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Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Posted by HeatherKB6 (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 17, 12 at 0:37

Hi all!
I'm looking for suggestions on how to add to our house elevation exterior detailing. We are going for the craftsman look, but want it to be "our" craftsman house- with a bit of a wow-factor. Any suggestions? We definitely plan to add thicker trim as we love that look, and the door on the right at the front of the house will also have a covered porch with railings. The left side of the house is back 2 feet, with the stone part coming forward one foot, and then the entry up another foot. Any and all thoughts and suggestions would be great! Thanks in advance all! :)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Wow! I really like it and can't think of anything you could do to improve. Very nice!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I like it a lot as well. Looks very functional and is the perfect balance of looking interesting without looking overdone or gawdy. I especially like how the different size windows on the front add interest and balance.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Two thoughts: change the front door style to match the right side door and you could make the front porch columns tapered.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I am not that familiar with craftsman details, but I think this door would look lovely.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Have you picked out garage doors yet? I know that nice ones aren't cheap, but they can bring the look from blah to really terrific and custom. (And since your garage is large and faces front it will be noticeable.)

We have doors from Clopay and have been very happy with them. (I have no affiliation with Clopay.)

Here is a link that might be useful: Clopay


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I agree about garage doors bedding to stand out since they are seen from the front.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Thank you all for the thoughts on the exterior! I do love the idea of sprucing up the garage doors. Anyone have any ideas they want to shoot me as far as images go? We'd like them to have a gradual curve to them. Would you go for the wood-look with a wood-looking front door? Any suggestions would be great! I definitely agree that we don't want to house to look too gawdy! Just the right amount. :)


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

One thing that dresses up our elevation is a faux dormer window in the attic space.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Ohh..What about garage doors like this?

minneapolisite- That sounds like a cool idea. Do you have any pictures I could see? Thanks for the thought!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Does the architect know you want a Craftsman? The roof pitch, shallow eaves, arched windows and gable returns suggest "Neo-Eclectic."

Here is a link that might be useful: Craftsman Style Guide


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

It's going to be tough to make a house of this volume and height look like it was Craftsman inspired but I would start by lowering the roof slopes, eliminating the cornice returns, extending the eave overhangs and exposing their undersides.

There are several historic styles that are better suited for this house shape.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Thanks so much Renovator8! Do you have any photos for me to look at that would describe this? Such as the eave overhangs and undersides? I'm a visual girl! :) Thanks!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Whallyden- for some reason I can't open your link. Could you please explain to me of show me a photo of the eaves you have in mind? Thanks!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Wallyden's link is a pdf. Do you have a pdf reader on your computer? If not, visit Adobe and get a pdf reader and then you should be able to see it.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Heather, IMHO your design is not a Craftsman Style house and it cannot be made into one by adding Craftsman detailing. It falls somewhere between Victorian and Colonial revival with modern builder "up-grade" features like the awkward cornice returns and the token low belt line.

Wallyden's guide should make your dilemma clear to you. Your house might be included in the "Transitional" section if it had more Craftsman detailing but it would never have the elegance of either style.

If I were the architect for this project (that's not a offer of service), I would try to convince you to adapt the house to the Shingle Style (a transitional style between Victorian and Colonial Revival). IMHO it's perfect for your house and I personally have always liked it better than the Craftsman Style for houses other than bungalows.

Here is a link that might be useful: Shingle Style examples


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Thank you for the feedback. Like I said, we're not wanting it to be a textbook craftsman. I guess I've never understood why houses have to be exactly just one style. We like the detailing of craftsman houses, but we're much more eclectic. I appreciate the feedback. I think the thing that I'm learning more and more from this forum is "to each their own". Different things are beautiful/work better/are more ideal for different families for different reasons. Thanks all!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

BTW Renovator8, the last thing I want is to stir up drama about our house building. Which is why I would take the "H" out of your IMHO if you use words like "awkward", "never have the elegance of", "that's not a offer of service", etc. in the future if I were you. We all know that these houses are like our babies, and I wouldn't go throwing around those words if I were to be "humble". I appreciate the link you gave me. You may not appreciate this house for what it is, but I can assure you in the end it will be what we want it to be.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I've been an architect for over 40 years and the only difference between the advice I gave you and what I would give a client is that here it costs you nothing.

If you come to a forum seeking free advice you should not come with a defensive attitude or a chip on your shoulder.

I suggest you take my advice to someone who can take it objectively and ask them to give it a fair chance like so many others have done with success here at the GardenWeb.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I am sooo not a dramatic person, so really don't need a forum to cause drama. We are working with an architect who has been doing this for 30 years, and we're very happy with the progress thus far, but are looking for the fine-tunning ideas. I appreciate your advice and opinions, but I was just realying the fact that I didn't appreciate the way you presented it. I don't like it when people throw out the word "humble" without living up to its meaning. I've been following this forum for years and love reading about people's stories and dreams and ideas. It's a great place to live the process together, but I would never take someone's plans and rip them apart just because they didn't fit a mold. Opinions are opinions, suggestions are suggestions. I was just expressing that there could be a little more balance in your approach to critique.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I am curious why you did not get upset with Wallyden for calling your house "Neo-Eclectic", an entirely accurate description that I would have considered too insulting to use on the forum but I commend Wallyden for being straight-forward and helpful as usual.

Perhaps it would help you to know that the more common term for a large Neo-Eclectic home is "McMansion", an unnecessarily crass characterization.

Some architectural reference info:

"A Neoeclectic home can be difficult to describe because it combines many styles. The shape of the roof, the design of the windows, and decorative details may be inspired by several different periods and cultures.

Features of Neoeclectic Homes:

Constructed in the 1960s or later
Historic styles imitated using modern materials like vinyl or imitation stone
Details from several historic styles combined
Details from several cultures combined
Brick, stone, vinyl, and composite materials combined

About Neoeclectic Houses

During the late 1960s, a rebellion against modernism and a longing for more traditional styles influenced the design of modest tract housing in North America. Builders began to borrow freely from a variety of historic traditions, offering Neoeclectic (or, Neo-eclectic) houses that were "customized" using a mixture of features selected from construction catalogs. These homes are sometimes called Postmodern because they borrow from a variety of styles without consideration for continuity or context. However, Neoeclectic homes are not usually experimental and do not reflect the artistic vision you would find in a truly original, architect-designed postmodern home.

Critics use the term McMansion to describe a Neoeclectic home that is over-sized and pretentious. Coined from the McDonald's fast food restaurant, the name McMansion implies that these homes are hastily assembled using cheaply-made materials and a menu of mix-and-match decorative details. "

Here is a link that might be useful: Neo-Eclectic houses


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

The whole point is that your home is NOT the style you were requesting from the architect and is better suited to a transitional style. Tacking on a few details doesn't address the core issue at all. It just makes it look like it was poorly thought through by a draftsman who knows nothing about actual architectural history.

It is NOT about "to each his own". There ARE aesthetic standards and rules. That is how the human eye determines if something is ugly vs. attractive. How about doing a little reading and educating yourself here instead of getting your hackles up from the best advice you'll ever get for the biggest monetary expenditure you'll ever make.

Research Shingle style and compare it to what you're building. I think you might actually be pleasantly surprised at how suitable it is for your desires. Especially since without a much more complete makeover on roof pitch, etc, you will never have even "Craftsman details" here.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

My point is confirmed: you certainly are a "humble" person.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Anyway, to OP one of the most famous shingle styles is the one from Something's Gotta Give. Here is a house mimicked after it. The two story living room made me think of you. Just in case you want an alternative look to the ones we played around with. But I warn you it has a balcony hallway. This house is several million dollars on the waterfront in Martha's Vineyard...so I am sure the staff worry about keeping the kids from throwing stuff over...lol


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Thanks for the photos! I think you definitely get what we're looking for gaonmymind! I love it! Thanks for posting!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I did not assume anything other than you were tying to make a Neo-eclectic house look more like a Craftsman house and anyone with extensive experience in house design will tell you that it's not possible. Adding some exposed overhangs and shingles will not be enough on such a large house. Leave the house as it is or make it a Shingle Style with flared shingles, strongly trimmed paired windows, strong gables/dormers, and some classical detailing if you really want to "spice things up".

Those who learn about archictural styles from what they overhear or read on the internet rarely understand that historic styles are not set in stone but they do follow a larger set of rules having to do with the social and economic era in which they occurred. The result is a sense of style that is independent of individual features. A Craftsman Style house should adhere to the original ideas of Greene & Greene who wished to bring the outdoors into the house and use natural materials. Low sloping roofs with large exposed beamed overhangs walls of stone and wood shingles are part of how they achieved their goals. But the use of these ideas today are limited to a few trivial details that builders add to a house to "spice it up" and that is a shame because there is so much to be learned from artisans like the Greene brothers.

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Image and video hosting by TinyPic


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I have posted the house from "Something's got to Give" on this forum many times as a great example of the Shingle Style.

I can think of no more appropriate style of reducing the scale and volume of a large house.
Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Here is a link that might be useful: Shingle Style house in the Hamptons


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I don't think of our house as being such a big house, I guess. My husband and I are 28 with 4 kids and looking to build our "forever" house starting this Fall. Any photos you can find that would fit the general layout of our house that I can see it more visually? Thanks for your time!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Previous Shingle Style discussions on the Home Building forum:

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/build/msg0212290114477.html

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/build/msg010836092099.html

Here is a link that might be useful: Shingle Style recomendations


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Just our of curiosity, what would you call this house?


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I have never offered a design to a client without a perspective drawing or physical model, which for the past 15 years would be a 3D computer model that they could move around on their own computer. And it's not just that I am thorough about design presentations - without a model I wouldn't be able to know when the house was good enough to justify the expense of construction.

I can't do much without a plan of your house and site information I'm not going to spend any more time on it since you already have an architect who should be able to provide you with everything you need and I need to attend to my clients today.

Remember, an architectural style is not merely a collection of features and details; it's something that evolved during a particular era in a particular place and it changed as it moved to other places so if you want to combine the salient features and details of one with another you must first learn how and why they developed and changed so you can use them with care, respect and insight which is so rare today that it can be astonishing to discover.

It takes many decades of hard work to learn how to design well which is why people who want a great house often hire an architect. Unfortunately, the skill of an architect varies greatly. Good luck with yours.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I would call it "French Inspired" which is not actually an architectural style but a convenient name for a collection of vaguely French design elements from many centuries.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

For general reference the French almost never used front facing gables in residential design except on the northern coast where buildings were influenced by the English.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Renovator8, I appreciate the fact that you sound well-educated and experienced. That is commendable. But, please step off of your pedastal when it comes to degrading the work of others and making assumptions of seasoned architects that you know very little about. This drawing is no where near to the point we plan to get it to before we begin digging. We are in the early states, which is why I started this thread looking for suggestions. I certatinly don't want you to take up any more of your time with my McMansion house. While I appreciate opinions and bouncing ideas off of others, I think this thread has got me second guessing wanting to be involved with this forum.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Same here.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Renovator8, just wanted to say I have learned a great deal from your forum postings and appreciate your contributions to this forum. I am sorry this thread turned a bit negative. I think GW is lucky to have an architect as a regular contributor.

Heather, I totally understand it is hard to hear anything negative about a project that you have put your heart and sole into. However, feedback (positive or negative) is one way to improve the outcome.

Good luck, Heather. Your house will be beautiful for sure!!

Carol


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Thank you Carol! I completely agree about taking positive and negative feedback. I've taken many of the suggestions on previous threads to heart and are currently making changes accordingly to our plan. I just don't understand it when people take a my way or the highway approach. Some architects can't see beyond the way that they would do it, thus it's hard to approve or relate to how someone else may see doing it. I'm learning more and more that building a house is like picking out a wedding dress or a baby name. It's better not to get opinions from everyone about everything or it's an endless circle. Rather than the historical aspect of how things were/should be, I'm focusing more on what we want our house to be and function above pleasing the masses. As long as we are all following what makes sense for our own families and our own eyes, I don't think you can go too wrong. So like I said, learned my lesson...


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

What frequently irks me about this forum is that some homeowners post their projects and ask for specific design advice but what they really want is approval for what has already been designed.

If you ask an architect how he would make a house design better you should expect to get a clear straight-forward answer without apology or praise for the existing design. That is how architects are trained and how architects make their living.

Wallyden was right; if you wanted a Craftsman-like house you didn't make that clear to your architect. The house is the antithisis of the Craftsman tradition.

This house could be really great if you approached design advice with an open mind. After all, you don't have to use the advice and it's free so why get snotty about it?


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I would suggest the linked book on Amazon as an extremely valuable visual tool for assisting you in your build. You don't get that it's about proportion and scale more than it is the jewelry gee gaws tacked onto a house. Giving a St. Bernard a shave job doesn't make him into a Standard Poodle. Taking the top off of a HumVee doesn't make it into a Ferrari convertable. Creating the appearance of open rafter tails and addingin some stained glass on a stairwell window does not make a home a Craftsman, or even Craftsmanesque. The bones matter.

The reason people study architecture and choose to build in certain styles is that those styles and master builders of the past have already done the hard work. They worked out the problems of proportion, scale, repetition, etc. Anyone trying to create something that does not fall within an historic style needs to understand those design issues and offer something new to the plate to solve them or else they are likely to be recreating mistakes from the past, not "improving" on the past design styles.

Additional suggested reading:

Some Place Like Home: Using Design Psychology to Create Ideal Places by Toby Israel

Shingle Style Architecture for the 21st Century [Hardcover] by E. Ashley Rooney

Shingle Styles. Innovation and tradition in American architecture, 1874 to 1982 by Bret Morgan and Leland M. Roth

A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction (Cess Center for Environmental) by Christopher Alexander, Sara Ishikawa and Murray Silverstein

The Not So Big House: A Blueprint for the Way We Really Live by Sarah Susanka and Kira Obolensky

Creating the Not So Big House: Insights and Ideas for the New American Home by Sarah Susanka and Grey Crawford

Designing Your Perfect House by William J. Hirsch Jr. AIA

What Your Contractor Can't Tell You: The Essential Guide to Building and Renovating by Amy Johnston

Here is a link that might be useful: What Not to Build


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

This drawing is no where near to the point we plan to get it to before we begin digging. We are in the early states, which is why I started this thread looking for suggestions.

But I thought you said you were breaking ground next month.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

The foundation is going in next month, yes. That doesn't mean the exterior is set in stone. Thanks for the input Renovator8, but like you said, you have other things you should be dealing with. You can be done with my house now.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I thought this forum was going to be my go-to website throughout this build. A place to walk the journey together. But, what I've come to realize is that seeking the approval of others who are total strangers on a place where anyone and everyone can sit behind a computer and voice opinions is not for me. Definitely not going to let this define my building process. Onto #1- more "free" time spent on things that are important in life, #2- more confidence in what we're doing is what WE are doing and that that's good enough, and #3- going on in joy for the gift it is to do what we are doing! Thanks to those of you who have offered advice! Good luck with all of your projects!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Your mistake was in seeking approval instead of honest advice. Come back when you understand the difference.

Everyone is welcome and no one has the right to dismiss anyone else.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I won't be coming back. I don't want to become one who lives on my computer and on forums.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Well, perhaps some future posters won't mind being educated about how to start thinking about architecture and building. Education is never wasting on the intellectually curious and those who want to improve their lives. It's always wasted on those who form their opinions and ideas first and look only for reinforcement of those opinions and ideas.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Renovator8 and Holly--I respect both of you immensely.

But, I feel like you both just ganged up on that girl and ran her off.

I never was very good at biting my tongue.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

The house she ends up with will be, sadly, as far from a Greene & Greene or a Robert A. M. Stern as possible.
It won't even be a Russel Versace!
Casey


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

IMHO = in my honest opinion

Given how this thread started, I was surprised when I got to the post on Sat, Aug 18, 12 at 9:59. Especially given the post it was in response to I found informative and constructive and not rude in any way. I became more and more surprised as I read on.

In my 9 years on this forum (sometimes super active, other times away for many months), I have seen so many valuable contributing architects offer their experience and advice for free and get run off by people who joined the forum 1 month ago, have posted 10 new threads asking questions only for themselves and their build, and never once contributing to anyone else. Renovator, you are a valued contributor and we do not want to see you run off !!

I think it would be a good idea if all new forum members were to read the first sentence of this FAQ *and* the italicized section that starts after the 4th paragraph ... http://ths.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/kitchbath/2011104457010237.html


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Here's my .02 :)

Building a house is emotional. Exposing the process to others is a vulnerable experience. Many have been in this process for years and it is not for the faint of heart. Hearing that something you felt you were so close to being done with has flaws is not easy. Especially if you are working with limited resources. And the limitations of the professionals whom you are working with.

In an ideal world I'd have beach front property in Bridge Hampton, $20 million budget, and Robert Stern as my architect. Alas twas not my fortune in life.

So I find the best resources I can based on my limitations. Knowing that I have these limitations I looked for input from a pool of people that I might otherwise not have an opportunity to glean from. GW in my opinion is the best source for this. What I have learned here has been INVALUABLE in my house building journey.

I could not count the mistakes I dodged if it were not for the advice of others. I do not know much about architecture....not my profession. So some things that I thought were A were in fact B. Once they were explained to me, even at the expense of my feelings, I was informed and aware now.

This board at times is a support group. It also at times is a gathering place of information. Sometimes its a place to curse out your builder or bank...lol. Like in business, don't take any of it personal. Try to appreciate all the opinions, decide which you would like to take, and keep things moving.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I also love the 1920's bungalows. We have many Tudor inspired as well as craftsman bungalows built in the 1920's in our area and they were a great inspiration to us. However, they are all 1800 square feet and without a garage! Trying to fit a modern (larger) floorplan with a 3 car garage into those elevations is very difficult. Some compromises had to be made for practicality, others for budget. I would have loved a slate roof, but sadly it wasn't in the budget. No one would mistake our home for a 1920's Tudor revival, but I hope it's evident that is where the inspiration comes from.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Don't skimp on the front door and use real wood when possible.

Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Same with the garage doors.

Photobucket

Renorvator8, I appreciate your comments. Very informative. HeatherK, I really do think what what Renovator is suggesting is that far off from you have right now. Good luck with your project.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Very nice Tudor adaptation.

One of the most common design oversights is not paying attention to the relative proportion of the upper and lower plans until it is too late to do anything but stack one on top of the other, put a giant hipped roof on it, and add some low front gables and a few eclectic elements.

To reduce the apparent scale of a house and allow it to emulate different styles it is usually necessary to make the upper floor smaller than the lower floor. Putting a bedroom on the first floor and attaching a garage helps but a 2 story living space and a garage attached by a link puts the house back in the stacked floor with a big hat syndrome.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Heather, if you're still reading these posts, please don't dismiss out of hand the advice to look into the shingle style house right away.
I definitely think that is a style you and your family could be forever happy with in your forever home.

Best of luck!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Well, perhaps some future posters won't mind being educated about how to start thinking about architecture and building. Education is never wasting on the intellectually curious and those who want to improve their lives. It's always wasted on those who form their opinions and ideas first and look only for reinforcement of those opinions and ideas.

I'm loving the education I'm getting. I've discarded so many plans, or aspects of plans, due to some new piece of information that those more knowledgeable than me have shared on these forums and I've seen the merit of their point. The end result is a better plan coming out of the design process and the very real prospect of my tangibly enjoying the improvements - these ideas and points have very real world effects.

So count me on the appreciative side with respect to all of the well articulated points that are made in threads like this.

For future posters, the points raised above about seeking validation, instead of improvement, for your plans are apropos


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

It's too bad this thread had to devolve into people getting angry and leaving rather than trying to learn something. I am a big fan of true Craftsman style, and it irks me when designers come up with 'Craftsman inspired' homes that in fact have nothing to do with the style, save a couple fat tapered columns stuck on an incongruously large house.

Our very small bungalow is going to be an attempt at a Craftsman style, at least on the exterior. I drive around old neighborhoods in a nearby city and snap pictures of true Craftsman-era homes to get a sense of proportion and scale. Being the deep south, most homes are pretty modest, and I would like to somewhat match what was built in this region.

That being said, we have to pay for the house, we have to live in it, and it has to meet modern standards for energy efficiency, etc., so I don't think we'll fool anyone.

I just wish that people who claim to want a particular style would do enough research to at least get the overall shape of the house right for the style they are hoping to achieve, and would at least listen to a skilled professional offering advice- for free, no less! I guess this thread has proven to be educational, albeit in a negative way.

Perhaps someday I will post my elevations for review, assuming I can get the courage up. Perhaps after a couple glasses of wine......


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

in case you do come back ... just wanted to show a possibility of window placement with the porch roof lowered ...

hope this helps :-)

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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Summerfield, it's a fine Colonial Revival with all the proper detailing. It would be perfect for an in-town home.

For a country home in the 4,000 s.f. range, unfortunately the Craftsman style won't work unless it is spread out and reduced in height but a more casual version of the Colonial Revival, the Shingle Style, can be dressed up or dressed down and adapted to almost any size house:

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Historically this kind of country house would probably have had natural red cedar shingles and green trim but it is on the southern coast of Maine where bleached white cedar shingles and white trim have found their way up from the Vinyard and Nantucket. In the end, the owner chooses.


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plan

In case you are interested here is the floor plan:

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In the end the pantry door moved into the kitchen, the gas stove became a gas fireplace, some high windows were added in the dining room, and the study windows were projected into a shallow rectangular bay.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

This is what I love. I don't know exactly WHAT you would call it. It screams craftsman to me, but it's not the normal craftsman I have seen (WHITE TRIM). I am now second guessing... We have used this pic as inspriation, and relied on our architect to render good advice. I sure hope he knows what he's doing!


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

The stone, shingled walls and natural wood structure are very much of the Craftsman tradition but the roof configuration and front facing gables are from different fashions entirely.

The roof forms are more of the neo-eclectic tradition: steep and complex with no dormers. The dominant front facing gables are neo-tudor and the decorative gable trusses are strongly reminiscent of the Victorian Stick Style (derived from the Gothic Revival) although they are so large and heavy that they would only appear to be appropriate in the mountains where large exposed rustic Post & Beam houses are always in fashion. (see the V3 Ranch link below) I was at a wedding there a few weeks ago.

Here is a link that might be useful: V3 Ranch Mountain house


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Renovator8 - Thanks for the great lesson. It is sad people are not willing to learn correct terms when designing a house and not willing to accept what it is. I respect your comments throughout the forum and thank you for all of it. Arguing with a bunch of untrained people like the poster and myself gets nowhere as we are ignorant in our knowledge and you have dedicated your life to the profession. People must learn to accept the truth though sometimes it hurts. Not sure why the original poster cant understand what a true craftsman house is.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Here is a link to a 2 story southern Arts & Crafts/Craftsman house that expands on the tradition in an elegant and tasteful way.

Here is a link that might be useful: Craftsman Style Home, Egypt, GA


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

I'm another appreciative lurker! Thank you all for the elevated and informative input.

Some folks would never dream of wearing sneakers with silk seamed stockings, a cotton button-down shirt and a tuxedo jacket, and top the whole ensemble with a horseracing cap -- yet they feel that it's perfectly swell to build an architectural version of the same thing.


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RE: Exterior detailing to spice things up?

Renovator8, you did nothing wrong on this thread. The OP took the same attitude in her original thread when posters commented negatively on her 2-story family room, with open loft and bridge to 2-story foyer. She did not get the approval she was seeking on that post either, and made similar comments to those she made here.


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