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Ode to Soup

Posted by coolbeans (My Page) on
Mon, Dec 30, 13 at 19:54

I love to cook, but truth be told, it's not always creative. I tend to follow recipes with some variations. Except when it comes to soup. No recipes, just whatever's on hand and I'm in the mood for. Tonight I made a hearty yet healthy turkey soup featuring homemade stock, shiitake mushrooms, roasted red peppers, and veggies. It made my house smell wonderful, delighted my family, and made me very happy. I hope that 2014 is filled with equally satisfying meals for you and your loved ones, too.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Ode to Soup

"---I hope that 2014 is filled with equally satisfying meals for you and your loved ones, too.---"

Thank you. To all of you, may you and your loved ones enjoy those meals in good health and lots of happiness.

dcarch


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RE: Ode to Soup

I thought you meant my ode (odious ode, but an ode that was well intended) from 2009!


RE: What's For Dinner #289
•Posted by rob333 (My Page) on Fri, Jan 9, 09 at 9:51

An ode to Ohiomom's soups
I love you Ohiomom
I love your Cooking in Cleveland blog
For yesterday your tasty stew was a lunch delight
Vulturing workers salviated for a treat of chicken stew
They ooo-ed, they ah-ed and praised your aromas
Singing, "Oh it's homemade, no wonder!"

Secretly I knew it was Ohiomom's recipe
That smelled and tasted so good

Yumming every bite, while eating cod and scallops chowder
My night time meal did sate and delight
Your recipes are amazingly good and hearty
You make my "diet" delicious, delectable even!
Now I weigh a healthier 33 pounds less.

I raise my spoon to you Ohiomom. I bow to your soup and stew prowess.

(Ok, maybe not lyrical, but a song of high praise nonetheless.)


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RE: Ode to Soup

For soup lovers, remember national soup swap day is January 25, 2014.


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RE: Ode to Soup

My DD is becoming a very good cook, and she makes great soup. Monday dinner is always soup, our favorite is loaded baked potato soup with cheese bread croutons, grated cheddar and sour cream for garnish.

Happy New Year.


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RE: Ode to Soup

Your soup sounds wonderful - I love mushrooms in soup.

Greek style chicken is our favorite.
After making the soup whisk together 5 eggs and the juice and zest of two lemons (the zest is very important to the flavor). Add soup a ladle at a time to the egg mixture while whisking vigorously to prevent cooking egg (great if someone is there to help you). When almost all of the broth has been added to the egg mixture return mixture to soup pan and gently stir to combine.

Delicious!

Soups indeed rock!

Soup amount is about 3-4 liters.


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RE: Ode to Soup

I made a HUGE pot of soup from the leftover Xmas roasted vegetables and prime rib bones with all their wonderful seasoning. Everyone wanted the recipe.... which, probably, can never be reproduced.

This afternoon a friend gave me several bags of leftovers from last night's party. I can't wait to make a soup from the roasted vegetables and ham. If I get enough I'll take some to her in thanks for her generosity.

I do LOVE soup!


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RE: Ode to Soup

I learned early cooking skills from my Grandmother and Dad. Can't remember NOT kknowing how to make veggie/beef, turkey/noodle, split pea (later called Exorcist soup) and navy bean. I consider all of these "dump" recipes... no precise ingredients or amounts necessary. BUT Nana always said a bay leave was essential.

Turkey soup... neck and carcass simmered in water for stock. Add some celery, onions & carrots. Add noodles (or whatever pasta you like) near the end. Season & eat.

Veggie/beef... brown beef (I like mine cut to bite size) & bones then cover with water. Add celery, carrots, onions, and bay leaf. Some kinda tomato product... crushed, diced, even sauce will work. Cabbage, if ya have it... once used box of little frozen brussell sprouts. Any left-over veggies from fridge or a few handfuls of frozen... corn, green beans, peas. She always added a big handful of barley and navy beans. Didn't usually add potatoes... they got mushy.

She also made somethhing she called "Canadian Stew"?!? We're NOT Canadian and have NO idea where she came up with recipe. Like veggie/beef except EVERYTHING in it is BIG. Big hunka beef (like for pot roast), celery and carrots only cut in half. Onions either halved or a bunch of small ones. Some kinda tomato produce, bay leaf (of course), covered with water and simmered till meat was about falling apart. She'd add potatoes during last 20-30 miinutes so didn't get mushy. She ALWAYS made home-made bread with this. The meat and veggies went oon a plate and the delicious broth in a bowl or BIG mug.

Always torn between bean or split pea when a nice ham bone is available. Bone, bay leaf, COC, bag-o dried beans/peas, cover with water and simmer til "done".

And about her MANDATORY bay leaf!?! Though I followed her rules, had NO idea it even had a flavor until I was married and bought my own!?! Thinkiing hers werre ANCIENT!?!


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RE: Ode to Soup

I made Chicken Cordon Bleu for Christmas dinner and had quite a bit leftover.

Made a pot of Chicken Cordon Bleu Soup with some of the leftovers. I think I found the recipe on Tasty Kitchen, just subbed chopped up cordon bleu for the chicken in the recipe, added a bit more ham and swiss. It was delicious!

We love soup in the winter, make it often. I have a boatload of soup recipes from having an annual soup party every October for the last 8 or 9 years!

Linda


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RE: Ode to Soup

Not sooup, but SIL makes a MEAN chicken salad with left-over Buffalo (breaded, baked or fried) chicken tenders.


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RE: Ode to Soup

klseiverd, the guys at The Bitten Word did a little head-to-head comparison of chicken stock made with bay leaves and chicken stock without bay leaves. Their conclusion was"meh."

Here is a link that might be useful: The Bitten Word on bay leaves


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RE: Ode to Soup

I have a small bay "tree"... maybe 2 feet tall in a pot. Temps in NJ are iffy about survival rate outside during winter. It goes out on my deck in May and comes back in in late OCtober. About March last year, found it seriously neglected in rarely used dining room... totally wilted. Immediately gave it a BIG soak, but it didn't come back. I gave it a "kill it or cure it" trim that yielded a LOT of dried leaves that have a nice aroma. Think stuff my grandmother had was SOOOO far beyond how long "they" say herbs/spices can be kept, wasn't even funny??


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RE: Ode to Soup

I don't make many soups. I like them, just don't really know how to do it :)

I currently have a large ham simmering with potatoes and green beans. The last time we had that I made a potato and leek soup from some of the ham broth and it was delicious. We don't care for split pea soup at all, so I wasn't sure what else to do with the broth.


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