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Huitlacoche

Posted by greginnd (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 3, 12 at 10:32

Does anyone know how to prepare it? I have a lot this year in the garden and thought about trying it.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Huitlacoche

I had to Google it to find out what it is. Corn Smut, but also know as Mexican Truffle. It's one of the foods labeled as a super food. Being raised on a farm, I've seen plenty of it but have to say I didn't know you could eat it.

My search turned up plenty of recipes, it's used quite a bit in Mexican cooking.

Nancy


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RE: Huitlacoche

Just sautee in butter ...
You sure must have had a lot more rain fall than we have!!


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RE: Huitlacoche

Just sautee in butter ...
You sure must have had a lot more rain fall than we have!!


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RE: Huitlacoche

The only time I ever heard of it was when it was an ingredient om the Foof Network show Chopped.


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RE: Huitlacoche

The only time I ever heard of it was when it was an ingredient om the Foof Network show Chopped.


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RE: Huitlacoche

I've had it many times in Mexico City, but I've only prepared it one way at home, which is in quesadillas. To make the quesadillas, it is best to use fresh masa, but you can use dried masa and reconstitute it with water. Then make a small ball (about 2" diameter) and flatten it out with a tortilla press or rolling pin, or just flatten it between your hands. Add chopped huitlacoche and cheese of choice (Munster, Monterey Jack, Fontina, or other semi-soft melting cheese), fold over the masa and seal, as you would when making ravioli. Deep fry at 375 degrees until golden brown, drain, and serve immediately.

I've had fancier dishes in chic restaurants in Mexico City, but I do not remember the details. The quesadillas are street food that I would buy from street vendors. I used to stay in an apartment in Colonial Condesa that was across the street from a bakery/deli, and there was a woman who made quesadillas in front of the bakery. The same woman was there every day, and hers were the best.

Lars

Here is a link that might be useful: Huitlacoche recipes from Mexconnect


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RE: Huitlacoche

Lars,

Thanks. The quesadillas sound really good. I was looking at some recipes but yours sounds really good.

I've never had huitlacoche before but I thought I would try it. Maybe I can come up with a unique recipe to use it in.


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