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Carnation Milk question

Posted by netla (My Page) on
Sun, Apr 26, 09 at 12:58

Someone I know told me that she loved coffee with Carnation Milk, so naturally I had to try it. I went out and bought a can at the neighbourhood Asian Market, and upon opening it encountered a thick, custardy, yellowish, syrupy concoction, cloyingly sweet with a vague dairy flavour. I tried it in coffee, and ugh! Even powdered dairy creamer tastes better. However, the can cost the equivalent of 5 liters of milk, and I would hate to throw it out without at least trying to use it. Any ideas on how to make it palatable? I assume some kind of dessert could be make out of it?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Carnation Milk question

Netla, it sounds as if someone sold you sweetened condensed milk which is a totally different thing. I sure wouldn't want it in my coffee either. You usually make desserts with it. We don't get it here at an Asian market. It's in our regular grocery stores and so is Carnation Evaporated Milk which is probably what she was talking about. Here is where you can go to get all types of recipes using the sweetened condensed milk. This is just a different brand.

Here is a link that might be useful: Sweetened Condensed Milk


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Yes, you got condensed milk instead of evaporated milk. Carnation makes both types. You are in luck however. Right now we have a very good recipe on the board that uses it. Check out the Retro Dessert thread. What size can did you get that was as expensive as 5 liters of milk? You'll just need to check out the size when you make the recipes. There are some super easy recipes for no bake lemon/lime pies that use the condensed milk.


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Here's a recipe for Cherry Cream Crunch, which uses sweetened condensed milk. It's an old recipe, which calls for a 15 oz can of condensed milk. If you use a smaller size can, you can add a bit of cream cheese to make up for the loss of volume, but you might want to add a bit of sugar to it to make up for the loss of sweetness, although this recipe is already fairly sweet. I also make lime pie using sweetened condensed milk.

Lars


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Recipe

Cherry Cream Crunch
Cherry pie filling:*
2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup sugar
2 cups fresh pitted cherries
2 tablespoons cornstarch

Crust:
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/3 cup brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup sifted all purpose flour
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1 cup flaked or shredded coconut, unsweetened
1 cup granola (or oatmeal or rice flakes**)
1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Lemon filling:
2 eggs, slightly beaten
1 can (15 oz.) sweetened condensed milk
1 tbsp grated lemon rind
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
1/8 tsp salt

Cherry pie filling:
Combine sugar and lemon juice in a bowl, stir, add cherries, and let sit for at least 6 hours, stirring occasionally. Drain off and reserve cherry syrup.

Combine a small amount of syrup to cornstarch to make a paste, then stir cornstarch paste back into syrup. Pour mixture into a saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring, until the sauce thickens. Stir in the drained cherries. Cool before using.

Crust:
Cream butter in a large mixing bowl; gradually add brown sugar and vanilla. Mix well. Sift flour, salt and cinnamon; add to butter mixture. Stir in coconut, granola, and walnuts. Press 2-1/2 cups of crumb mixture into bottom of ungreased 9x13 inch baking dish. Bake at 375 degrees for 12 minutes.

Lemon filling:
Prepare the lemon filling by combining the slightly beaten eggs, sweetened condensed milk, grated lemon rind, fresh lemon juice and salt. Stir until mixture thickens. Remove crust from the oven and spread with lemon filling. Spoon the cherry pie filling over the lemon filling and then sprinkle with the remaining crumb mixture. Return to oven and bake at 375 degrees 15 to 18 minutes or until delicately browned. Chill before serving. May be served topped with whipped cream. Serves 9 to 12.

*You can substitute 1 can (1 lb 4 oz.) of canned cherry pie filling
**If using oatmeal or rice flakes instead of granola, increase brown sugar to 1/2 cup.


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Beverlyal, yep, that's exactly what happened. The only thing on the can that is in a language I understand is "Carnation Milk", the weight and the expiration date, so the mistake was inevitable.

Coconut-nj, the can is the second smallest size - I don't know how many oz. but it's 388 grams. It's so expensive because it is not a staple, it is imported only in small shipments and is only available in specialty stores like the Asian Market. This particular can came from Thailand, so it's unsurprising that it should be so expensive.


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by the way...

... the retro recipe looks good, and I have all the ingredients on hand!

*leaves the computer to go do some baking*


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Instead of looking for brand names, it's better to look for a product!

Here in Australia, Carnation makes all sorts of milk products - sweetened condensed, evaporated, flavoured, cream, coconut milk etc. Your coffee could have been worse - Carnation also makes Caramel Pie Filling!!

You were looking for evaporated milk, which is simply milk which has had some of its water content removed. Here in Australia, we use it wherever a recipe calls for Half and Half, which we don't get here. It can also be beaten to make something akin to whipped cream, and it used a lot in dairy-type desserts, as a richer, creamier alternative to plain milk.

Try again! Look for 'evaporated milk', and it can be any brand.


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RE: Carnation Milk question

I love sweetened condensed milk in espresso...or even in just very strong coffee....with just a wee drap of spirits!
Linda C


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Yup Linda, that combo is very popular here in Canarias and it's called 'cafe cortado leche leche', meaning it's an espresso cut with a little foamed milk with a dollop of sweetened condensed milk in the bottom of the cup. (Two milks ....leche leche). It's very additive and I was hooked on it for a while but had to stop when I started cutting down on sugar. Some people stir their cup so it's all mixed together, but I like to drink it slowly and when I get to the bottom, 'drink' the sweet mixture with a spoon.

If you add a bit of Tia Maria or rum in there with a piece of lemon peel, and a dash of cinnamon, it's called a barraquito.

SharonCb


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Daisy, I'm curious as to why you don't get half and half in Australia? I know you all have a large enough dairy industry to provide it.


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RE: Carnation Milk question

We don't get half and half here in Spain either although we get a lot of other European and local milk products. Nobody has heard of it.
If I need it I buy whipping cream and dilute it with milk.

SharonCb


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RE: Carnation Milk question

netla, if it helps, I like sweetened condensed milk right out of the can, LOL.

I also have a recipe that calls for a can of sweetened condensed milk and a bag of chocolate chips, it makes an extremely sweet chocolate fudge.

Annie


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Yep, and if you Google "home made sweetened condensed milk" you'll get a recipe for it. The ingredients are boiling water, nonfat dry milk, sugar and margarine, though I'd use real butter, processed in a blender.

No wonder it's so expensive, look at how much milk is in it. Hey! That makes it good for you, RIGHT?? LOL


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RE: Carnation Milk question

I use the condensed milk when making Irish Creme. Mine tastes as good a B's.


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Sweetened condensed milk makes a good key lime pie. I also use it for a quick fudge.


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Good thread, all - thanks!


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Vietnamese coffee is made by pouring boiling water over grounds which are in a kind of metal strainer cup, which is placed over a coffee cup containing a dollop of Condensed milk. Mmmmm!
I wouldn't use evaporated milk instead of half and half (which we don't have here either, no recipes call for it), I'd use...half milk and half cream.


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RE: Carnation Milk question

Sweetened condensed milk also makes a good flan :) And in Panama, we used to eat it poured over shaved ice.


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