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Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

Posted by ginnyginny (My Page) on
Tue, Dec 28, 10 at 15:05

I enjoy potatoes in vegetable soups but they always seem to get mushy even though I try not to overcook them. I use russet potatoes. Is there another type of potato that will hold it's shape better?

Thanks and Happy New Year to all my GardenWeb friends.

Ginny


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

Almost any potato will hold up better than russets...red, Yukon gold, fingerlings, long white etc...
Linda C


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

I've had the best luck with redskin or Yukon gold potatoes.


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

I see where my mistake has been. No more russets for me unless their baked. It's amazing how much I have yet to learn and I've been cooking for 35 years!!

Thanks.

Ginny


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

Or, just use russets but add them later.


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

I always use red skin potatoes and most of the time with the skin on.

It is supposed to get really get cold in the next couple of days so soup or stew will be on the menu!


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

Ginny, besides baking, russets are my favorite variety for raw frying.


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

The red potatoes work best for me. I just made a stew where the potatoes were 1-1/2 hours in the stew in a low oven, and the potatoes came out perfect. I did peel them, and they still held up. Also, how big are you cutting your potatoes? Too small, and they will disintegrate more easily. I cut mine for stew to about 1" cubes, not smaller.


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

I love russets for almost everything...but for holding their shape in a soup or stew.
I like them for mashing oven roasting, frying, baking and for potato soup where they are meant to fall apart!!


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

I agree, just about any potato holds up better in long-simmering dishes like soups and stews than russets.

A slight aside...when I want to thicken a soup, or am needing to hurry a soup where the potatoes are meant to fall apart, as Linda said, I often grate (finely) a potato into the soup and then add the diced potatoes as well. This way, you get the potato pieces, but still have the thickening. I do this with many 'cream of' soups as well, to cut down the amount of roux I must use (and thus, the calorie/fat content) since I really do like my 'cream of' soups to have a thick texture. I still like to use a roux for the flavor, but I can use less this way.

Another aside...on the same sort of topic, but different, :D

If you have access to chayote squash, it does far better in soups and stewed dishes than zucchini. A similar flavor, but it holds together much better. You do have to peel it though, and it's best to wear gloves as the raw sap can be a problem to skin...not poisonous, but sticky and I think it almost could be used as an exfoliant. Likewise, diced broccoli stems hold together under long simmering than the florets. Use that part of the stem close to the florets without peeling, and the really thick, lower stem can be peeled and diced. This way you get the nice broccoli flavor without as much of that smelly, smushy, overcooked broccoli problem.


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

I was lazy last night and roasted a very small chicken and put some small red potatoes in the pan with the chicken after coating them with a little bit of olive oil, chopped rosemary (my rosemary is still alive in my garden despite the blizzard) salt and pepper. I did poke the potatoes with a fork so they wouldn't explode. I roasted them the whole time with the little chicken.

Man were they good. They held up so well, the texture was creamy but not mushy and I'll tell you they were the best potatoes I've had in a long time.

I know this is off topic. Sorry. I usually use yellow potatoes or Yukon golds in soups, and I don't typically peel them because I like the skins. I have some to cook tomorrow in a Portuguese kale soup.

Winter is here...

seagrass


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

If you're going to really cook a long time, yes the reds are the way to go, but I prefer white and Yukons to red for flavor and texture. I don't like the waxy texture. They're difficult to cook properly IMO, at least to the texture and such that I want. There's no flavor in the skin that there is on russets either. I did use reds one time for lefse but many suggest russets for lefse too. I think I'll try them next time and maybe even Yukes.

And for something that I'll simmer a long time like stew I'll sometimes add them later but I like large chunks of tater in there so I use russets and cut 'em big. Now I'm getting hungry for Amish Stew! :)


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RE: Best potatoes in soup to stay firm

Not really on topic but might be interesting for some :) I have found that I can substitute for potatoes in almost any dish green plantains. I started out trying them in mashed form, like mashed potatoes, and the taste was identical, so that my son who loves smashed potatoes loved those as well. Now I have tried them in soups, salads, hash browns and everywhere they have worked out great this far.


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