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Butter vs Irish butter

Posted by donnar57 (My Page) on
Sun, Mar 6, 11 at 16:37

Despite my arguing, my husband bought a 1/2 lb chunk of Irish butter.

What's the different between Irish butter and plain old ordinary salted butter from the US?

PS He shouldn't be eating either one, but I can't argue with him.


Donna


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

I believe it has a higher butterfat content and the higher the better for most things. I splurge on Plugra butter which is a European style butter made here in the US.

Nancy


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

Heartburn forced me to give up butter on sandwiches, toast, anything. And hate mayo in a cold roast beef sandwich!

A discussion here about different butter-making processes convinced me to try Irish butter. Happy Days are here. No heartburn!!

If someone is not suffering as I was, and cannot detect a flavor difference, I wouldn't pay the extra.


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

It's goooood!!
I have a friend who "likes butter". One time he gathered about 5 kinds of butter...no maybe 6. There was Kerrygold, Pelugra, another French brand, the butter from the Amish market and plain ole supermarket butter. We rated the odd and expensive French brand best.....with the Amish brand a very close second.
Yes....there is a huge difference in butters. You won't notice it for things like sauteeing onions but for a spread on fresh French bread, expensive is lots better.
Linda C


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

Ditto Linda! Us too. We love the french butter too much! LOL! I find that Land O Lakes supermarket butter compared to French or Irish butter is a hands down winner.


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

So Linda, was the Pelugra the odd and expensive French brand, or was it the other one that you didn't give a name for? (I get confused easily sometimes.)

Sally


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

Sally,

Plugra (not Pelugra) is made by Keller's Creamery right here in the US. It is not a French butter. Plugra is 82% butterfat versus the 80% of many other brands. So, it has a bit less water. It's great stuff for flakey pastries and also for sauces. I used to use it quite a bit but we switched to organic dairy a few years back & Plugra's not organic. :(

/tricia


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

No the un named French brand ( I forget the name) tasted best.


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

About 25 years ago I lived for a few months in Haiti. Couldn't get any fresh milk or many other items I was used to, but butter from Normandy was available. (I suppose it was because there was a weekly round trip flight from Port-au-Prince to Paris, and the market could import it just as easily from France as it could from any other country.) It was exquisite.

According to Wikipedia, in Europe they make butter from cream that is pasteurized then fermented with special lactobacilli; in the US, butter is made from pasteurized non-fermented butter. That probably accounts for some of the difference in flavor.

Here is a link that might be useful: butter


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

Try making your own!

Here is a link that might be useful: make your own!


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

The American equivalent is probably sour cream butter instead of the typical store butter which is made from sweet cream.

In the old days the milk and cream was simply left to sour a bit before it was churned.

It has a very rich and complex taste that store butter just doesn't have.


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

I gather, from what you all are saying, is that it should be used for buttering bread, rather than used in baking - correct? If it has a slightly different butterfat ratio and different taste, it could change the cookie recipe, right?


Donna


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

Thanks, Tricia and Linda, I had forgotten I asked a question on this thread.

I don't know the answer to your question, Donna, but Tricia pointed out that the higher fat content in the Plugra made for flakey pastries and better sauces. I don't know what it would do to cookies, but I'd guess it'd make them better. I've been told that the Kerrygold is great for slathering on toast because it tastes so good you want to taste it.

Sally


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RE: Butter vs Irish butter

I'm new here and wanted to get my feet wet. I love Plugra butter. The name comes from the french plus gras, meaning more fat. More fat always tasts good:-)


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