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TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

Posted by dcarch (My Page) on
Sun, Nov 27, 11 at 0:56

There have been several threads and many posts about various Turkey making issues.

I decided the last minute to change my TG preparations (no sous vide, LOL) I was originally going to make goose, I changed to make turkey instead to show:

1. It is not difficult to cut a rock hard frozen turkey in half. (please see my video below)

2. It is not difficult to roast half a turkey.

3. It is easy to brown a turkey.

At $0.49 a lb, I invested in two frozen turkeys. Obviously it is not a good idea to thaw and refreeze a turkey, so I used a reciprocating saw and in less than ten minutes, I cut the 18-lb turkey in half.

No one likes a pale anemic looking turkey. Several of you were saying that in a toaster oven, the turkey is not browned very well. You can brown a turkey very easily. Just braise the turkey with a marinate which has two table spoons of dark soy sauce mixed in. The picture shows how nice the turkey looks even BEFORE it is roasted.

How do you make the turkey juicy and moist? Forget about moist meat if you put the turkey in any high temperature. Any meat cooked at 212 F or higher is way overcooked. I put the half turkey, completely frozen, in the oven set at a constant 175 F for 7 hours. Let me tell you, the entire bird was truly tender, moist and juicy, that I don't need to convince you, because no part of the turkey was cooked over 175 F. But what about the skin?

On the same day there was American Test Kitchen showing how to make a "perfect " turkey. I think they were lying. I don't consider a turkey "perfect" that is partly overcooked. They said the skin was crispy, the video clearly shows it wasn't. The skin was very nicely browned, but far from being crispy. Honestly, I have not seen too much truly crispy skin done on a turkey by many people. May be those who deep fry turkeys can.

To make the skin crackling crispy, I took hints from the famous Peking duck method, and the skin came out Peking duck crispy. :-)

The bread was a wild rice bread. Thank you Teresa! It was very good, not according to me. But I think I should have used more wild rice flour. I was not too sure.

No pictures for a few other dishes I made.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone.

dcarch


9 lbs + 9 lbs
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Turkey browned while still frozen
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The Better Half
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Home-Made Persimmon ice cream
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Wild Rice bread
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Mashed potato with chestnuts
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Mashed Satsuma Imo
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Here is a link that might be useful: I saw a turkey


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

I'm a fan of slow roasting, too. These days, I like to cook the turkey at 450 for an hour, then turn the oven down to 250. The meat comes out just as juicy as when I've cooked throughout at 170 or 250. I suspect it's really the oven temperature as the turkey approaches done that effects the moisture inside- a cooler oven causes more even heating. A hotter oven causes lots of evaporation at the surface as you approach the end of the cooking time. It browns beautifully, and you get out of the danger zone quicker (probably not really necessary, from what I've read on bacterial growth during slow roasting, but nice nonetheless). Anyhow, looks like a tasty feast!


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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

Beautiful, as usual.


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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

Thank you unorthodoxepicure.

Jessica, very soon very low termperature cooking will be the most used method for cooking many things. The accuracy of digital temperature control allows cooking right down to the lowest safe temperature, one degree F control accuracy is very easy, comparing with conventional thermostat controls, which can be off by as much as 30 degrees F.

dcarch


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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

Looking dang good! I too like slow roasted, but time can be an issue (and it is more now than ever before for me? Where does the time go?!) these days. I used to turn it on low and slow overnight. That too, is really tasty. And you wake up to wonderful aromas. I didn't know what satsuma imo was. Cool. Japanese yams. Sounds interesting. I have never had a persimmon. Wonder why? Probably don't have them here and I haven't lived where they were offered for many moons, but your ice cream looks divinely creamy. Wild rice bread?! Does it have that same flavor? I'm not "wild" HA! get it? I kill myself, about the texture. I have to really be in the mood for it. I could totally get into bread that tasted like it with a bowl of really good chicken soup, which one? I dunno, but I'd be happy to try several different types, e.g. creamy chicken and vegetable, chicken stew, chicken noodle soup... my mind is full now. May I be excused from the table, please? ;)


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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

Very nice, as usual, Dcarch.
I had to look up the Satsuma Imo.

So I learned something new, again.
That's one of the perks of this forum!

I am curious about your Wild Rice Bread.
Pictures others have posted show wild rice grains in it.
Yours doesn't.
Did you mill the wild rice into flour?
Would you share your recipe?
Thanks!

Rusty


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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

Sorry Rusty, Almost forgot to answer you!

As I said there were other dishes I did not post. There were a few themes for fun for that TG meal:

The 1/2 turkey had gravy made with 1/2 & 1/2, so it was 1/2 & 1/2 & 1/2.


There was also a mashed taro dish with Mashed Satsuma Imo and mashed potato, ---- I called them the three smashed amigos.

The wild rice bread, I thought wild rice could take longer then the bread to cook, so I cooked the rice first and then blended the rice with the flour to make the bread.

dcarch


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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

"Wild rice bread?! Does it have that same flavor?"

:)


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RE: TG It's Over (warning, pix heavy!!!)

Beautiful pictures... and I really need that purple dish..... where did it come from?!


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