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Timing Belt Question

Posted by goldensmom (My Page) on
Wed, Jun 8, 05 at 15:15

Ok I know that timing belts are important but would like opinions on when to get a new one. Have a 92 camry and I know it says 60,000 mine has 70,000 but I'm wondering if how it is driven makes a difference in holding out for a new one. City vs highway driving?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Timing Belt Question

usually makes no difference. These are tested on all driving conditions. When they say 60,000 they didn't throw a dart at the wall and hit the 60,000 mark and put that in
the book. The belt could go for 100,000 but they protect
themselfs and you by saying change it at 60,000. I've seen
them go at 40,000.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

The timing belt is not a part that you want to wait for failure. Not to mention being stranded you can do serious internal damage to the motor if it fails.

I'm sure the 60k recommendation is pretty conservative, but you're fighting the statistical averages the longer you wait.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Fully agree with kalining and sdello.
All the owner can do is keep the belt clean and dry..
After 60K it becomes too risky, the belt itself is not that expensive, and I do know than on a Honda or a VW, they are fairly easy to change..


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Deferring maintenance is always a gamble because you increase your risk of a breakdown, but having said that, I do not believe that any engine that went into a Camry in that year will be damaged if the timing belt breaks. You will, however, be stranded if it breaks, and you'll have to have the car towed to a shop.

Timing belt life is affected not only by mileage but by time, as the belt will crack and weaken due to the heat of the engine and age. I don't know if this is the original belt on this engine, but if it is, you're definitely due for a new one due to its age as much as its mileage. If this is a replacement belt and it hasn't been on that long, it's less urgent, but I'd still want to change it fairly soon.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Unless you know for sure that you have a free spinning engine (one where the pistons will not hit the valves when the cam shaft stops turning), do not take any chance with the timing belt. Replace it on schedule. It's just too expensive if the pistons hit the valves.

Time and temperature are major factors affecting belt aging. Other factors, but not necessarily all factors, are loads and speed.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Do you plan on keeping the car much longer?If so replace it.If not let the other guy worry about it.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

my timing belt lasted 150k. way too long but I have a V-6 OHC motor and did not want to do the job. my WP started leaking and made the belt slip and 1 cam sprocket jumped 3-4 teeth and stalled the motor. hmm, worn loose belt, slippery anti-freeze equals stalled motor. I got lucky, my engine is non-interference.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Pretty good car,IMO, Joe.
What brand and year ??
The Saab/GM V6 had to have the belt changed every 30,000 miles !! A 80s to 90s design - they no longer use this engine...


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RE: Timing Belt Question

We have a 2000 Honda Accord and I just read where the timing
belt should be changed at 100,000 miles.
My Grandson wants to drive it to Texas and I was thinking I
may have it changed although the mileage is 86,000 miles.
It did say to change it at 60,000 under certain driving conditions.
So should I have it changed now or wait til it gets a few more miles?


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RE: Timing Belt Question

I have a 98 and 00 accord. My 98 has 118,000 miles on it w/ original belt. I would keep driving with it. I had a belt break on my eagle talon with 152,000 on the orginal belt.

there pretty tough.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

i have only ever changed one, on a 2300 engine in a ford ranger, changed it at 150k and the belt looke to be in great shape no cracks or wear. maybe just luck or the way it was driven, it was a buddys truck he bought it new and the miles were put on quick, all highway.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

I would change that belt every 60K miles like you're supposed to,you don't want to be stranded somewhere if and when it does break.It'll cost about $300 to get it changed.Toyotas have non-interference motors so if it does break the valves don't smash up against the pistons and bend like they would on a Honda.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Toyotas have non-interference motors

Not a true statement. The newer Toyota engines are interference designs.

Here is a link that might be useful: Interference Engines


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Wow that's a great link,into my favorites it goes!Seems like most of those are V6 engines.My 03 Matrix has a timing chain,which makes the engine a bit noisy until it warms up,then you can barely hear it running.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Thanks, I did have all the belts and everything checked
out and also the oil changed.
The service guy said everything looked great.
I'm selling it soon, so if it gets my grandson to Texas and
back with no problems so much the better.

Thanks so much.

Jan


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RE: Timing Belt Question

If you're getting timing chain noise at startup, try using a different oil filter. Some filters just don't have a very good anti-drainback valve design and this results in the timing chain noise because the hydraulic tensioner isn't getting oil fast enough because the anti-drainback valve didn't do what it's name says it does.

Ford had issued a TSB about timing chain startup noise on the '95 Contour/Mystique--they went so far as to redesign their FL-820 oil filter with a silicone anti-drainback valve to fix the problem, and it did.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

I am about to buy a 97 camry LE which has 130,000 mileage and its timing belt were never changed.
Is it safe to buy the car if the timing belt were not changed in time?
Incase i change the timing belt immedeately, is there anything else i need to change ?


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RE: Timing Belt Question

I'll make this a Andy Rooney post. Why is it that cars with timing belts that have to be change every 60,000 miles call this procedure "Maintance". But if you have a Gm or Ford product with 250,000 miles on it and needs the timing chain serviced call a "Repair". ;>)

Also have you ever did a timing chain on a Mercedes Diesel. The one that is about 8ft. long and has to be threaded through the block and around the injector pump and time the pump.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

I have a 99 Toyota Tacoma V6, 4WD which I bought new with 53000 miles. It has less miles, but more time on the belt than recomended. What are your opinions on changing the belt? I am being told to change the water pump at the same time!


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RE: Timing Belt Question

You are being advised correctly. In fact not only should you replace the water pump, you should use a timing belt kit which will include the tensioner and idler pullies as well as the belt.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

I also agree. The correct way is to replace the water pump and order the timing belt kit while the timing cover is off.


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RE: Timing Belt Question

Change the belt at the service schedule. There may be no damage to the belt like mine was when I changed it, but you want to cover yourself. The belt will go eventually, and you are not saving yourself any money by prolonging the change. In fact, as the belt loosens the timing can change and cause premature damage to the motor, so you want to change it at the right time. See my guide for tips: http://factoidz.com/timing-belt-change-tips-1991-honda-accord/

Here is a link that might be useful: Timing Belt Change Tips


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RE: Timing Belt Question

i have a 92 accord lx. just replace the timing belt and water pump. when i start the car it makes a knocking sound like the belt is hitting the cover. i look at the belt on the bottom pully and it shows to close to the cover . i how do fix that


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