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Silly ? What's the difference between

Posted by triciae (My Page) on
Wed, Mar 13, 13 at 18:13

a fry pan and a skillet?

I've always used the terms interchangeably but not LC. Is a CI piece a "skillet" and any other metal a "fry pan"? If so, who knew?? Not I.

/tricia

This post was edited by triciae on Wed, Mar 13, 13 at 18:38


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

$ :-)

If they call it a Frying pan, it costs more.

dcarch


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Here in Canada, we use frying pans. I never met a skillet while growing up.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

I'm pretty sure the names are for the same piece of equipment.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Umm....you wack a burgler with a skillet and cook in a frying pan??? Maybe it is a regional thing?

And is a saute pan the same as a skillet/frying pan?


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

I think they're the same. A sauté pan has straight sides.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Le Creuset lists them separate so, as normal, I got confused. :)

/t

Here is a link that might be useful: Fry Pans, Saute Pans, & Skillets from LC


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

I always thought a cast iron was the skillet and other metals were the frying pan. Skillet, as a word, denotes a hefty, weighty pan to me. Fry pans are lighter, more user friendly. NancyLouise


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

I agree with Nancy Louise - a skillet is cast iron and heavy, and a frying pan is lighter and can be steel or aluminum. I've never heard of a steel or aluminum skillet, and I've never heard of a cast iron frying pan, although perhaps others have, since they say the terms are interchangeable. It could be regional. And FOAS is right - a sauté pan has straight sides.

Lars


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Hmmm, I shall have to correct my vocab.

I have always willy-nilly used both terms. :(

/t


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Not me...it's a cast iron fry pan , a non stick fry pan, a stainless steel fry pan..

to me a skillet is a long flat frying surface designed to cook larger quantities than would fit in a fry pan.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

In British English, a skillet is a long-handled saucepan, but I do not think that is relevant here.

The meaning definitely varies regionally, as I suspected. What Sharon described as I skillet I call a griddle.

There are similar confusions with spatula and pancake turner.

Lars


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Yes, I would call that a griddle also, Lars. Or, if large enough I would call it a flat top.

/t


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

I grew up with cast iron frying pans, stainless steel frying pans, etc.

Skillet was Bubba, LeRoy, Grady, and Fred Sanford's buddy.

But then, I grew up knowing a particular sandwich to be called a "submarine" or "sub" for short, where I've been told it's called a hero, grinder, gyro, po-boy and more.

To say nothing of the "green onion" I grew up with, elsewhere called spring onion, scallion, shallot...

And I would get a drink at a drinking fountain, not a bubbler.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Now that I think of it I probably call it a griddle too......so I guess I don't call anything a skillet.....but I do have an amazing flat top with my new BBQ.....also known as a grill ;)


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

They're usually all frying pans to me, although I sometimes call my largest cast iron frying pan a skillet.

I never thought there was any difference other than marketing.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Frying pans are deeper. Skillets are shallow to saute. That is what I learned in the South.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

"Skillets are shallow to saute."
Saute skillet? That's a new one on me! :)


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

Yep, I agree with pretty.gurl. Through the years that I've researched on cookwares, I've learned the same thing. Frying pan is deeper to hold a large amount of oil for deep frying. Skillet and Sautee pans are pretty much the same. They're mostly used for pan frying (using very little oil for frying) and sautee food.


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

I always thought the difference was a skillet has a lid and a frying pan does not.

~Ann


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

I always thought it just depended on how you felt that day, I've called them frying pans and skillets interchangeably.

And, like cynic, I get a drink at the water fountain, I buy a sub or submarine sandwich and I use green onions.

I might actually have a sauté pan but I don't really know, I just grab whatever is the right size and might be in the front of my cupboard. Or is that a cabinet?

Annie


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RE: Silly ? What's the difference between

The word skillet makes me think of Denny's ( a place I have been only once in the last 20 years) or other marginally fast food restaurants that advertise "skillet" dinners.

At my house, I usually categorize pans by their materiel rather than the shape, as that is the deciding factor in how and what I cook in it. I have sauteed in a stock pot and boiled in a frying pan....and chocolate is always melted in a frying pan.

But I never mentally use the word skillet. It's always frying pan.
However, most "real" frying occurs in the Fry Daddy - which could be any brand of deep fryer. It's still a Daddy.


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