capable pans work better than othre induction-capable pans due to the unique mix of metals in the various magnetic stainless steel layers or even the thickness of the layers (for example, Allclad's outer layer seems rather thin compared to bonded plate pots such as Sitram or Demeyere).

C


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portables and cast iron

I have had a Sunpentown portable (1200w)and used a le Creuset cast iron French Oven on it quite successfully. As far as I can remember, the limiting factor for the smaller wattage portables is the maximum allowed capacity of the pan (8 qts or less, I think).

I now have an 1800w Iwatani portable, works fine with cast iron. I haven't checked the max. capacity for that burner, but it's immaterial since my largest cast iron French Oven is 5 quarts, small enough to meet the lower powered Sunpentown's restrictions.

I haven't tried searing a steak with the induction burner, I'm afraid that not doing it under the range hood might set off a smoke alarm :) or spread the greasy splatter to places I don't want to get splattered (save it for the cooktop!).


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Hi Cike, thank you for telling us aout the Costco 5 ply cookware. Is it dishwash safe?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I love my induction cooktop, well worth getting new pots/pans.

Was able to find all the pans I needed at TJMax. Took about 3 trips but they brought in new stuff off and on. The magnet had a strong pull on bottom of pans. I bought about 3 or 4 different brands, all looked similar and work great.

I spend only a fraction of what AllClad would have cost.


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RE: Best cookware for induction--can you 'cheat' it?

I have a Chemex glass kettle which I adore--works wonderfully on gas and looks sleek. Is there any way to "cheat" an induction cooktop with a cast iron disk or other device so that a non-induction capable piece of cook ware can be used? Chemex also works on electric using the suppled small "grill" to slightly raise the glass bottom from direct contact with the electric grate. I am sure this would be necessary on a cheated induction top, if cheating is possible.

This Chemex is my only regret with getting induction. Hope there is a way to keep it and maintain my cooktop!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Love our KitchenAid Gourmet Distinctions. 5-ply, glass lid beauties, that are easy to take care of (with the discovery of BKF). Bought at Macy's on sale with the coupon: 10 piece set - $130.

Here is a link that might be useful: KitchenAid Gourmet Distinctions


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Any way to "cheat" induction?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

For anyone who wishes to "cheat" induction cooking, you can purchase an induction disk. It is for using non-induction cookware on induction cooktops. I found it on Amazon.com for $89.95. It is made by Mauviel.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I recently made the switch from gas to induction and had to replace my cookware. I did hours and hours and HOURS of research and visited, magnet in hand, many stores - from WalMart to Williams-Sonoma, Bed Bath and Beyond, Target, etc ad infinitum. I also visited two large kitchen supply houses. Here are my conclusions:

Only a fool or the status obsessed would waste money on All-Clad. You might as well burn lots of $20 bills.
The best value in stainless is Emerilware, made by All-Clad, and available many places.
Best value in enamel coated cast iron - fabulous Dutch ovens - is Martha Stewart at Macys and Lodge. These are LeCrueset quality at half the price. The Martha Stewart stainless looked quite nice but I dont know if it is induction suitable.
Best value in all-purpose/non stick is Circulon Infinite. This is truly wonderful, very high quality, stuff. It is available both open stock and in sets. Careful: Circulon makes several lines, but only the Infinite is induction compatible.The 10 pc set retails at $299 - I bought mine from Macys who was offering two extra bonus pieces - a very nice 4 qt sauce pan and a kind of Paella pan. I notices that latter was not the Infinite line, and they instantly substituted a 12" saute pan that retailed for $129. Best of all, I asked for and got a 20% discount and so got the 10 pc set plus the two bonus pieces for $240!! Also- the 10 pc set comes with three lids but they fit, perfectly, all of the pans in the set.
Tramontina makes two lines that are induction - the cheaper one is pretty flimsy, but ethe more expensive one - called "Professional", is All-Clad solid, and very reasonable. WalMart carries these open stock. Their 12 qt stockpot - $40 - is a great buy.
Dont get anything with a coper bottom - they leave a messy residue on the cooktop.

ALWAYS take a magnet to make sure the pans really are magnetic.


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Cast Iron

A note on cast iron cookware.

First, I love cast iron- it is hands down the best - heats evenly, heats very efficiently, and is just fabulous for browning and for braising. The only downside is its weight.

Second, Lodge Cast iron is the best value in cookware, period. Properly seasoned and maintained it is absolutely non-stick. HOWEVER, seasoning and maintaining is a bit of a chore, and I find that sometimes the Lodge dutch oven gives off a metallic taste - maybe that is from acidic foods; I dont know. This is never a problem with my Lodge 12" fry pan which I use extensively for browning and other things. Anyway, after getting a terrific buy on a LeCrueset dutch oven at Costco and using it extensively I recommend spending more and going for the enamel covered dutch ovens. Martha Stewart and Lodge have both and the are reasonable.

For the best ever steaks or veal chops try the following in a Lodge cast iron pan:

Pre-heat oven to 450

Bone-in strip or porterhouse, or rib veal chops, 2" thick. Dry thoroughly and coat well with salt and pepper

Heat the Lodge on high heat until smoking

Sear the meat 3 minutes each side - till brown and crusty

Finish in the oven 20 minutes for med rare [15 mins for meat 1.5" thick

Only a cast iron pan can take this!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

srsm, you really should understand what you are talking about before you post. I own a complete set of Demeyere cookware because it is FAR superior to anything you mention. The only thing that even comes close IS THE ALL-CLAD!

It has nothing to do with "status" or being foolish. On the contrary, it has to do with loving to cook, getting the proper use out of the technology, and spending wisely.

Foolish is buying an expensive induction cooktop and using cheap cookware. This would be like buying a BMW or Mercedes and putting twenty dollar tires on it and using low octane fuel then wondering why is rides horribly.

I can understand if you do not have the money for high quality cookware or are overly concerned with its price, you might be inclined to look the other way, but to come out and call people fools or 'status obsessed' is flat out ridiculous and you should be embarrassed.

Higher quality cookware heats more evenly, quicker and holds the temperature inside the cooking vessel better, thereby wasting less energy. They also have many other quality characteristics over lower-end cookware.

For instance, depending on the piece (skillets, saut pans, etc), higher quality cookware will have multilayer material right up to its edge for proper heating. You wont get this with the cheaper mass produced sets that srsm recommends. "Hours" of research does not leave you walking around a department store with a MAGNET!

Additionally, you need to consider what and how you cook. Do you need a set that can go from the cooktop right to the oven? Do you need specialty pieces? Are you concerned with the power of the induction cooktop and want some pieces which will not go above 250 degrees? Do you want good pouring edges, quality lids and a sturdy construction?

How about storage? Will your cookware be hung in the open and therefore be in need of a beautiful finish which, with normal usuage, will not tarnish, corrode, chip or fade? I've had mine two years, use them almost every day and they look as they did when they came out of their boxes.

You want a 30 year guarantee? You'll go through multiple sets of cheaper cookware over the life one piece of Demeyere or All-Clad.

Once you cook with the high end stuff, you'll have a difficult time using anything else. This is coming from experience.

You will see, feel and maybe even taste the difference.

Lets face it, if you had to, you can cook a chicken skewered on a tree branch over a fire fueled by the same tree. Of course, your cooking experience may not be that great nor the taste of the food...


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Some personal experience with cast iron and Demeyere. Induction cooktop is a Fagor IFA-80 AL and usage is with the 2800 watt burner.

I used the Alton Brown technique of seasoning a Lodge pan. (Bacon fat in an oven for two hours. Tilt the pan so that excess runs off.) The seasoning didn't result in a non-stick surface. I cooked 1" thick filet mignons (salt/pepper/peanut oil on steaks only) at maximum heat for three minutes to a side in the pan and finished off in the oven. There was a lot of smoke (bacon fat? peanut oil?) and I had the hood at max. They were medium well and well done. It may be legit to claim that the poor seasoning was the culprit for smoke generation - in which case I think that seasoning a cast iron pan isn't that foolproof. On the objective side the pan is heavy and the handle gets hot.

I had also cooked bacon & eggs post-seasoning and before the filet mignons. The eggs never came out easily and the pan surface never became smooth.

Did the same thing with a Demeyere saute pan but only for two minutes to a side. Not quite as well done and there was about the same amount of smoke. I made the dumb mistake of keeping the setting at max temperature (12) for the entire four minutes. Per their guide I should have lowered the setting to 6 (?) when I put the steaks in after the pan was hot. There was plenty of burnt "junk" around the steaks. It took a lot of elbow grease and Barkeepers Friend (cookware powder) in multiple sessions to get it out. The saute pan is not as heavy as cast iron but it's certainly not light.

Now you know that I'm not great at cooktop steaks. At least not yet. Also, 2800 watts can put out a lot of heat. (As for whether cast iron is best or whether buying Demeyere is like throwing away money - I'm not offering an opinion. I'm generally satisfied with Demeyere and to each his own.)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

You might want to check out a Tuesday Morning if you have one nearby. They may still have a few pieces of Meyer cookware. They carried both induction and non-induction so be sure to look for the thicker bottom that says "induction capable" on it. These are really nice restaurant grade pots and pans, some have the silicone overlay on the handle. They are very "industrial" looking, which I like. Pots/pans ran about $25-$50 each and I've been very impressed with how well they work.

I also found some LeCreuset-like enameled cast iron cookware at TJ Maxx recently that was very nice. If it holds up as well remains to be seen. I found some brand new knockoff French enameled cast iron about ten years ago in a Goodwill, of all places, and put it in my guest house, and it's held up very well. I think I might "borrow back" some of those pieces now that I have an induction top being installed.

I agree with klaa2, there's nothing that beats really good quality cookware. If you really know about cooking, you can tell the difference and you don't like to compromise. I would have AllClad in a second if I could afford itit lasts a lifetimeand I'll likely get some pieces in the future. In the meantime I think the cast iron and enameled cast iron provides a good alternative at an attractive price for those of us who don't want to make a big investment all at once.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Macy's has a tools of the trade in house brand called belgique. i paid $150 for a 14 piece set and they work great. i'm not a believer in paying up for pots/pans. they have a rubber insert under the handle for ease of use which i was worried about it melting. i also found a non stick wok that works for induction under the same brand name on sale for $15.

to be sure ask the sales person to borrow the magnet that holds their name tag on. any pot that a magnet sticks to will work on the induction.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Has anyone had any experience with Bourgeat's Excellence line of stainless induction capable cookware? If so what are your opinions about it?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I have not been able to find induction ready cookware that is reasonably priced, has large open stock selection (or a decent set), and has glass lids? From my travels on the web I found, Demeyere Apollo, Mauviel M'Cook, AC (but everyone says the handles are uncomfortable and it's $$$), Heckels Classic Clad, Sitram, Viking Pro Series, Le Crueset (though pretty, is just too heavy), and Lodge Enamel Cast Iron (also heavy).

I've been looking for the website to state "induction ready" or "induction capable".

Have I missed some that just don't state this?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Demeyere has Pyrex lids that will fit most or all of their cookware. Also, at least the Atlantis and Apollo lines are available without the SS lids, allowing you to buy Pyrex lids instead.

I have linked to Knife Merchant's Demeyere page. The Pyrex lids are in the "Lids" section, about 3/4's the way down the page. They are labeled "Apollo", but will work fine with any of Demeyere's cookware.

Here is a link that might be useful: Demeyere at Knife Merchant


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Be sure to check TJ Maxx

I was at TJ Maxx earlier today and found two great pieces of All Clad, a really nice saute pan and a wok pan, both with lids. They had a choice of three different saute pans, one for 99 dollars, one for 129 and one for 199. The 199 one had a copper stripe around it and bought that one, it's gorgeous. The Wok pan was 99.

There were several other brands of cookware that were induction capable (I brought my magnet!) and were quite reasonable and seemed well-made.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

FYI, the All Clad with the "copper stripe around it" is probably their Copper Core line, which All Clad says is not induction compatible.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

"FYI, the All Clad with the "copper stripe around it" is probably their Copper Core line, which All Clad says is not induction compatible."

I guess my induction cooktop didn't get the memo, because it worked great last night! ;-)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

"I guess my induction cooktop didn't get the memo, because it worked great last night! ;-)"

Interesting...

I had been quite interested in a Copper Core frying pan, and crossed it off my list because I saw that it isn't induction-capable. I am no longer able to find that reference. Perusing the All Clad web site, I note a few things:

1. They don't say whether or not the CC line is induction capable.

2. They do say that the SS line is induction capable.

3. They state that the outer layer of the SS line is magnetic stainless steel.

4. They state that the outer layer of the CC line is 18/10 stainless, which is normally a non-magnetic alloy.

Obviously, the pan you bought is working on induction. I think I would be careful about generalizing that all of the CC line works on induction until that is proven, because AC isn't representing that that line works on induction. On the other hand, it just might work.

'Tis a bit of a puzzle. :)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

" I think I would be careful about generalizing that all of the CC line works on induction until that is proven, because AC isn't representing that that line works on induction."

I didn't generalize. All I said is that I bought an AllClad saute pan with a copper stripe around it, and that it works on my cooktop. I made no claims about any lines and what they could or could not do.

All anyone needs to do is bring a magnet with them shopping. Nothing more.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Sorry--I didn't intend to imply that you were generalizing. I was suggesting that others might not want to generalize from your experience, because All Clad isn't representing the Copper Core line as being induction capable (at least as far as I can find on their web site).

I think it is cool that you found a deal on a great pan that is working for you!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Though I don't have an induction cooktop, I just purchased a large stainless non-stick skillet last weekend at BB&B. It is a Farberware Millenium and the label said induction ready. I just checked it with a magnet and it stuck. It is a very heavy and nice looking pan with a "comfort" handle. With a coupon, it was around $32.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

All of Fagor's pressure cookers are induction-ready. We have a couple countertop induction cooktops. It's so nice to cook dinner in the middle of summer without cooking the cook.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I have a single induction unit next to my standard electric stove and I use it all the time. It seems to heat quicker and hotter. I use Le Creuset (the joys of sale and e-bay) and some basic cast-iron skillets.

I love using my induction top to sear in a cast-iron skillet and then finish meats in the oven. Skinless chicken breasts remain juicy inside but develop good color on the outside.

However, one of the reasons I chose to add an induction unit was that I've read its as reactive as gas. Has anyone had this experience? I figure that I can't gain this benefit in cast-iron since the material holds heat so well (an advantage for most cooking applications). Is this hypothesis true for those that have used more than cast-iron on induction?

Also, I've read in Cooks' Illustrated (I think) about Lodge's Logic line of cast iron (available at walmart for about $20 for the big size). This is a pre-seasoned cast-iron pan with a standard handle and an extra grip handle. If I had it to do over, I'd buy this instead of pre-seasoning standard cast-iron (in fact, I'm probably going to buy one of these anyway).


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

"However, one of the reasons I chose to add an induction unit was that I've read its as reactive as gas." I'm not sure as to what is meant. I believe the question (simplified) is "how quickly does the pot/pan heat up relative to different heating technologies?" (The nature of cast iron thermal properties is out of scope.) Cooling off is probably marginally quicker with gas since the ceramic glass will retain more heat than the gas spokes. But I'm talking about epsilon-and-delta levels here; in the big picture it's even. For heating it's going to depend upon the comparative units. I don't see anything else pushing gas and induction out of the first two spots.

As you have pointed out, it will take longer for cast iron to heat up (or cool off) compared to other metals - it has a large mass and a high specific heat. (Stainless steel probably has a higher specific heat but there is comparatively less of it in the same sized pan.) On the other hand, you do gain speed, as your experience shows, in comparison to other heating methods.

In short, forget about "reactive", "specific heat", etc. It does what you want it to do effectively.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

@boxiebabe

BKF = Bar Keeper's Friend. It comes in both powder and liquid cleanser form. I found it at my local Ace Hardware, but it's probably sold in some grocery stores and/or Wal-Mart, etc.

I use the powder form on my All-Clad Stainless. For cleaning the inside and bottom, I sprinkle the BKF on, add water to form a watery paste, then scrub gently *with* the circular grain of the metal. I didn't do this on my first attempt and made very fine lines in the bottom of my pan. No harm except for slightly marring the pretty circular grain on the inside of my brand-new pan. For the shiny outside surface, you can scrub however with the BKF - it doesn't scratch it - at least not that I've noticed.

I don't have an induction cooktop, but hope to someday have one. Hence, when it came time to replace my 10 year old scratched up Mirro non-stick pans, I decided to buy quality pans that could also be used for induction. Honestly, I didn't do much (if any) research. I bought my cookware with credit card points I had saved up for years, and I was limited to using the points at Cooking.com. I simply chose All-Clad Stainless because I didn't know of any other brand that offered induction compatible cookware. After reading this forum, I've discovered a few brands offered at Cooking.com I could have bought, but honestly, I think All-Clad is the best looking. So far, I've loved cooking with my All-Clad pans - heats evenly, food hasn't burned, cleans up easily.

My only complaint is that even though the handles look great (I'm referring to the long handles; the loop handles work fine), they aren't very comfortable to lift and hold the pans with. On the 1.5 qt pan, it's not bad. But on the 3 qt pan, it's awkward. Even so, it's not so annoying that it would have kept me from buying it had I known ahead of time. Still, it's something for those of you still researching to keep in mind.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Best cookware for induction?

Saladmaster, hands down!
It will blow you a way it's so fast.

(like induction though, it's pricey - but sure worth it.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Consumer Reports says "Best Induction Cookware"... KitchenAid... inexpensive yet sturdy! You can spend your money on All-Clad, Le Creuset, Sitram, Mauviel Inducinox or Demeyere... personally I'd rather spend mine on a nice romantic weekend get-away!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

We already had a full set of All-Clad stainless when we bought our Viking induction cooktop, and it works great. That said, my mom has a set of Tramontina pots that work just as well, are nearly as pretty, and cost a fraction of the price. So when it came time to replace the 12" All-Clad non-stick frying pan recently, rather than blowing $250, we headed to Bed Bath with our trusty magnet, and ended up with a Farberware pan that cost less than $50, and works better than the All-Clad did. Spending more doesn't always guarantee better performance.

Speaking of induction cookware, though, does anyone have a suggestion for a teakettle?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

For: floorobsessed

We suggest you check Vermont Country Store. They have three sizes of stainless tea kettle that are induction capable. We have used the large one for many years as our iced tea brewer.
They don't whistle, but ours is magnetic, well made with a plate bottom marked 18/10 and induction. We've seen them elsewhere and in at least one other size but don't recall a brand. We believe they are Italian made.

Here is a link that might be useful: Vermont Country Store


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

FYI, regarding the AC copper, I don't have the All Clad, but I do use the Emeril brand ("fake" All Clad) on my induction, and it works great. The instructions say to use caution not to put empty pan on burner because the copper would melt.

I do know that all All Clad is NOT OK for Induction. Usually I've found that if it says "tri-ply, it is not induction ready. That said, copper isn't supposed to work either and I've had no trouble.

Just an FYI to a previous post on this thread.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I was at Boston store last night and saw a set of Anolon cookware with a narrow band of copper around the outside of the pan,very nice. It had a picture on the box showing the build, full cap base, alayer of aluminum encased in copper & more aluminum,finished with an impact-bonded magnetized stainlesssteel cap. Stainless handles, flush riveted, and induction suitable. Anolon a trademark of Meyer. Meyer has a big unbrella just like Whirlpool.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I have been using the German Gastro USU (Schulte-ufer) 14 inch non stick frying pan and have been very happy with it so far. I would love to know what other people think and if they have tried their 2 and 4 quart sauce pans for cooking rice, sauces, etc. USU can be found at TJ's or Marshall's if you check frequently. I had terrible luck with the Wolfgangpuck 10 inch omelet pan and would NOT recommend it. Very lightweight and it is impossible to cook eggs without major sticking and frustration. I found and Italian made non stick omelet pan Noir Professional that was only $9.99 at TJ's that works great!!! I am just concerned that at that price it will not perform long. Anyone else tried this one or have other suggestions??


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I am rebuilding and am putting an induction cooktop in my new kitchen. Talking to people I got a wonderful tip to keep your stovetop clean, even if you are cooking something like pasta sauce which bubbles and pops and can get messy. Just cover the stove top with baking paper (including under the pot you are cooking with). After the sauce is finished take the saucepan off, remove the baking paper and throw it away if it is too messy. I thought this tip was worth sharing.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

useless tip about paper and throwing it away.
Once you have induction, you don't have things bubbling over.

Induction lets you have the heat you need, precisely.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Let's be real--induction or no (and I have induction), things will sometimes get away from you--particularly if sauteeing or frying. However, no need to get fancy w/ baking paper. Newspaper or a paper towel will work just fine.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Hi -- I am getting set up with a new induction cooktop -- a Bosch -- and got a great deal on a set of All Clad SS that is rated for induction. It just arrived. Question -- I checked the bottoms with a straight edge and found that they are just slightly concave -- I can see a tiny bit under the ruler. Will this be a problem? I can return these if I need to -- but hope it's not an issue: they are beautiful and the price was right. Please advise -- any of you cooking successfully with pans that sit flat around the rim but are not completely flat throughout? Thanks.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

  • Posted by
    geo
    (no@ty.com) on
    Tue, Mar 22, 11 at 23:20

The flatness of the bottom is not important since the magnetic field extends upwards from the cooktop surface and will induce a current in the pots just as well.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I have had and induction cooktop for over 5 years. Tried them all. However, I found Roy Infusion cookware does work and makes no humming sound. It is very inexpensive compared to all others.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

We love our Saladmaster, but here's how everyone can afford them, without your friends pressuring you into paying thousands at yur home demo. We bought our Saladmaster skillet on ebay for $65, not $600. You can buy only what you need of Saladmaster products without paying $2k, $4k or even $10k from estate sales or from people who get suckered into buying the $10k package then need to sell pcs of it to help pay the $360 mo pmt to Bank of Saladmaster, lol. Good products though.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I think you can get good results with many different kinds of pots. Years ago, we got a portable induction "hotplate" when we were remodeling our kitchen; used it with our plain old cast iron and carbon steel frying pans, and LeCreuset and Dansk enameled cast iron, all with great success. I love, love, love cast iron: the thickness of it, the evenness of the heat, and the durability. You can't beat the durability/price quotient....no babying required.

We have just replaced an old Jenn-Air cooktop (utter junk) with a Bosch induction cooktop which we LOVE, and are having fun shopping for some more pots that will be compatible. Got a 10" Kitchen-Aid chef's saute pan with lid at TJ Maxx for $20 yesterday and used it to cook pasta sauce for dinner. It kept the sauce at a slow, even simmer very easily. Looks and feels like a much more expensive pan...heavy, tri-ply all the way up the sides, nicely finished stainless, riveted handle that's well balanced (I too find the All-Clad ergonomically impossible), and a glass lid with black silicon all around the rim for both a nice look and protection from dings. The handle is also padded on the underside with the silicon, so it's very comfortable to grip and doesn't slip.

One thing I don't like about a lot of the pots available now is the glass lids with stainless rims...you always see the weld where the stainless is joined. I'd prefer just a plain old stainless lid...easier to clean and keep looking nice.

We also got an inexpensive ($15) saucepan at TJ Maxx a few weeks ago just to have something to steam rice in. I will probably replace it at some point, but we needed something right away and it worked just fine, especially for the money.

Another good source for pots is IKEA. They offer a lot of cookware that's induction compatible. We have their FAVORIT stockpot and like it. Unfortunately, the cookware is only sold at their stores, and not on their website, although you can look at it on the website.

I think the bottom line is that many things will work, but some things make cooking a lot more fun than others. We certainly notice that with our new cooktop! I'm sure it's the same with pots and pans. I will probably treat my husband to a high-end pot of some sort for his birthday and will enjoy comparing its performance to some of our low- and mid-range items. My advice is, take a magnet when you shop and don't be embarrassed about using it. Also, many pots are now coming with a little pictogram on the bottom showing what type of heat sources they're compatible with. The induction symbol is a series of little loops, sort of like wide cursive letter "L's."

And I agree with the tip about using paper underneath pots to make cleanup easier...our son fried something last week and must have left half a cup of oil spattered all over the cooktop. A sheet of paper placed on top of the cooktop would have made that nightmare SOOOO much easier to deal with! I will definitely be doing that when frying things.


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Forgot to add

Oh, and I saw some nice-looking Dr. Weil's cookware at Tuesday Morning. IDK how good it is though...


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Great discussion, though I'm still not sure which pans to get. I've been buying them and returning them for the past 2 weeks after getting my new GE induction range (inspired by this forum). The range is great, and I LOVE the induction--yes, it is as responsive as gas, but you don't have to lean down to see the size of the flame--just press a button and it goes from boiling to simmer instantly. Also, the speed at which it is able to boil is incredible. I keep joking that watching water boil is now fun, because I have to show everyone who comes over. A real crowd pleaser! :)

Anyway, in my pan adventures, I got a set of the Anolon Nouvelle Copper, mentioned above, which apparently being discontinued. I had some non-induction Anolon pieces and I loved them, so was excited to see this set. However, I was really disappointed when I put the largest pot on with a 3-4 quarts of water and it did not boil even after 15 minutes..slower than gas! So I ran a little test using various sizes of the Anolon, some old enamel-covered steel pots that I've had for around 20 years, and Le Creuset. To my amazement, the Anolon took 40--100% longer to boil the same amount of water, studied over several tests. The Le Creuset was the fastest. So, suffice it to say that although a magnet will tell you whether the pan will heat, more research is needed to figure out which are the "best" pans.

Since a large part of the appeal of induction is both speed to boil (we eat a lot of pasta) and energy savings from not leaving the pots cooking for so long, I will be doing similar tests with any other pots I get. Without good pans, I won't get these benefits. I'm curious whether anyone else has done similar tests?

Oh, and one more note about cast iron, which I really like and which also works great on my stove: I've heard that when you cook with cast iron, a little bit of the iron can leach into your food. This is a good thing, usually, since many people don't get enough iron in their diets. I like the thought of that a lot better than a little bit of teflon leaching in every time I cook.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

and guess when nikkibu first registered? oh same day as the post.

No, nikki, if it works on induction, it works quickly. That's the nature of induction.

Re cast iron--- cast iron responds to temp changes slowly. So cast iron will take a bit of time to change from boil to simmer, and so forth. Even tho the induction cooker will change very quickly, a cast iron pot will be slow to change, hotter or cooler, because cast iron retains heat more than stainless steel, or copper, or most other pot materials. nikki, if you had induction, and cast iron among other pots, you would have known this easily.


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It's so nice to see your post, I appreciate it very much!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Re the use of paper on the hob - it's something I decided to do from the outset. While splashes is one thing (mine's next to the sink - so could get splashed from there) the other thing about putting paper on the top - it'll help protect the glass from scratches.

I've also discovered the hob works with the pan lifted about half an inch off the hob - so if you have pans that haven't got totally flat bottoms, I wouldn't worry.

I got the cooker 2 days ago and pans yesterday - including a pressure cooker - which cuts down heating time for additional savings.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I've enjoyed reading all the posts. I have an IKEA induction cooktop & have to say I love it. If you don't have an induction cooktop & are considering one, check out IKEA. It's made by whirlpool & has a 5 year warranty. It definitely rivals the expensive brands in features at in most cases half the price. I paid $999 for mine less 20% for purchasing 3 appliances at once. I purchased a few of their pans too. The rest I've purchased at TJ, Home Goods & Kohls. I just carry my magnet. I have a buffet/hodge podge of pots & pans (IKEA, All Clad, Emeril, etc.) & honestly still don't have a favorite. I do like the glass lid with the escaping steam hole. My IKEA has just a stainless lid with the escaping steam hole.

OK, now my question: I'm in the market for a 12 qt stock pot. I'm getting tired of using one of my old (smaller stock pots) inside my large induction fry pan. Anything that splashes over gets cooked on the fry pan & is a bear to clean out. I cook a lot & can be very messy. I'm looking at buying the Johnson-Rose INDUCTION STOCK POT, CROWN SELECT, 12 QT., 11" DIA. X 7-1/8" D, W/O COVER, HEAVY DUTY 18-10 STAINLESS STEEL W/1.0 GAUGE ALUMINUM SANDWICH BOTTOM (ALUMINUM PAD/MAGNETIZED S/S DISC) for $48.61. I don't know anything about this brand, but the price sounds good. Does anyone know anything about this brand?

Also, I never thought of using newspaper on my stove while cooking. What a great idea. I'm sure the parchment would be OK, just a little leery about using newspaper. Do you just spread it over the entire cooktop, then place the pot/pan on top & cook away. This will certainly save some clean up time (if I can remember to do it). Thanks everyone for all the good posts. Great ideas everyone.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I just placed baking parchment in two sections as its not wide enough to cover it in one go. I'd like to find some thin heat-resistant sillicone rubber mats - like the material used for bakeware. Unfortunately, one can lose sight of the heating zones - so transparent material would allow the location marks to show through - also, the power level indicator is on the top of the hob as well.

The covering idea was mainly to protect the hob from scratching rather than making easy-clean. Ideally, I'd like something like place-setting mats - better size for the dishwasher!


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Has anyone tried Paderno's induction cookware? Would you recommend it?

Here is a link that might be useful: paderno cookware site


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Hi dccnm, I got my Induction Cooktop this year (March, 2012) & absolutely love it. My old cookware was from the 70's, so even though it still worked, felt I'd at least gotten my money's worth from it. I've purchased all different brands of cookware from all different stores, i.e., IKEA, Kohls, Home Goods, TJ Maxx. They all work well. One thing I've found is that with the heavier stainless cookware, I have more even heat & the cookware has been easy to clean. My recommendation to you is to buy the sizes you like. Carry your magnet with you (I have a magnet on my purse closure & use that). If the botttom of the pan sticks well to the magnet, then it will work for you. The sizes and everything else is a matter of preference. I don't use the non-stick skillets because I choose not to eat the coating. Hope this helps. P.S. Did I mention that I love, love my induction cooktop? I really like the on/off feature, the ability to simmer, just everything is better. I have the IKEA induction cooktop which is made by whirlpool & has a 5 year warranty. It's also a whole lot cheaper than the rest of the induction cooktops. Good luck.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Just getting a new Bosch Induction and thought my collection of 2005 All Clad copper core would work but they won�t! Contacted All Clad and they have changed the copper core line to be induction capable in the past few years. I am so disappointed I paid allot of money for the copper core and we won�t be able to use it! I wanted to mention this because I went to the All Clad website first and it list the copper core as being induction ready but no mention that it has only been so three years or so. Be aware and bring a magnet to double check.
Trying to pick up only the pieces I need now. I will not spend the same amount I spent on the All Clad again. They are very heavy and my wife will not use them. I am looking at the ARCHETUN
11.5" Open Fry pan for a non stick fry pan. I could only find it for sale here: http://www.heritagemint.com/Z58012.html
Also looking at the Anolon Cookware Set, 11 Piece Nouvelle Copper. I am still looking for reviews for this product line. From this review of a Fry Pan shoot out: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/804287 it looks like copper core would be the way to go.
Thoughts? Thanks


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I am very happy with my Paderno "Classic II" Induction-compatible cookware. High-quality and Canadian made. Pots fit very well on induction range, and perform beautifully. They also have easy-pour rims, and good handles for grip. Paderno has a big sale in November each year... you can get a 14 piece set for under $300 Cdn. (regular price is $1000)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I bought a 12 piece set of Cuisinart Multiclad Pro as my "starter" set, it was about $275. I have a few older pieces of Cuisinart Multiclad which worked well but they weren't induction-compatible. My kitchen isn't done yet but the GE slide-in got plugged in and I heated some soup in the smaller pot--heard a faint buzzing but that's it. It has comfy handles, clad all the way up the sides, flared rim for pouring. I think the set I bought is being phased out in favor of a newly designed handle, so if you check around, you might find it for even less $$.

Any suggestions for an induction-ready non-stick skillet which is reasonably priced? I really do prefer non-stick for foods like scrambled eggs.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Has anyone used the new Demeyere Industry line at Sur La Table? On induction?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Excellent website to explain induction cookware.

Here is a link that might be useful: Induction Cooking, Induction Cookware


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

> Has anyone used the new Demeyere Industry line at Sur La Table?

We looked at it last weekend, but have not used it. The construction looks very similar to All-Clad (similar thickness, saucepans are clad all the way up the sides). I assume it's intended to compete with All Clad.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I just installed a bosch 36 inch 50 amp induction. None of my cookware worked so I made a quick run to goodwill with a magnet to get something to cook with while I shop. One saucepan was a ss disk bottom pan. The other was an enameled iron pot. When I tried the saucepan on power boost, the stainless steel disc discolored with a bluish stain that barkeepers would not remove. An online search indicated that this is common when using very high heat on stainless steel and that the stains were permanent. This bosch induction will boost to 4.4kw on the large burner. Nothing so far on this forum has addressed this high heat issue. I do not want this to happen when I buy new cookware. Does anybody have experience with this?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Both stainless steel & cast iron prefer to be warmed up gradually, before using the maximum heat setting (& that isn't unique to induction burners at all); that being said however, I am often in a hurry and will rush a pot with the power boost setting to bring a pot of water to a boil quickly. Yes, sometimes I think there may be a slight bluish effect on the *inside* bottom of the stainless steel pot, but it doesn't bother me. (It has also happened when cooking on electric elements.) I find vinegar (alone or with baking soda) will remove any discoloration (when I want all my pots to sparkle like new inside & out!) That goes for removing any stain from SS cookware... vinegar is a miracle worker!
If you really don't want the inside of your pots to discolor, the solution is to warm the pot gradually (before you throw in the food), until you reach the temperature you want to cook at... then add your food & cook with the sizzling heat.
Hope this is of some help.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

One of my old-style electric burners blew out a couple of months ago, and I replaced it with a portable induction burner (Max Burton 6200 Deluxe 1800-Watt Induction Cooktop, $91 from Amazon). It's pretty nice. But like many of you, I had to get some new cookware. Unlike many of you, I'm cheap.

I don't know that this entire T-fal non-stick model works with induction, but the 8" and 10.25" fry pans that I have do work (T-fal Professional Total Nonstick Oven Safe Thermo-Spot Heat Indicator Fry Pan/Saute Pan Dishwasher Safe Cookware, $22 and $32 dollars).

I needed some pots, too, and this stainless T-fal set came on sale at Amazon for $80: T-fal C798SC64 Ultimate Stainless Steel Copper-Bottom Multi-Layer Base 12-Piece Cookware Set, Silver. I haven't yet learned how to use stainless pans without things sticking and burning, but otherwise, these seem very nice. They do heat up fast on my induction burner, and they have aluminum and a copper slug in the bottom for even heating, with in addition some attractive copper inlay on the outside bottoms.

Finally, I've ordered a Cuisinox Whistling Kettle for $35, which hasn't come yet, but is purported to work on induction.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I'm a long-time lurker, but infrequent poster. I'm also shopping for induction cookware, and long ago went past the "fun" part. I'm well into "c'mon, guys, where's my perfect pan?" territory. All I want are pans that will last forever and have really comfortable handles. It also has to be able to go into the oven. Flared or rolled rims for easy pouring is nice, too. I don't care about sets, but price is an issue.

I do have some experience with disk-bottom cookware. I have a 1.5 qt saucepan and an 8-qt dutch oven. I've had both of mine for about 11 years and am beginning to see some rust around the seam where the disk meets the pot. Otherwise they've held up fine. Has anyone else seen this?

The rust worries me. I don't like replacing cookware, except disposable non-stick. My other saucepans are all stainless Calphalon Tri-Ply, 11 yrs old and sadly, not magnetic. I did pick up a new induction Calphalon try-ply frypan a month ago. It appears to cook like my older stuff, but with age (mine) I'm finding the handles aren't as comfy as they used to be, especially on the larger saucepan. Better than All Clad handles, no question, but still. It's not an issue with the big fry pan, because it's so heavy, I need two hands to pan-toss food.

So the search continues. I've just ordered a Sur La Table 3.5qt clad saucepan, it should arrive next week. The handle looks like it will be very comfortable. Film at 11! If you've found saucepans with great handles, I'd love to read about them.

No one seems to be mentioning carbon steel fry pans. Those are amazing. About the same thickness and weight as fully clad stainless, but almost completely non-stick. I like clad stainless for making acidic pan sauces, but for everything else, carbon steel rocks. It can take very high heat and go straight into the oven, making it great for searing steaks. It's also excellent for delicate eggs and crepes. Another plus, it's priced very close to all but the cheapest non-stick and will last forever, like cast iron without the weight. A win-win. It's great on induction. I've pitched all of my teflon-coated stuff, and happily. Has anyone else made the switch?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

My two cents:
I recommend the 'Classic II' ss pots & pans made by Paderno (PEI, Canada). They are extremely well made high-quality ss & also have the rolled lip. (There are no welding points on the inside of the pots to trap food, as is often the case in other ss pots.) The handles fit well in my hands, with a good solid grip under the thumb (doesn't cut into the fingers or hands like some do), and the pans & lids go from stove top to oven (up to 500F). The pots all have a 25-year warranty.
Not all Paderno cookware lines are induction-friendly, and not all lines are made in Canada, so check carefully before selecting. The 'Classic II' line is both induction compatible & made in Canada. (Lots of professional chefs use Paderno's pots, including the Prime Minister's chef.) If you get them on sale, a great 14-piece set can be had for $300 (reg. $900 -$1000). There are several sales each year, so well worth waiting!
http://paderno.com/shop/category/classic-paderno/

I used the original "Classic" line from Paderno on my old non-induction stove for 30 years, and they still look like new. I never had a problem or repair in all those years. (But I had to hand the old, non-induction, set over to my kids when I switched to induction.)

Here is a link that might be useful: paderno canada


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

My two cents:
I recommend the 'Classic II' ss pots & pans made by Paderno (PEI, Canada). They are extremely well made high-quality ss & also have the rolled lip. (There are no welding points on the inside of the pots to trap food, as is often the case in other ss pots.) The handles fit well in my hands, with a good solid grip under the thumb (doesn't cut into the fingers or hands like some do), and the pans & lids go from stove top to oven (up to 500F). The pots all have a 25-year warranty.
Not all Paderno cookware lines are induction-friendly, and not all lines are made in Canada, so check carefully before selecting. The 'Classic II' line is both induction compatible & made in Canada. (Lots of professional chefs use Paderno's pots, including the Prime Minister's chef.) If you get them on sale, a great 14-piece set can be had for $300 (reg. $900 -$1000). There are several sales each year, so well worth waiting!
http://paderno.com/shop/category/classic-paderno/

I used the original "Classic" line from Paderno on my old non-induction stove for 30 years, and they still look like new. I never had a problem or repair in all those years. (But I had to hand the old, non-induction, set over to my kids when I switched to induction.)

Here is a link that might be useful: paderno canada


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

sorry... duplicate posting by accident

This post was edited by Bree2 on Sat, Jun 1, 13 at 19:49


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

btw, on my induction stove, I also like to use cast iron pans--great for non-acidic foods; an enamel pot for quick water boils; and a very nice Lagostina (commercial grade) ss pot with a rounded bottom which is great for stirring sauces. My only complaint about the lagostina pot is that it has weld spots inside the pot (not as easy to clean) and has a slippery/hard-to-hold handle (when pouring).
I have not tried carbon steel... was told they do not heat very evenly...but no experience myself.

This post was edited by Bree2 on Sat, Jun 1, 13 at 19:51


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Bree2 - Thanks for the rec. on Paderno. It looks like these are disk construction. Is that right? I know disk bottoms work well for many cooks, but I'm a little wary of them. Unnecessarily perhaps, but I can't get beyond the fact that both of mine are beginning to show rust at the disk seam. I would feel like I need to baby them to prevent it.

I've got two Lodge cast iron pieces, but they don't get nearly the use my carbon steel and clad stainless get. I've had some sticking issues with them that I don't get with my other pans. They likely just need a lot more use to lose their stickiness. I may have to loan them to my son until they're really well-seasoned. :)

Addressing uneven heating in carbon steel, it may be that the very thin, cheap carbon steel pieces that are stamped from one piece of steel, handle and all, have hot spots. I can't say. I can say that IME and in all the hundreds (literally) of reviews I've read for Lodge, Paderno (Italian, not Canadian) and deBuyer steel pans, I've only seen one review that mentioned uneven heating. That was for a Lodge, and I suspect the reviewer may have received a defective pan; none of the other Lodge reviews mention this.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I'm no expert on the construction, and can't say whether they are "disk construction" or not, but there are no seams visible--it seems all one piece, and no, definitely no rust has ever appeared; several of my friends/family have Paderno pots and no problems with theirs either. Mine have never been babied, that's for sure! (If you wanted more specific manufacturing info, they have a toll-free number on their site. I found them helpful with my questions when I was choosing pots for induction.)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Upon further examination of my pots, I do believe you are correct: there does seem to be a very faint line or ridge where the bottom "disk" meets the body of the pot. It may well be a seam, but I can't say for sure. (Sorry, I didn't see it prior to responding earlier today.) Nevertheless, no problems to report.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Re:

"No one seems to be mentioning carbon steel fry pans. Those are amazing. About the same thickness and weight as fully clad stainless, but almost completely non-stick. I like clad stainless for making acidic pan sauces, but for everything else, carbon steel rocks. It can take very high heat and go straight into the oven, making it great for searing steaks. It's also excellent for delicate eggs and crepes. Another plus, it's priced very close to all but the cheapest non-stick and will last forever, like cast iron without the weight. A win-win. It's great on induction. I've pitched all of my teflon-coated stuff, and happily. Has anyone else made the switch?"

"Carbon Steel" ?? How do these fare for not going rusty particularly if dishwashed ?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Don't EVER put carbon steel or cast iron in the dishwasher. Get it??


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

And the line is not rust, but likely carbon. Cast iron rusts, stainless doesn't.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

How do the carbon steel pans hold up with things like onions? My carbon steel knives always discolored and often transferred a metallic taste to the food I cut with them...

Thanks,


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

"And the line is not rust, but likely carbon. Cast iron rusts, stainless doesn't."

True, but I have no idea what's in the disk. Perhaps something there, maybe the bonding material, has rusted. Whatever it is, it can't be cleaned. I'm not worried about cosmetics, just functionality and longevity.

I'm just not a fan. Purely subjective, but still.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

"How do the carbon steel pans hold up with things like onions? My carbon steel knives always discolored and often transferred a metallic taste to the food I cut with them..."

burntfingers,

They're fine, because they're seasoned, like cast iron. But they are reactive, and like cast iron, acidic foods can strip the seasoning.

Mine are the Force Blue line, mid-weight, so they heat quickly and evenly and don't weigh a ton. They're close to clad stainless or thick aluminum in weight.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Has anyone purchased and cooked with the new Williams-Sonoma Thermo-clad tri-ply stainless cookware? Its supposed to be made by Demeyere for WS (named after Demeyere's wife Hestah) . It looks and feels absolutely wonderful. The handles are MUCH more comfortable than All Clad's, even the All Clad D5 which seems slightly better than the Tri-ply.

I am awaiting a GE induction slide-in induction range and using the time to look for good cookware to replace my wonderful Lifetime cookware which are non-magnetic.

I have not been able to find any independent reviews yet, except for some customer reviews on WS website. (I think they came out around Nov/Dec 2012)

Here is a link to see and read about them:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/205476/?catalogId=45&bnrid=3120901&cm_ven=Google_PLA&cm_cat=Cookware&cm_pla=Cookware_Sets&cm_ite=Williams-Sonoma_Thermo-CladTM_Stainless-Steel_10-Piece_Cookware_Set&srccode=cii_17588969&cpncode=31-196000349-2

I hope it is ok to repost this here (I tried starting a new list but haven't had any replies)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Help! I just purchased an induction cooktop and am hopeful I can use my 20+ year old Saladmaster pots and pans. Will they work or not? I really hate to give them up but I'm also looking forward to the new form of cooking.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

if they are magnetic at the base, then you can use them.

Test with a magnet, and if the magnet sticks to the base of the pan, they will work.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I just took a quick look at the Saladmaster web page, and it indicates their pots are compatible with induction: take a look at the bottom of this link:

http://www.saladmaster.com/index/WhySaladmaster/FeaturesandBenefits.nws


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Good for you. I'm surprised that they (Saladmaster) were making their cookware compatible with induction cooktops 20 years ago. I purchased most of my old cookware in the 70's & 80's. I didn't like having to give it up (when I got my induction cooktop), but I'm glad I did. I've purchased a medley of cookware for my induction cooktop & Wow! what a difference it's made for me in my cooking.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Studioksr,

I like the weight, balance and design of the Thermo-Clad, but haven't purchased any so can't say how it cooks.

I have purchased a saucier from Demeyere's Industry line (for SLT) and like how it performs. It's pretty hefty (I'm weak-wristed) but the balance is wonderful. The handle fork is so wide that weight is distributed over a goodly portion of the pan.

Right now, there's a sale on the Demeyere Proline 11" skillet at BB&B's website, $199. Order it at the store and it will ship to your home for free. Add a 20% in-store coupon and your price is $150 + tax. That's a sweet deal.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I recently installed a Bosch induction cooktop ( which I love) & went on the cookware search. I ended up with several random brands & invested in 2 Demeyere pans, the Proline skillet & a saucepan. They have a beautiful finish & weight, but I will not purchase any more Demeyere. I do not find them easy to clean, the pouring lip on the saucepan is awful & everything sticks in that Proline skillet, even though I have followed seasoning instructions several times. My favorite pans are from the Fissler Solea line- they cook wonderfully, clean easily & have an ingenious lid design.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Bev,

Have you used any aluminum cookware on your Bosch with great success? Weight is the reason I won't be purchasing any more Demeyere pieces. I haven't had any problems with food sticking to the Proline, at least no more than with my other clad stainless pans. But they are really hefty, with 7 thick plies. for those who don't know, they're about twice as thick as All-Clad or my Calphalon Tri-Ply. So, I'm looking for aluminum, in any form, so long as it has an induction base. My thing is, I like a thick pan for even heating, about 3mm or more in aluminum.

I scored a pair of Mauviel M'Stone pieces for almost nothing on Black Friday, but I'm holding off on more until I get my induction range in January. The waiting is killing me! while I wait, I'm looking at every line I can, so appreciate suggestions.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Bev,

One more thing! Try pouring some oil in your cold pan, enough to cover the base of the pan. Heat until shimmering, or just barely showing a single wisp of smoke, but no hotter. Pour out the oil, wipe your pan dry and let it cool. This will really increase your nonstick performance, whether you're cooking with oil or not. It lasts until you scrub the pan. Me, I'm an aggressive scrubber of stainless steel, so I normally wait for the Leidenfrost (mercury ball) effect, add oil and back the heat way down. I get easy release that way in all my stainless pans.

Thanks for the Solea rec. How do they compare, weight-wise, to the Fissler Original Pro? If you would be so kind as to weigh one, without the lid, in any size, I'd really be grateful.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Bev,

Re the Fissler - do the glass lids have a vent hole in them somewhere - or how else do the pans vent ? Are the lids dished in the middle so condensate drops off them at the centre of the lid ? I'm trying to figure out if they're going to blow water drops out between the pan and the lid - that's what I've not figured out. I'd not come across the Fissler name before so thanks for finding them! :)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Just bought a Viking induction range thinking I would use my cast iron pans, and see Viking says not to use cast iron as it retains heat and could damage the ceramic cooktop.
I particularly like cast iron for browning foods. Any advice out there?


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Yes, do not slide the pans across the surface of the hob.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

You can place a silpat or parchment paper under your cast iron if you are worried about moving it around. I just try to be careful.

Make sure you clean off any spilled salt/sugar, as that can cause scratches under pans.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

I have just a single induction burner and I find that when I use my cast iron skillet after a period of time it beeps and I get an error message. It's too hot. And I'm cooking it on medium heat, never on high. Rather disappointing.

The same thing is said about the smooth-top electric ranges, but I've never had an issue with using my cast-iron on it.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

jasdip, i have both a single induction plate (Frigidaire) and an induction cooktop (Electrolux) and use cast iron pots & pans without any problems; and when cooking dried beans (kidney beans), the cast iron pot simmers away on the hob for a couple of hours or more. So I think it is the quirkiness of certain pans on certain cooktops, rather than incompatibility per se, that causes some issues. I have one stainless steel pot that squeaks and whines on occasion, whereas other stainless steel pots do not. If you know anyone with induction, why not try your pan on their hobs to see if it is the pan or the induction plate that is misbehaving.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Thanks for your input Bree. I don't know of anyone with an induction stove but I can always just use my ci skillet sparingly on the induction burner.....stick to my electric coils. I just found it quite perturbing, when it says on the instructions that cast iron is a favourable cookware.

BTW, there wasn't anything in the troubleshooting of what E6 meant. I had to google it. (overheating)


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Hi jasdip,

Sorry I'm late to the party. If you're searing, that's quick, right? Do you get the error then?

I think if it were me, I'd likely test the pan to see when the error occurs. Then you'll know how you can use the pan.

Sandy


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Hi Sandy, I just saw this post now.
Yes, I'm browning hamburger for instance, and then have it at a simmer for sloppy joes. It starts to beep and Error at level 3, so I'll have to cook everything at 1.

I will pay more close attention to see when it starts to get the over-heat error. I have been pulling the skillet off the heat halfway.


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RE: Best cookware for induction?

Jasdip, I only use my cast iron for quick things, like a sear or fried eggs/potatoes.

Sounds like the simmer is long enough that the CI is holding too much heat for the hob. I use a SS sauté pan for sloppy joes and it works fine. I'd be leery of the ketchup removing my hard-won seasoning on the CI but maybe you're using enameled.

I just got my induction this past summer, so haven't used my ECI dutch oven on it for longish simmers. That's strictly a winter cooking style where I'm at!


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