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Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

Posted by MellowD (My Page) on
Sat, Jul 26, 14 at 9:19

I was given a gallon Ziploc back of fresh figs.... my first impulse was YAY... then the harsh reality of 'what in the heck do you make with fresh figs?' hit me. Then I thought I have NO IDEA what they taste like other than in Fig Newtons... I've never made jams or preserves and I'm not excited about buying a bunch of jars and supplies... HELP and thanks!

Melody


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

I really like this fig pie recipe. I make it as given on the linked page, with a whole wheat crust.

Fresh figs are also great in any hot dish you'd make with dried fruit--they go well with meats and chicken. They're great as wedges on a cold plate with salad veg and cheese. You can stuff and roast them (any kind of paste filling would do, nut and cheese would be my choice)--cut around the pip, create an opening inside with your knife, pipe in the filling, and roast with a little glaze of some kind. Make a savory pie with figs, mushrooms, cheese, dark meat poultry, and herbs.

They're also good as is, or cut open vertically (pip and end removed) and squished on crunchy toast.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

Personally, I don't much care for Fig Newtons,
Or jam or preserves.
So the idea of using them in anythng cooked is
pretty off putting, to me.
And a gallon ziplock bag really isn't that many figs.
I would simply eat them as I would many other fruits,
Simply as a snack, out of hand.
Delicious!
Before I moved to Texas many many years ago,
I had only ever had them dried,
(Purchased in a container)
They are good that way, too,
If you find you don't care that much for them fresh,
And don't want to invest in jars, etc, for preserving.
I am no help as far as instructions as to how to dry them,
But I'm sure someone here will be able to
Give you instructions if you are interested.

Enjoy your bounty!

Rusty


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

I make fig jam, low sugar fig jam, preserved figs (whole), fig chutney, and, figs and wine chutney. I also dehydrate them which condenses their sweet flavor and keeps for months in the refrigerator. For fresh eating I drizzle some honey over and serve with goat cheese or brie or a strong white cheddar, or make a fig smoothie, or bake them in cake like you would a date nut tea bread. I have 12 fig trees so I eat a lot of them fresh (and eating too many - like 10 at once - acts like a mild laxative so be careful). I also freeze them (wash, air dry, cut off stems, cut into 4 pieces, bag them up and freeze for middle of winter treat). Figs are in the top 5 of the sweetest fruit on the planet with about a 20% level of natural sugar and with an unusually low pH compared to other fruit.
Love my figs - they taste nothing at all like the weird stuff in fig newtons.
Nancy


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

You can grill fig halves; no need to add anything except a spritz of Pam. Excellent with pork or chicken.

I smash up some cream cheese with a dash of sherry and 1/2 tsp of powdered sugar. Cut the figs in half and smear a dollop of the cream cheese on top. Super easy and amazingly delicious.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

We have several varieties of fig trees. They are not all created equal. Some are delicious fresh and some are insipid.

Since you have so many, I'm with the previous poster. Grill them.

They can be wrapped in bacon, stuffed with goat cheese, rosemary and nuts....

Many ways to deal with this fruit. IT WILL NOT KEEP FRESH!

You don't know how lucky you are to actually have fresh ones. Eat a few fresh. Slice them into salads. But cook the rest one way or another. You could even microwave them so they won't rot till you decide which recipe in which to use them.

We had a whole platter of fresh figs this morning, fresh from our many fig trees. Simple. Just cut them in half. The variety was Verte. A green fig with a strawberry red interior and a taste of strawberry jam.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

My figs almost don't make it into the house before I eat them. Any fresh, off-the-tree fruit is always the best, but a fresh fig is heaven.

I just may have to try stuffing one to see how much better they can be ... if that's even possible.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

I love fresh figs. Once I discovered fresh figs, I understood what made a fig delicious! The suggestion from this article for pork chops with roasted figs will be on my menu this week!
Enjoy!

Here is a link that might be useful: Los Angeles Times Daily Dish 7/26/14


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

Gorgeous if you open them up by cutting a cross in the middle, serve on a platter draped with jambon cru and a honey vinaigrette, or has been said, wrap a slice of jambon cru around the fid and put a spoonful of goat's cheese in the middle and bake 5 minutes.
Eat them fresh! Lovely!


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

Cut them in half or quarters and wrap in proscuitto. Yum!


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

I've never had a good fresh fig, we aren't "fig country" here. I've purchased figs at the grocery and have not been impressed, so if I go somewhere that figs grow, I'm trying one!

I love Fig Newtons and Mustang's salad with figs, but Evil Jessica's Fig and Vanilla Bean preserves were so good I ate them with a spoon and didn't share.

Annie


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

I've never had the problem of too many figs; they just seem to disappear.

Of course, if you are despondent, you can do what (according to Shakespeare) Cleopatra did: smuggle in to your bedchamber an asp, hidden in a basket of figs.

Her last words were, "How'd you like to bite, my asp?"

Sorry.....BTW there is no historical evidence that Cleo really did that. Dramatic invention.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

We eat them fresh, of course, but for preserving, I make Chipotle Fig jam. I use a recipe similar to this one.....

Chipotle Fig Jam
Yields 4 half pints

2 lbs figs, chopped
2 cups sugar
1 cup water
4 tablespoons lemon juice, plus a few lemon slices if desired
1-1½ canned chipotle chiles in adobo sauce, chopped �" to taste, depending on your desired spice level

Chop your figs according to how chunky you want your jam, and place in a large non-reactive pot. Cover with sugar and let macerate for 30 minutes to an hour.

Add water, lemon juice, and lemon slices if using, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce to a simmer and stir regularly to prevent scorching.

After an hour, if needed, use a potato masher to break up the figs. Stir in the chopped chipotle chile in adobo sauce.

Cook another 15-20 minutes, or until the jam has reached a consistency you like.

Ladle into hot jars, and process in a water bath canner for 10 minutes.

I have processed them in boiling water but usually make "freezer" jam.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

If you have an ice-cream maker, you can make fig sorbet. Yum! Just use any fruit sorbet recipe with the figs.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

so, how do I know, my figs are ready to harvest?

First time figs on my tree.

Moni


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

When they are ripe they bend/drop-down where the stem and fruit meet and are really wiggly.


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Annie 1992

OK, so I searched the forum for Evil Jessica's Fig and Vanilla Bean preserves and can't find such a recipe. Do you (or anyone) have this recipe? I have the feeling that one of these days I'm going to have a lot of figs all ripe at the same time.


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RE: Fresh Figs and what to do with them.

This might not be it, but there's a whole thread in Harvest about canning vanilla fig preserves. And here's another that might be it, which is a repost of "Mes Confitures by Christine Ferber " that says it's from Jessica in Cooking--scroll down to the second post.


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