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Speaking of pineapple...

Posted by kathleenca (My Page) on
Sun, Mar 17, 13 at 21:28

A friend sent me this in an email - I thought pineapple was just good, but it's also good for you. Kathleen

The pineapple is a member of the bromeliad family.
It is extremely rare that bromeliads produce edible fruit. The pineapple is the only available edible bromeliad today.

It is a multiple fruit. One pineapple is actually made up of dozens of individual floweret's that grow together to form the entire fruit. Each scale on a pineapple is evidence of a separate flower.

Pineapples stop ripening the minute they are picked.
No special way of storing them will help ripen them further.

Colour is relatively unimportant in determining ripeness.
Choose your pineapple by smell.If it smells fresh, tropical and sweet, it will be a good fruit.

The more scales on the pineapple, the sweeter and juicier the taste.

After you cut off the top, you can plant it. It should grow much like a sweet potato will.

This delicious fruit is not only sweet and tropical; it also offers many benefits to our health. Pineapple is a remarkable fruit.

We find it enjoyable because of its lush, sweet and exotic flavor, but it may also be one of the most healthful foods available today. If we take a more detailed look at it, we will find that pineapple is valuable for easing indigestion, arthritis or sinusitis.

The juice has an anthelmintic effect; it helps get rid of intestinal worms.

Let's look at how pineapple affects other conditions.

Pineapple is high in manganese, a mineral that is critical to development of strong bones and connective tissue. A cup of fresh pineapple will give you nearly 75% of the recommended daily amount. It is particularly helpful to older adults, whose bones tend to become brittle with age.

Bromelain, a proteolytic enzyme, is the key to pineapple's value. Proteolytic means "breaks down protein", which is why pineapple is known to be a digestive aid. It helps the body digest proteins more efficiently. Bromelain is also considered an effective anti-inflammatory.

Regular ingestion of at least one half cup of fresh pineapple daily is purported to relieve painful joints common to osteoarthritis. It also produces mild pain relief.

In Germany, bromelain is approved as a post-injury medication because it is thought to reduce inflammation and swelling.

Orange juice is a popular liquid for those suffering from a cold because it is high in Vitamin C. Fresh pineapple is not only high in this vitamin, but because of the Bromelain, it has the ability to reduce mucous in the throat.
If you have a cold with a productive cough, add pineapple to your diet. It is commonly used in Europe as a post-operative measure to cut mucous after certain sinus and throat operations.

Those individuals who eat fresh pineapple daily report fewer sinus problems related to allergies. In and of itself, pineapple has a very low risk for allergies.

Pineapple is also known to discourage blood clot development. This makes it a valuable dietary addition for frequent fliers and others who may be at risk for blood clots.

An old folk remedy for morning sickness is fresh pineapple juice. it really works! Fresh juice and some nuts first thing in the morning often make a difference.

It's also good for a healthier mouth. The fresh juice discourages plaque growth.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Kathleen, pineapple is very healthy, and I didn't know about the manganese, so thanks.

I don't know about the healthier mouth, though. Pineapple makes my mouth sore, as does pomegranate and kiwi. It goes away in a couple of hours, but makes it sore enough that I don't want to eat anything.

Amanda says it does the same thing to her, but the canned stuff doesn't, just the fresh pineapple.

Hey, does that make it a diet aid?

Annie


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Interesting info Kathleen. Thanks. Christy loves pineapple. There is a Canning Homemade blog/site that I like. I follow her on Facebook. The other day she posted about canning pineapple. Since pineapple has so much acid you can just can it with water or use any strength syrup you like. A simple 15 minute water bath and you're done. Everyone that tried doing it said the flavor was so much better than commercial canned pineapple. I'm wondering if doing it that way might let you eat it easier/better/more Annie. I guess it's the enzymes that affect you so maybe a little canning might help. I'm out of half pint jars right now, but did order some. I might do some half pints next time Christy gets a pineapple, since that way she wouldn't have to eat it every day for a week to use it up. She picked one up yesterday. Maybe when I clean it tomorrow I'll can one pint just to see.

Off topic......Btw, this woman does canning gauge testing for a small $5 fee which she uses towards return postage. I sent her mine recently and she showed the pic, I need to add 1 lb pressure for this year. I'm ready to can a bunch of broth so wanted to make sure since none of the extension services around here do it any more. She's pretty great about making sure recipes are safe since she gets lots of new canners. It cost me more than the $5 to send the gauge to her. Told her she should raise the fee, but she just wants people to be safe and eats the extra dollar postage.

Here is a link that might be useful: Canning blog


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Thanks, Coconut. I can't imagine actually canning pineapple but if I ever find a good buy here in Michigan, well, you never know.

Makayla had some French Toast at a local restaurant with a pineapple topping and she loved it, so maybe.....

Annie


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

LOL Annie, I'm starting to change my attitude that I have to can a big batch of something to make it worthwhile. Bet you could can one pint or quart in that asparagus cooker. Smiles.


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

I've had pineapple juice recommended for singers who have colds, it's supposed to be good for the voice/vocal cords.


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Pineapples are also one of the favorite foods of racoons. Hard to raise them here because the racoons will eat them as soon as the pineapples start to emit that wonderful smell.

This post was edited by beachlily on Mon, Mar 18, 13 at 7:06


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

I've gotten good pineapples very cheap at Aldi. Sometimes they have them (or had them, haven't been there lately) for 99 cents.


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Pineapple (fresh) is a very effective meat tenderizer.

It can literally turn the toughest meat into mush if you are not careful.

dcarch


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Coconut, you're right, I'm always in the mind set that I have to have a canner full or it's not worthwhile, LOL.

I think I'm going to make some sweet and sour chicken with the pineapple.

Raccoons like pineapple? Go figure, they're horrible destructive pests, wouldn't you know they'd be attracted by pineapples. Other fresh fruit too, I'll bet.

Annie


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

If you strain your muscles during weight lifting, fresh pineapple will help alleviate the pain, and the fresher the pineapple, the better. After the pineapple has been cut, its healing properties in this respect start to diminish a bit.

I have a pineapple bromeliad in my back yard (along with many other bromeliads), and I am hoping it will bloom and make a pineapple next year. I've seen blooming pineapple bromeliads in nurseries here, but they are expensive, and so I bought one that was not in bloom yet. They are very cute when they bloom, although not as showy as other bromeliads that I have, many of which are blooming now.

Lars


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

I've always found pineapple special. As a child I couldn't eat it because it aggravated my eczema. Citrus and raw tomatoes were also off limits. So when I outgrew the eczema, all three were great treats. We used to cut the top off the pineapple, then eat the fruit with a spoon, digging around the core.

When you see pineapples growing in the field, they are very impressive. The whole bush is spiny with huge spiky leaves, much like the top, only much more dangerous looking.

Cheryl


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Well, I had planned to make a Hawaiian type chicken for supper using up the pineapple and cooking it, thus alleviating my problems with eating it fresh.

Elery, however, had other ideas, so we're having salmon patties and tomorrow we're going to his house. If it's still good when we get back, I'll try to use it then.

Annie


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

CC, you mentioned the deal on pineapples...99 cents. I will never forget purchasing a pineapple in Hawaii. Our hotel overlooked pineapple fields for as far as you could see. After waking up to this view every morning, we had to have a pineapple. We went to the market and were shocked to see the most expensive pineapples I had ever seen!! We never forgot how ironic this was.


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

I am not at all sure why they say a pineapple doesn't ripen after it is picked. I guess you could say it "rots" into sweetness. I have been buying an almost ripe and far from ripe pineapple every week for years. They stay on the counter till they are fragrant..and then I put them in the fridge. They will consolidate their sugar over the next 2-3 days as they essentially dehydrate in the cold temps. You will never eat a sweeter pineapple if you do this. I always have one ready to eat with this system. c


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

"---I am not at all sure why they say a pineapple doesn't ripen after it is picked.---"

I am very surprised also.

I have had lot's pf pineapples. With green pineapples, I just let them sit on the window sill until they start to give out incredible fragrance, then they will be sugar sweet.

dcarch


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

haha dc...my son the chef says once anything is harvested the ripening stops...it is only rotting LOL...he is technical to a fault ! As long as it tastes good that is all I care about. Try the fridge concentration of sugar...you will never do it any other way. After 3-4 days it is so sweet your teeth will ache :) c


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

I love pineapples, they are very healthy. I've also read that they can help to burn fat as when you eat a pineapple, it takes more calories to digest it than he pinepple itself contains. But I think its just a myth unfortunately) here is some information about calories in a whole pineapple.

This post was edited by Stellawud on Wed, Oct 9, 13 at 15:28


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

Pineapple is a first cousin to the plant from which meat tenderizer is made. It has the same enzyme qualities--if you eat fresh pineapple in a large enough quantity, it WILL 'tenderize' your mouth and digestive track. But like with meat tenderizer, that action is stopped by adequate cooking. That's why several of you said you can eat canned (which is heat-treated, of course) but not fresh pineapple.

The enzyme action that breaks down protein is also the reason why you cannot use fresh pineapple in Jello--gelatine being an animal protein, it will never set up if you stir in some fresh pineapple.

I love fresh pineapple, but eat it sparingling, because I really don't want the damage it can do in large quantities. I'm surprised that that article recommends such large daily amounts, especially for seniors. Pineapple is a delicious fruit, but it IS possible to get too much of a good thing with it. Also, growing a pineapple from a pineapple top is a bit more involved--you have to dry the top, then trim it a certain way, etc. Not just pop it in a pot of dirt.


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

This relish recipe is really easy and delicious.
Ingredients

2 tbsp sunflower oil
3 red onions, finely chopped
1 tbsp yellow mustard seeds
1 tbsp black onion seeds (kalonji or nigella)
1 tsp turmeric
2 pineapples peeled, cored and chopped into small chunks
1 red chilli, deseeded and finely chopped
thumb-sized piece ginger, finely chopped
250g soft light brown sugar
175ml cider vinegar

Method

Heat the oil in a large heavy-based pan. Tip in the onions and spices and cook for 5 mins until fragrant. add the rest of the ingredients plus 1 tsp salt and simmer for 1 hr until dark golden and thick. Pour into sterilised jars and allow to cool before covering.
Recipe from Good Food magazine, November 2011


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

I love fresh pineapple,
And I would eat it even if I didn't like it,
Because it really does work wonders on Arthritis pain!
In fact, I try to have fresh pineapple with a dollop of
Greek yoghurt (plain, non-fat)
For breakfast every day.
And my joints really speak of the difference
when I don't have it.
I guess I am fortunate that it doesn't cause
any mouth or digestive problems for me.
Back when I was a kid,
tomatoes made my mouth sore,
so my mother always planted a few yellow tomatoes for me.
They didn't bother me at all.
As a young adult,
(and as a middle-aged one, too)
I very rarely ate tomatoes.
But since I've entered my "golden" (aka "rusty") years,
I no longer have the problem with the sore mouth.
Guess I "out-grew" whatever caused it.

With all due respect, though,
I have to say that in my opinion a 1/2 C serving
of fresh pineapple is hardly a "large" amount!
A half cup of pineapple chunks is not much at all!

Rusty



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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

When I was in Hawaii, they have two kinds of pineapples.

The regular kind and a smaller round kind. They call that Low acid pineapple. Very sweet and never sour.

I have never seen it here in NY area.

dcarch


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

My pineapple plant has a good sized pineapple on it now, but it is still growing and nowhere close to being ripe. I bought two other pineapple plants from Trader Joe's, and they already had pineapples on them, but they were the small round type, and I have already harvested them. They did stay in my yard for about three months, however. Unfortunately, they weren't any better than pineapples I have bought in the store. I am hoping that my larger pineapple will be better. I bought that plant at a nursery.

The old pineapple plants are now putting out side shoots, and so I will keep them and see if they make more pineapples. Even the large pineapple plant is putting out a side shoot, which I was not expecting.

Here's a picture with two of the pineapple plants - the one that is now large has a very small pineapple on it and is hard to see.

Lars


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RE: Speaking of pineapple...

I have significant acid reflux, but I can and do eat pineapples. Hubs just shakes his head, because he knows I won't eat anything that hurts me. I love it! Can't eat citrus, it's like poison to me and I live in Central FL with a meyers lemon in my backyard. I'm increasing my intake of pineapple, with the thought that my arthritis will take a hike. Using my bicycle on the beach has helped the arthritis a lot, too.


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