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Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

Posted by althetrainer (My Page) on
Fri, Mar 5, 10 at 13:43

My chocolate making experience was less than a success. The only type of chocolate I can handle is melting chocolate wafers for dipping. Other than that, none of my chocolate turned out good. Tried tempering but still couldn't get the results I wanted.

I did some research online and found some people actually use paraffin wax in their chocolate and candy, said it would help set the chocolate better. It was suggested to find the paraffin wax in the canning section along with all the canning stuff.

Went to the store today and found some. Read the label but nothing it said indicated it was edible or could be put into food. The pictures on the box were for canning, making candles, releasing stuck zippers, and even for bruised tree! It only said the wax was "refined" but nothing else. Did I find the right thing? Or do I need to keep looking?

Al


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

Is it Parowax? From the grocery store?
Blue & White box?

That's the one!

Good luck with the chocolate making!
Deanna


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

Thanks Deanna! I don't even know if we can find Parowax in Canada. It was in the grocery store unfortunately it's not called Parowax. The box was blue and white but it was a different name (can't remember). Al


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

The one that's used for canning is the correct one. I've only bought Parowax. I use about one part was per 10 parts of chocolate, but you can use 1:8 as well. I use it so that the candy is less messy to handle.

Lars


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

Thanks publickman! I may just pick some up for my next chocolate adventure! :-) Al


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

I can't imagine eating paraffin wax, edible or not! We are lucky in Australia to have a product called Copha, which we use for making chocolate and other confectionery, especially Chocolate Crackles and White Christmas. You might be able to order some online.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copha

I've done some Googling, and found this information:

There is a product in America called Palmin, which is supposed to be the same as Copha. It comes in a 250g block. You should be able to get it from Dittmer's Gourmet Meats and Wursthaus at 400 San Antonio Road, Mountain View, CA.

I've also learned that you will be sadly disappointed if you try substituting Crisco for Copha, so don't be tempted!


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

Ah thank you very much, daisyduckworth! I am in Canada and I have never heard of Palmin either. I did a search on Copha and ended up finding some very useful information. Someone moved from Australia to Canada who discovered something called Pure Creamed Coconut found in the Superstore could be use in making chocolate crackles. I will look it up when I go to the Superstore next time. Gonna have fun making some chocolate very soon. Thanks again!

Al


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

People would be amazed at what foods have wax in them....

Maybe "amazed" isn't the right word.


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

Al, you just need an ever so little bit to have your chocolate come out great. I use just alittle tiny bit in the chocolate I melt to dip my coconut Easter eggs. It makes them set up nice and quick! When I say a tiny bit, like maybe a teaspoon full if you can measure it! It's tasteless and you would never know it was in their. Most candy manufactures use way more than I would ever think it needs or would use!

Gina


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RE: Edible parafin wax for chocolate making?

Bean, I know what you mean!

Gina, coconut Easter eggs?! That sounds yummy! How do you do that? A recipe? Do tell!

Al


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