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Warning about knife--Ouch!

Posted by kitchendetective (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 8, 13 at 14:39

Most will not need this warning, but, after cutting myself three times (yes, you'd think I would have learned), I thought I should pass this on. I have had this 7" knife for years and years, and have never cut myself before this spate.

Note where the back of the blade meets the cutting edge. I recently sent the knife off to Murray Carter, who provides quick and fabulous sharpening and repair services. He thinned the blade for me and got it sharper than anything I have ever achieved on my own. However, in the course of picking up the knife, before applying my usual grip, I have cut myself on that back corner. I didn't even feel the wound, but noticed the bleeding. If any of your knives have similar architecture, beware! Willing to confess to klutziness in the hopes of sparing injury.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

Which part of the knife are you talking about?

dcarch

Here is a link that might be useful: knife parts


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

She means the corner of the heel of the blade.


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

That's happened to me as well with my Japanese knives. DH to the rescue! He softened the edge with one of his tools- thankfully he's pretty helpful!


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

Western chef knife and Japanese slicer are held differently.

You don't choke up on a Japanese knife, so the sharp heel is okay for those.

On a western chef knife , people often choke up (pinch heel of blade between forefinger and thumb) so the corner is a risk.


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

That is providing you know how to hold a knife properly. No training here I'm a grab and go girl. Time to get a kevlar glove. I'd cut myself on a sharp corner too not that I would need a corner to cut myself that happens naturally.


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

Also good to keep your knives consistently sharp yourself so it always performs the same.
Letting them get dull, them having them sharpened, will cut rough one day, then easily another day after a good sharpening. A recipe for blood.


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

kitchendetective, I am not sure why they sharpened that edge. Yes, even at 90 degrees, it can be razor sharp. The fact that you didn't feel it cut into you means it is that sharp.

Many good knife steels are very hard even a file cannot work well. You will need a grinding stone (Dremel rotary tool) to round off the sharp edges.

Temporarily, you can put a piece of duct tape over it.

dcarch


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

dcarch, I am not seeing an advantage to the sharpened point on the ninety degree angle, either. I do like the blade architecture, though, as it facilitates access to the stones along the full length of the blade. I sent it in due to a damaged tip, so this was much more than a sharpening task. It was a regrinding task. I am so impressed with the promptness and skill, but I am still planning to reappropriate my Dremel from the depths of DH's shop, in order to blunt that heel return a tiny bit. Again, these wounds were not acquired while actually cutting, but while picking up the knife, before gripping it for cutting.


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

I, also, don't think there is any functional reason to have the corner of the heel so sharp.

I would knock down that corner very gently. An edge is a very fine, delicate thing. A Dremel is overkill, like bringing a gas torch to light the birthday candles.

The rough ring on the bottom of a ceramic bowl, mug, or plate works okay. In fact, when you are in a rental cabin with dull knives, you can use those surfaces as a makeshift sharpening stone.

This post was edited by johnliu on Fri, Oct 11, 13 at 18:33


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

This is really tough metal. I'll try it on a stone first, and will report back.


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

Another good way if you have silicone carbide (wet/dry) sandpaper, wrap the sandpaper on a stick and use it like a file.

Aluminum oxide sandpaper can work also, but much slower.

dcarch


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

Well, since we're exploring options, what grit?


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RE: Warning about knife--Ouch!

"-----Well, since we're exploring options, what grit?---"

Get a few from coarse (400 G) to fine grit (2000 G). Cut them to smaller sheets. They work extremely well as fast sharpening stones and take no room to store in your drawer. You can buy combo packs which may have all the grits you need.

First you get a cheap knife and try to rub on the surface a few of you finer grit sandpapers to see what polish you get to match that on you good knife.

You can use the coarse papers to "file" down the sharp edges, then polish up with the fine grit paper.

dcarch


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