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Help with scone "blow out".

Posted by maxmom (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 5, 13 at 10:40

I've used Ann T's recipe as well as a few others, and it seems I can't get away from the sides of the scones "blowing out". They taste great but look awful.
I've tried arranging them on the pan closer together, but they just run into each other.

I have seen a recipe somewhere with an egg in it. Do you think that would help,or would it detract from the lightness of the scone?

Since I like them smaller than usual, I form a long rectangle and cut triangles from that freeform.

Any help would be appreciated.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

My guess is that you are adding too much liquid. In any scone or biscuit recipe I use the amount of liquid as a guideline. Sometimes I need slightly more and some times less.

Also, what are you cutting them with? You need a clean cut when you cut biscuits or scones.

Don't forget to put a little indent in the top of each biscuit/scone. That also helps them to rise straighter.

Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Thanks, Ann. Probably the amount of liquid added would make a big difference. I mix them in the food processor and when I dump the dough out, it seems fairly dry and takes some working to get the dough to come together. I know not to work the dough too much, but it seems necessary to get it to come together.

I do cut them with my metal bench scraper, so I do get a clean cut.

Never heard of putting the indent on the top. I'll try that.

Thanks again.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Maxmom, Try using a box grater to grate in the butter and then add the liquid using a fork to mix quickly. Just long enough to bring the dough almost together, before tipping out on to a lightly floured board. I pat the dough together, make three or four folds turning between folds and then roll or pat out. I cut using either biscuit cutters or a stainless dough scraper.

~Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I'll certainly try those tips on my next batch later today.
Dried apricot and crystalized ginger this time.

Thanks so much for the help.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

You might consider a scone pan.

I bought one of these during a sale. Love it. Very forgiving. And no more rolling out. Just blob the dough into the segmented spaces and bake. It fills out the space and then puffs up as much as it wishes.

Here is a link that might be useful: segmented scone pan


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Out of curiosity, what kind of flour are you using? Especially with so many "blow out" problems. The best choice is a low-protein flour for scones. If, for instance, you are using King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour, it has way too much protein for good quality quick breads without adding large amounts of fat, and has nearly as much protein as bread flour.

A better choice from King Arthur is a traditional Irish-Style Wholemeal Flour that works exceptionally well for scones since it's a coarse milling of soft red wheat. (See link below.)

If you use the food processor for blending the fat/dry ingredients, instead of by hand, that's when I would stop and would add the liquid by hand - as ann t suggests above - along with the folding/kneading she suggested. There is obviously too much gluten development somewhere - either from the flour and/or over-mixing in the food processor. The "blow out" is an indication the gasses from the chemical leavening are having a difficult time drilling their way through the over-developed gluten strands.

-Grainlady


Here is a link that might be useful: Irish-Style Wholemeal Flour


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I like to roll out the dough into a circle, or rectangle, then cut my scones, bake them, and finally, with bench scraper or knife, go over the pre-cut wedges once again. This will keep each unit intact.

This is an excerpt from a Cranberry Cream Scones entry I did a while back: Cut circle into 10 wedges, without detaching them. And bake for 30-35 minutes or until golden. Cut into the pre-marked wedges after they're baked..

Sol


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Yes, I am using KA unbleached AP flour. I never really paid much attention to the Irish Whole Meal flour. Would you use this only, or combine with the AP flour? I'm going to make a batch tonight and will employ the methods you mention of adding the wet ingredient judiciously by hand.
Thanks grainlady and Ann.

I did get a scone pan as shown, and have also tried the "circle" cut; however when I want smaller scones it means I have to cut by hand. I know there is a pan for smaller ones, but I haven't wanted to spend more money on scone-making by getting another expensive pan.

I guess I feel I should be able to free-cut them have them turn out without the blow-out. Guess I'm just stubborn, and by this time exasperated that I can't get the effect I want.

Thank you all for your help. I'll see what tonight's batch brings.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I use Unbleached Roger's Flour - All Purpose. Canadian flour tends to have more protein than American flour, and I haven't had a problem making a decent biscuit or scone. I have made them with a pastry flour, without any noticeable difference.

So, I think that your problem has more to do with either too much liquid, or you are over working the dough. Which can happen especially if you use a processor.

Hope tonight's batch is "perfect". Enjoy!

Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Maxmom-
I'm sorry to hear you're having this issue. I have to say, I use the same flour you use and I've not had this problem. I'll have to look for Irish Whole Meal flour. I'd like to give it a try just to see the difference.

I make scones once a week, sometimes more often! I use Rose Levy Beranbaum's recipe from The Bread Bible. I knead in the butter by hand. I tried a food processor once, but didn't like the texture of the scone.

Anyway, I squeeze the butter with the flour between my fingers until the butter gets to bean size or smaller. No big chunks. I add the cream all at once and mix with a big, heavy mixing spoon. At the end, I shape all the dough in a ball before dumping it out onto the floured surface.

I roll the dough out, trifold it like a letter, flip it over, roll and trifold the other direction and repeat until I've rolled/folded 4 times.

My last roll is rolling the dough out in a long rectangle about an 1 thick. It's about 5-6 inches wide and about 14 inches long...just a guess. I take my bench scraper and cut the dough in half down the length. Then I cut triangles from each long section. Put them on two cookie sheets with silpats and bake at 400 for about 10-12 minutes...even though the directions say more like 20, I think. Then I wrap them in cloth until they've cooled. I like my scones a little more on the moist side, though that's probably not a proper scone. I don't care for them when they get too dry.

Sometimes I make the last roll narrower, about 4 inches, so I can cut smaller triangles for more "dainty" scones. Depends on the eating audience!

This post was edited by momto4kids on Sat, Feb 23, 13 at 4:20


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I agree that the food processor is too aggressive.
8oz self-raising flour.
1 1/2 oz butter
1/4 pint milk
1 1/2 tbls caster sugar
Pinch salt
Extra flour

Pre-heat oven to 220
Sift flour and rub in butter with your fingers.
Stir in sugar and salt
Use a round knife to blend in the milk
Little by little
The, knead as little As possible into a soft dough.
Roll out to no less than 3/4 inch thick.
If you use a shape cutter, be sure not to twist in in the dough.
Bake 12_15 mins.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Traditional flour for scones was milled from soft wheat, and is still suggested for traditional results. Soft wheat varieties have the baking characteristics that work best for baked goods where you need less gluten development. If you start with a low-protein flour to begin with, you are making a good choice to help avoid too much gluten development from the very start. The more protein in the flour, the higher the chance to develop too much gluten resulting in a tough crumb. Every step in making most scones/biscuits is geared towards avoiding a large amount of gluten development. Inhibiting the formation of gluten will help produce a more tender product. This starts with coating the flour with the fat when you blend the two together to resemble a coarse meal. By using a food processor, you could easily cut the fat/flour too fine.

Add only enough liquid to form a dough. Gentle kneading to produce enough gluten for structure, but not so much as to produce a tough scone. Because the protein in flour varies from brand-to-brand and bag-to-bag, as well as the moisture already found in the flour (higher in humid weather than in dry weather), it's a "feel" thing, and the amount suggested in the recipe is just a good (or bad) guess.

A high butter or sugar content in the dough will also help inhibit the formation of gluten. So a traditional recipe that has very little fat or sugar will need very little mixing/kneading and will be best made with a low-protein flour.

Today's flour-of-choice is generally "all-purpose flour", but they are not all the same - from the type of grain it's milled from to the amount of protein it contains, so there is a wide variance of baking qualities from brand to brand.

The following information is from "CookWise" by Shirley O. Corriher.

-Southern All-Purpose Flours - (9 g or 7.5 to 9.5%) (White Lily, Martha White, Gladiola, Red Band) are milled from soft wheat, so are the best choice for baked goods where you don't want a lot of gluten development - quick breads, pie crusts, biscuits, muffins, etc. The amount of protein in the flour is that difference between a nice soft crumb and a tough crumb.

-National Brands - (11 g or 10-12%) (Gold Medal, Pillsbury) are milled from a mixture of hard and soft wheat and have a higher amount of protein. "A little too much protein for best pie crusts, quick breads, muffins, or pancakes; too little protein to make outstanding yeast breads.

-Northern All-Purpose Flours - 11-12 g or 11-12%) (Robin Hood, Hecker's) have a little more protein.

-King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour - (13 g or 11.7%) even more protein. Recommended use - yeast breads, cream puffs, puff pastry, pasta and pizza due to the high amount of protein.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So, it's not as much about what's right or wrong to use, as much as it is about understanding what baking characteristics to expect from the flour you use.

-Grainlady


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I wish I could remember all I wrote this morning documenting the results of last night's scones, but my computer acted up and I lost it before I could post it. That's been the story of my life in the last few days. In the middle of mixing the scones last night I discovered my six month old pup was chewing one of my favorite shoes, and I had lost at bridge also.

Anyway, I chilled everything, including the metal bowl I mixed everything in. I grated 3/4 of the frozen butter and cut the rest into small pieces and put that in the refrigerator. I then mixed only the dry ingredients in the food processor, poured it into the cold metal bowl, added the butter and worked it quickly with my fingers, then poured in the cold cream. I think I put about 3/4 of a cup in. I tried mixing it with a fork, but it was too dry. I added a tablespoon or more of the cream, mixed a bit then emptied it onto the lightly floured board and tried to pat it into a cohesive lump, but it still was too dry and crumbly. I should have put it back in the bowl and added more cream, but instead just tried to add it while on the board. I think I spent too much time trying to beat it into submission, but just tried to form a log at that point, although it was still pretty crumbly. There was no way I could fold it at all. I just couldn't believe that it would take that much more cream! I should have put the cut scones into the refrigerator, but didn't. I got some blow-out, not as much, but they still were not as I thought they should be. By that time I was pretty discouraged with the whole day.

I will get some White Lily, as that is readily available here in the South. I'll just have to keep adding cream till I can get a dough that is soft pliable enough to be folded while forming. If those things don't work, I think I'll try making soup, which I've never done much of either, but might be easier!

Thanks for all your encouragement and suggestions. I've listened to all of them I really won't give up, although I don't know what I'll do with all my mistakes.

P.S. I also lost at bridge today.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Maxmom, I'm curious about your recipe which uses butter and cream. Anyway. This recipe is dead easy, my DD was making good scones with it when she was 8.

Note: amounts are approximate because flour and liquids behave differently on any given day :-)

About 3 1/2 cups self raising flour (I have good results mixing 1 tsp baking powder per cup of flour to make SR flour if I don't have any handy)
1 cup of cream, sour cream, or cream that has turned a little
1 cup of water, soda water or 7-Up
If using fresh cream add a tablespoon of lemon juice

Mix gently into a softish dough. Pat dough out into a 1" thick round and cut with a sharp cutter. Place scones next to each other on a tray which has been dusted with flour. Brush tops with milk and bake in the top half of a hot oven until done, about 15 minutes.

You can add dried fruit (sultanas, craisins etc) and sugar to these if you wish. Good luck!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

You're making this far too complicated! :-)
No need to freeze anything. Scones are something you whip up in a couple of minutes. Look at my or Colleen's recipe. Although I've never seen one without butter, I'm going to try it for the low calories hahaa.
Forget the food mixer!!!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I agree with islay corbel....

Islay -

I'm making Oat Farls this morning and they don't have any fat added, other than what's in the buttermilk and the lovely pat of butter you top them with when eating. I've posted the recipe on-line so many times over the years as a traditional Irish bread, it's easy to find if I do a search for it anymore, including at the link below. The recipe even includes my notes about making the farls (wedges) smaller (more the size of a biscuit) by forming the dough into 2 rounds, 1-inch thick, and cutting into 8ths. These days, I usually make 1/2 a recipe, which makes 8 small farls.

The recipe appeared in a magazine article "Irresistible Irish Breads - by Deborah Krasner - circa 1989.

I'm making a gluten-free version today to take to a friend who is under the weather.

-Grainlady

Here is a link that might be useful: Recipe Cottage


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I agree with Islay too. Like biscuits, scones are something I make on the spur of the moment.

I made Mini Red Currant Scones for breakfast yesterday. I cut the dough in half and made six small scones from each half.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Colleenoz: I was using Ann T's recipe that called for butter and cream.

Sorry if my explanation indicated that I making things too complicated. I was only trying to show the lengths I had gone to get the desired results so that someone might tell me what I was doing wrong. Apparently a lot! I started using the food processor because someone on the CF had mentioned that they do and that it simplified things. I figured then that using it just to incorporate all the dry ingredients really well would help.

I tried making scones because I thought they would be easy, something I could do, and yet I never could get them right with the methods I was using and was just looking for some instruction.

Sorry to beat a dead horse.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Maxmom,
You're not beating a dead horse! It's frustrating when you repeatedly try making something and the results seem to never come out as you expect. I searched for years for a chocolate chip cookie recipe that produced cookies the way my family likes them. I tried everyone's T&T recipes, never producing what they seemed to produce. Finally, I found a recipe that works for me.

You're not necessarily over-complicating the process. The food processor, while making the chore easier on one hand, can lead to over working the dough. You want butter pieces...not fully blended flour and butter that "become one" after the process. (I don't cut the butter into 1" cubes as the recipe states. Too much toruble. I just unwrap the stick and lop of pieces with a table knife into the flour.) The only time I've been unhappy with how my scones turned out was once when I used the food processor (the butter was tooooo processed into the flour and I didn't achieve the texture I usually achieve) and a few times when I let the butter get too soft. I have noticed that if my butter is too soft (hence my overall dough is too warm), then my scones don't look as flaky and layered as they usually do. I think the overall temperature of the dough may make some difference...and that might be why RLB recommends using COLD, COLD ingredients. If I've been pokey getting the scones ready for the oven, I'll get them on the cookie sheet and toss them in the fridge for about 10 minutes to cool them down.

On really hot days, maybe I'll toss the butter and cream in the freezer for a few minutes while I preheat the oven. But, truly I don't usually bother. I make them on the spur of the moment, too, but they do take more than a few minutes. Assembly of the ingredients is quick...but the 4 times rolling, folding, flip, repeat...takes more than a few minutes! But it's not onerous!

If you haven't tried it yet, try the RLB recipe and see if that one works for you. I use it as my base recipe, for just about all the varieties I make. The only other "scone" recipe I use is the Starbuck's CopyCat Pumpkin Scones recipe...it uses egg and is a "wetter" dough. I don't love it, but those scones are always the first to go. Good luck!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Momto4: Thanks so much. I appreciate the comforting words.
As I mentioned in my last post, I have only used the food processor to mix the dry ingredients any only because it was sitting in front of me.

I have printed out the RLB recipe and will try it when I can next think about making scones without swearing, LOL.

I mentioned I had seen a recipe with an egg in it, but got no response to my question about that addition. I thought it might be sacriligious to even mention it.

Seems like basically my dough has not been moist enough.

Thanks again Momto4.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Momto4: Thanks so much. I appreciate the comforting words.
As I mentioned in my last post, I have only used the food processor to mix the dry ingredients any only because it was sitting in front of me.

I have printed out the RLB recipe and will try it when I can next think about making scones without swearing, LOL.

I mentioned I had seen a recipe with an egg in it, but got no response to my question about that addition. I thought it might be sacriligious to even mention it.

Seems like basically my dough has not been moist enough.

Thanks again Momto4.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Sorry for the duplicate pot. Computer is doing funny things.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Maxmom, I know a lot of scone recipes call for eggs. I just never found them necessary. But, you should give it a try and see for yourself which you prefer. The Barefoot Contessa (Ina Garten) adds eggs to her scone recipes.

~Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I just talked this morning about scones with my friend who is on a three month round the world, or a good portion of it, right now. She left Australia a few days ago where her friend gave her this recipe: 4 c sifted self rising flour, 1c 7up, 100 ml heavy cream. She said they were delicious.

Eileen


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Eillen, that's similar to my recipe but I can't help but feel the cream measurement is off. That's not really enough liquid for that amount of flour IMO. (My recipe originally is 4 1/2 c SR flour, 300ml 7-Up and 300ml cream.) The liquid would be a total of 350ml, which is a _lot_ less.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Colleen, I will give my friend the correction. She is on the move and not a cook and I can't make any sense of metric on the fly, nor can she! Thanks!

Eileen


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

A cup is 250 ml, to give an idea, so 100ml is 2/5 cup. Cream is sold in 300ml cartons (a leftover from the days of the pint and half-pint (which is 20fl oz here) which is equal to about 600ml and 300ml). Standard practice for that particular scone recipe is to pour the cream onto the flour, then fill the now empty cream carton with 7-Up (or soda water or plain water) and pour that in as well.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Are scones supposed to taste like baking powder or is it just my boyfriend's recipe? It seems to me that I had some others with a noticeable taste of baking powder also.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Two possible causes of that taste are:

1. The type of baking powder which contains an aluminum compound. Are you using Calumet or Clabber Girl? If so, try Rumford.

2. Too much baking powder. How much is used in BF's recipe? More than 1 or 2 teaspoons per cup of flour can give a noticeable taste.

Jim


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Deleting duplicate post.

This post was edited by jimster on Sat, Feb 9, 13 at 22:06


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I use Ann T's recipe also, and I use King Arthur all purpose flour and my scones turn out well. Most times.

Occasionally they just seem to "melt" onto the pan and become flat instead of rising up tall and flaky. We eat them and the next batch is usually fine, so I don't know what I do to that occasional batch.

I cannot manage to make any dough successfully with the food processor. The pie crust gets tough and too warm and then I have to freeze it to chill it enough to work with it. Biscuits and scones become tough. I think I do not hve a light enough touch with that pulse function....

Anyway, 've gone back to making pastry and biscuits by hand, they turn out so much better.

Hey, but you have some delicious "mistakes" to eat up!

Annie


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

"Occasionally they just seem to "melt" onto the pan and become flat instead of rising up tall and flaky."

There are three types of baking powder. One is activated by moisture. One is activated by heat. The other, called double acting, is a mixture of the two. When using the moisture activated type, if not put in the oven right away its gas making power can be expended too soon.

I'm probably wrong in thinking that is your problem because I can't imagine that you delay putting it in the oven for very long and I am certainly no baking expert. Far from it. But it seems that it must have something to do with the leavening.

Jim


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Well if it makes anyone feel better, I can't make scones worth a darn either. Me and dough are mortal enemies. Mine are tolerable though, with enough butter and jam!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Wow! True confessions. It sure does make me feel better to know that some of you will confess to having a hard time making scones and working with dough. Thanks for 'fessing up. I've always been fearful of admitting that I have trouble with some baking/cooking issues, but occasionally will have to resort to asking for help from some of you and I've been grateful for the patience you've shown and the expertise shared.

I did buy some White Lily flour yesterday, by the way, and will try the scorned scones again! Thanks for sharing all your knowledge Grainlady.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Oh, Maxmom, you are not alone. I can't bake worth a damn, so I rarely will do it. Why set myself up for aggrevation? I would rather make dinner for 40 than bake.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Jim, I use the same baking powder and the same recipe and do not dely in putting them in the oven. Sometimes they turn out great, sometimes not. Go figure.

They always taste good, though.

Annie


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

And that is what matters Annie.

~Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Annie,

What you said is just what I expected. It only makes sense. There must be an explanation though. I wonder why none of the bakers on this forum have one. This is puzzling.

Jim


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Yes, Jim, I agree, there must be a reason. But I use the same pan and the same oven, the same brand of butter and flour, the same baking powder. Maybe my kitchen is a little warmer sometimes, but I don't think so, my house is pretty constant at 55F all winter. Perhaps the flour, although the same brand it can differ due to age and humidity and the soil conditions when the wheat is grown, how it was stored before I bought it, you know the drill.

As far as I can see, though, everything is the same. I even use the same measuring utensils and the same bowl to mix the dough. Usually they are nice and light and flaky, but sometimes they just "melt" and end up a puddle about 1/2 inch thick with crunchy edges...

Annie


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Jim, I am a science teacher and we have a saying when we teach, "it's ALWAYS like this . . . except when it's not." Explains a lot of scientific laws. Nature is so darn variable!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Nature is so darn variable!

I only minimally recall a story about a sausage factory that made a popular distinctly red variety that was so successful that they built a new addition for its production. Unfortunately, they couldn't reproduce the red color and it took them a year to find the problem.

Unfortunately, I have completely forgotten the details but it had something to do with the assistant who originally needed to cart the sausage to or from a storage room to allow other production that may have been down a hall or outside into another building and perhaps passed by a source of carbon dioxide or something. Of course this transport or temporary storage was not needed in the upgraded modern facility.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I have the day off so decided spur of the moment to make scones using Colleen's recipe. I had self rising flour that I needed to use up. As per usual, I monkeyed with the recipe, subbing 1/2 cup oat bran for some of the flour since my Pillsbury self rising flour was whiter than white, which I am not crazy about. I used 1/2 cup nonfat yogurt and 1/2 cup of coconut milk that was past its prime for the sour milk, and ginger ale instead of 7-up because that's what I had. I was going to use dried currants but some apricots were in front of them in the pantry so I use them. Ginger apricot sounded good. All my baking trays are gone, either at work or wrecked so I had to use the bottom of my roasting pan covered with waxed paper for the baking. Forgot to paint them with milk so they came out a little crusty on top.

The results weren't very good, but I think that is because the flour was old and not very good. The dough was overly sticky so I had to knead some extra flour into it, maybe 2 TBLSP so they were also a little over kneaded. You should kneed maybe 8 times and I did these for about 16. They have a bitter taste which I think comes from the marginal flour. Also not very flaky, which comes from the over kneading. And my kitchen is covered with flour and dough and I'm in a crabby mood. Me and dough, my nemesis!! :(

To be fair, my kitchen work space is about 3 square feet so it doesn't take much for the whole "kitchen" to get messy!

Here's the photos!


This post was edited by lpinkmountain on Mon, Feb 18, 13 at 12:37


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I'm sorry you were disappointed with your scones, Pink. They look very nice to me.

I like the roughness because it makes all those tasty brown nubs.

Jim


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I agree Jim. The scones look good. Too bad you didn't like the flavour Lpink. If you don't bake a lot, maybe you should keep your flour in the freezer.

We had homemade biscuits with sausage gravy for breakfast. Moe had his with scrambled eggs. I like just the biscuits and gravy.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I sure wish I could make home made sausage gravy! I can make a regular gravy almost anytime, with a rue or slurry, but darned if I can get sausage gravy to taste right. And with all this talk about making scones, you know what I 'm gonna end up doing. On top of having made chocolate chip cookies last night.......

Tami


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Tami, Sausage gravy isn't much different than making regular gravy. I brown the sausage in butter, season with garlic, salt and pepper. Once the sausage is brown, I add flour and cook (like a roux). I use chicken broth and cream in my sausage gravy and season with more black pepper and sage. Probably not traditional, but then again, Biscuits and sausage gravy are not traditional in Canada.

~Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Your scones looks good to me Pink!
I make biscuits, I should try scones.

 photo Biscuits.jpg


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Maxmom - not much of a scone baker - which is why I could not offer advice.

One thing I do love to make for any meal is a good bisquit though. Jasdip - your bisquits make me want to run home and make a batch!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Those biscuit pictures have me making biscuits to go with dinner tonight. I plan to add cheddar cheese and some roasted garlic. Yum! Love biscuits.

lpink--I think your scones look great!

I made the usual chocolate chip scones yesterday...but I wasn't paying attention to the amount I was making. Usually I make a double batch. Yesterday I made a single batch, but added chips for a double batch! Yikes! No one has complained yet! I also made pumpkin scones, using canned pumpkin puree. I had leftover puree since I only made one batch, so I made pumpkin soup to go with dinner. It was actually pretty good!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

There really isn't a difference between "scones" and Biscuits. At least not in the US or Canada. Biscuits tend to be something else in England.

But the basics are the same - flour, salt, baking powder (and baking soda if using buttermilk or sour milk) and some fat (Butter, Lard, Shortening) are what both are made from. Scones tend to be "sweet" with sugar added, and cut in wedges and biscuits tend to be savory and cut into rounds or squares. If you can make one you can make the other. Same technique.

For variation, add fruits (blueberries, raspberries, raisins, cranberries, chocolate, nuts, poppyseeds, etc.. to scones and add savory ingredients to biscuits - ham, chives, roasted garlic, cheese (cheddar, blue, etc..). It is all good regardless of what they are called.

~Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Colleen, was your recipe supposed to have some fat in it? That may be one reason my scones are so hard. I just used self rising flour (which in the US does not have hydrogenated fat in it), sour milk and ginger ale. Today they are akin to some of the salt clay animals I have been making for a class I am teaching.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Lpink, Sol, also makes a cream scone that does not contain additional fat.

She posted a link to her blog.

Here is a link that might be useful: Sol's Scones


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Well, my recipe calls for sour _cream_, which is mostly fat. Using sour _milk_ may be part of your problem.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Thanks Ann. I may give it another try this weekend.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Hi Folks
A long time since I posted here, probably under a different user name.
Agree with Colleen of Oz. Scones are simple using her method.
We call it 'three, one and one'. That is:
Three cups of self raising flour, (must be fresh)
One cup of single cream.
One cup of lemonade.
Pinch of salt.
Mix them up in a bowl using a spatula but stop as soon as mixed.
Scrape out on to a floured board and gently bring it together; don't knead it, doesn't need it!
Roll out carefully to about 1.5 cms or a bit thicker. Cut out scones, bring rest together, re-roll and cut more. I get about twelve.
Put on buttered tray or baking paper and brush tops with milk.
In the meantime get oven up to 220°C, about 430°F. Whack them in for about 12 to 15 minutes, time will depend on your oven.
Eat with a dollop of jam and some spare cream whipped up.
Do's
Use fresh flour.
Use light hands.
Don'ts
Over-work or knead the mix.
Let the kids have more than their fair share!

The method works for me every time and is quick and easy. I'm told beer can be used instead of lemonade, also soda water. Perhaps you guys in the States could experiment with Coca cola!
Happy cooking.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Note: By "lemonade" Ruimi means a 7-Up type carbonated drink, as opposed to the US lemonade of lemon juice, sugar and water.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

What is single cream, please?

Tami


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Light cream as opposed to heavy cream. Cream suitable for whipping.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Then I suppose it would be what we call Half and Half. Our Whipping Cream or Heavy Whipping Cream would be too heavy. Darn, I have Whipping Cream in the fridge! Though I would have to "make" self rising flour......

Thanks


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Tami, the recipe I linked uses 2 cups of heavy cream. I usually use heavy whipping cream, but have used half & half or milk when i forgot to get cream!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Hello again.
Just for interest here is a photo of a batch of 3,1 and 1's made on my Webber Q. Not the best I've made but OK.
BTW What do you mean by "blow out"?


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

No, half and half is not light cream. Whipping cream is fine (as in "Cream suitable for whipping").
For self-rising flour simply add 1 teaspoon of baking powder per cup of flour.
Ruimi, I think they mean their scones spread out instead of up.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Just thought I'd revisit...I just finished making chocolate chip scones for the kids' breakfast tomorrow. Had my camera in the kitchen and just thought I'd take a couple pix. These are:

1. The way I roll them out in a long rectangle and cut them into triangles. I made smaller ones, they're about an inch high, the usual thickness I roll to.

2. A close-up of the layers you can see from my 4 times roll, fold, repeat.

3. Final product. It's a good 1 3/4 inches high or so. Golden brown edges, nice layered look, moist inside. I underbake them because we don't like them so dry.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Ruimi Love the high 'rise'! Very tasty looking!

momto4kids, those are some gorgeous looking scones! I love the rectangle idea!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Momto4kids - those are the best looking scones I've ever seen!!!! I'm not a scone person because pastries/sweets don't appeal to me in general. Scones usually look dry and unappealing to me.

Your scones look absolutely delightful, moist and flaky. YUM!!!! Great photos!


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

I agree entirely with Teresamn. But, with pictures like that, I could be a convert.

Thanks for sharing.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Deb, you really have mastered the perfect scone. Just Beautiful.

~Ann


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Momto4. Lovely! Did you use the R.L. Beranbaum recipe for those? I haven't tried it yet, but do intend to. I too have always used the rectangle shape for mine. I can get any size that way.

Your dough looks a lot more workable, i.e. moist, than mine ever did. Mine don't brown on top like yours, even though I use the same temp, 400, for the same length of time. I brush them with cream before baking. I haven't noticed my oven temp is off, but there's always that possibility.


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RE: Help with scone "blow out".

Thank you! Thank you!!

ssomerville...I roll one long rectangle, use my bench scraper to cut in half lengthwise, then bang out the triangles. Super fast and easy and consistent!

teresa_mn and mustangs...I think the secret is to underbake, which is probably not very scone-like, but I only bake them about 10 minutes...12 max. They are waaaaay too dry if baked the length of time the recipe states.

ann_t...they still don't rise like yours! But I'm getting there!! :)

maxmom...yes, I use the RLB recipe. I don't use a food processor, just my hands! I use heavy whipping cream. The one thing I started doing after mixing in the cream and chips, dried fruit, whatever...is use my hands to form all the dough and dry bits into a ball (somewhat kneading it and continuing to push it all together) before I put it on the mat to roll. The 4 times roll, fold, repeat builds the layers in the dough. I'm not all that gentle with it, as opposed to biscuits...that I only roll once (no folding, etc) and use TLC! Lastly, I do not brush the tops of the scones (or biscuits).

Thank you again all!! :)


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