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One Pot---Two Pots

Posted by gardenlad (My Page) on
Thu, Jan 25, 07 at 11:27

While posting a resonse on the crock-pot thread I mentioned that a cast iron Dutch oven, enameled or not, is the most versatile piece of cookware you can have.

I really believe that; whether we're talking a modern type, or the original legged variety that you can bake in. If somebody said I could only have one pot or pan, a cast iron Dutch oven would be my choice.

If that person said I could only have two, my second choice would go to a wok. There aren't a whole lot of things that can't be cooked in one or the other of those two.

What about everyone else. What would be your choices for a one-pot and a two-pot kitchen?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

gardenlad, I think you've got it -- but I'd reverse:

One pot, I'll take a wok.
(In fact, a 16" carbon steel with ears.)

Two pots, I'll add a round 5 quart.
(I have a couple 5-6 quart pots in different materials I use constantly but I suspect the Staub version would be an improvement on my current kitchen pals.)


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

1) a good 6-7 qt. enameled cast iron Dutch oven
2) cast iron wok


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

If limited to one pan, I'd look for versatility first. So I would go with a 5-qt deep saute pan. If pressed, I could cook just about everything in it.

If limited to two pans, I would add a 4-qt sauce pan.

I'm not saying that these are necessarily my favorites but that if limited, I would choose them for their ability to let me cook the most dishes.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

What a great topic! For a one-pot kitchen I'd choose the Le Creuset saucepan with a lid that doubles as a small skillet.

Add a Chinese chef's knife and a good cutting board and you have a complete batterie de cuisine. For a two-pot kitchen I'd live with the above for a while and see what else I found I wanted.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

Ironic that woks are never included in starter sets.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

Ya have to be leery of projecting, KitchenDetective. Folks on this forum tend to be more sophisticated about cookery. But I bet the average household does not contain a wok, and the cook in the family wouldn't know how to use one.

So, from a well-stocked kitchen point of view, I wouldn't be without one. But from a marketing point of view, I wouldn't put one in a starter set either.

It's like knife sets. A filet knife is actually one of the most versatile blades you can have in the kitchen. But you won't find them in basic knife sets.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

Good point, gardenlad. Also, most sets of pots are made of materials less suitable for a wok.

Very crafty, velodoug, savoring your second pot pick while enjoying a pair already!!


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

One of the saddest moments in my kitchen remodel was having to give away my two woks - they won't work on my glass cooktop. I replaced one of them with a flat-bottomed cheapie from IKEA, but it's not the same. Sniff.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

Are flat-bttomed woks flat-bottomed on the inside, too? If so, then it's more of an evasee, no? I've never looked inside one, I just realized. (Behind the curve on cultural awareness, I guess.)


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

kitchendetective -- Yes, and no. Carbon steel woks are the same shape on the inside and the outside because they're made of thin material. But I've seen cast iron woks that are flat bottomed on the outside and curved on the inside. The difference between a flat-bottomed wok and the evasees I've seen is that the flat area in the bottom of the wok is much smaller in relation to the overall size.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

Velodoug--yes, my cast iron one is flatish on the bottom (sort of has concentric rings, but the whole thing works on a wok ring anyway--)but it is completely curved inside. My steel one is as you describe. I was wondering more about the copper and stainless steel cookware types, not that I would buy one.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots Another View

Here's something that I did not consider when choosing pans ;)

Wouldn't a Lodge be better?

Here is a link that might be useful: Yet another vote for one good pan


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

kitchendetective,

In all the years I cooked primarily with cast iron, that actually was one thought that did go through my mind! I'm not very large or strong, and thought a good hard whack with a pan (preferably hot) possibly could work, lol.


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RE: One Pot---Two Pots

So, too, can a .45 between the eyeballs!

If more people were willing to protect themselves there would be less violent crime in this country.


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