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TeresaMN - about your wild rice (also calling Arley)

Posted by foodonastump (My Page) on
Sat, Feb 15, 14 at 14:39

Being brought up in Minnesota I am very familiar with so-called Minnesota wild rice. It is a long grained dark brown rice that when cooked tastes exactly like barley. Blind folded you cannot tell the difference between it and cooked barley. It is the poorest eating rice in existence. Actually to me it tastes like mud from a pond and barley mixed together. No one ever ate it. Not one settler or Indian ever bothered with it at all as they knew it was no good for eating. We and the Indians hunted ducks in the rice beds as the wild ducks like to feed on it and that is about as far as it went. Drainage and pollution killed off most of the rice beds and when the rice began to become somewhat scarce someone decided it was good to eat because it was scarce. Immediately so-called Minnesota wild rice began to sell at nearly $2.00 or more a pound. The Indians began gathering it and men went into the rice business and began planting it. Today they do a flourishing business on so-called Minnesota wild rice and it is seeded and harvested like all other rice. The taste of Minnesota wild rice is so bad that in order to get it down you have to practically camouflage the flavor with other strong flavors. The Indians have never fallen for this modern "hokum" about Minnesota wild rice and still will not eat it if they can get other rice.

OMG, Arley, this cookbook you recommended is a trip. I'm about 10 minutes into skipping around and I realize I just need to read this one front to back!

Here is a link that might be useful: Link to Amazon - Arley's review is the Cliff Claven one


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: TeresaMN - about your wild rice (also calling Arley)

FOAS - I am familiar the book although it's been awhile since I've seen a copy. Many people considered it wacky even when the book came out. And by today's standards it is even more hilarious. It's a perfect book to read excerpts from at a party after a couple glasses of wine.

The author is a "my way or the highway" kind of a guy, an authority on absolutely everything and I'm pretty sure he was 10 sheets to the wind when writing the book(s). He wasn't the kind of a guy you would try to have a reasonable discussion with.

That said - I think he really believed everything he wrote.

He wrote several other books including one titled "How to Live with a B*tch". Had to change the spelling - GW software alerted me that it had detected a "string of characters." The real book title contained the real word - long before the days of political correctness. The contents of this book are way off the charts also. It had some sex education tips if I remember correctly. Google it and see if you can find any excerpts.

Another fun book to read at adult parties. You can't make this kind of stuff up! :-)

Thanks for the laugh. I'd forgotten about Mr. Herter.


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RE: TeresaMN - about your wild rice (also calling Arley)

It's just too funny! I also learned that All Purpose flour can lead to divorce. How? Well AP flour is a conspiracy fabricated by the bakery industry, to make it impossible for women to bake well. This leads them to buy commercial products instead. Now women have idle time when they should rather be baking, and this idle time can lead to divorce.


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RE: TeresaMN - about your wild rice (also calling Arley)

Makes you wonder what his wife Bertha was like ....... and what her life was like.

I wonder if any of his children/grandchildren are living?


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RE: TeresaMN - about your wild rice (also calling Arley)

“---------it is a long grained dark brown rice that when cooked tastes exactly like barley.------ It is the poorest eating rice in existence. Actually to me it tastes like mud from a pond and barley mixed together. No one ever ate it. Not one settler or Indian ever bothered with it at all as they knew it was no good for eating. ----“

Goes to show, you can always learn something new. I didn’t know I have been enjoying mud, and all the others who consume 70 tons every year, and pay 10 times the price for the privilege of eating mud.

Sounds like an entertaining guy. It would be fun to read his books.

dcarch


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RE: TeresaMN - about your wild rice (also calling Arley)

“---------it is a long grained dark brown rice that when cooked tastes exactly like barley.------ It is the poorest eating rice in existence. Actually to me it tastes like mud from a pond and barley mixed together. No one ever ate it. Not one settler or Indian ever bothered with it at all as they knew it was no good for eating. ----“

Goes to show, you can always learn something new. I didn’t know I have been enjoying mud, and all the others who consume 70 tons every year, and pay 10 times the price for the privilege of eating mud.

Sounds like an entertaining guy. It would be fun to read his books.

dcarch


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RE: TeresaMN - about your wild rice (also calling Arley)

  • Posted by arley 7b/8a SC (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 19, 14 at 10:21

Glad you folks are enjoying it. I love his certitude: the Virgin Mary was fond of creamed spinach; St Anthony created a famous sandwich; and the most oddball comment of all is his comment about his mayonnaise recipe:

"Using this famous recipe, mayonnaise is very easy to make and you will never have a failure with one exception. If you are a woman do not attempt to make mayonnaise during menstruating time as the mayonnaise will simply not blend together at all well. This is not superstition but a well established fact well known to all women cooks."

OMG, how many un-PC points does one assign to THAT?

The link is to the NYT Herter appreciation.

Here is a link that might be useful: NYT essay on George Leonard Herter

This post was edited by arley on Wed, Feb 19, 14 at 16:01


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