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What type of window is this????

Posted by emmachas (My Page) on
Fri, Mar 29, 13 at 17:38

Could some one please identify this window that swings out from the bottom? I have a few photos but have never seen one like it. Have been unable to locate one similar on window manufacturer websites......probably because I don't know what to call it. Many thanks in advance.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: What type of window is this????

Awning.


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RE: What type of window is this????

Thank you, olivesmom! I saw awning windows, but the examples shown were much, much shorter. I'm on the hunt again. Hope they open enough to allow egress but doubt it.


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RE: What type of window is this????

Yes, awning windows. At least one manufacturer makes these that fully open (kind of hard to explain but some pictures linked below) and advertises them for areas where access is otherwise restricted.

Here is a link that might be useful: Access windows


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RE: What type of window is this????

They are awning windows instead of access windows because the operating hardware is at the bottom. I can't be sure from the photo but they may be manually operated with manual rods for stops.


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RE: What type of window is this????

oaktown, thanks for the Loewen link. They were not even on my radar screen. The closest dealer is 275 miles away in Houston, but I will be there next month. There are several other window sizes on their site that I have had no luck locating locally. I will check them out in Houston.

Renovator, I hoped you would respond. I see what you are saying about the operating hardware. That is the best photo that I have. We are building a very traditional home that you usually see double or even triple hung windows in. I was trying to avoid the heavy operating bar that always winds up in the sight line. These looked like a good option if they allowed egress. I see that Marvin offers awning windows. I'll check them out.
Thank you all!!! Love this board..... never lets me down!


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RE: What type of window is this????

Awning windows will traditionally only open about 6 or 8" and will never meet egress code.


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RE: What type of window is this????

Renovator8, my understanding is that Loewen's access windows can be push-out or crank-out, if they are crank-out the operating hardware is on the bottom and there is a restrictor(? manual rod?) also on the bottom, but that can be unlatched to allow the window to pivot 180 degrees. In the Loewen window I looked saw, the restrictor(? manual rod?) was In the center bottom of the window, not on the side like the ones in the picture above. The Loewen rep described the access window as a souped-up awning window. Hope this terminology is ok.

emmachas, have fun window shopping! I was told that the Loewen access windows come in taller standard sizes than their awnings. I saw one in the showroom that definitely could be used for egress -- probably 3 people could climb out of it at the same time -- but that might have been a custom size.


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RE: What type of window is this????

If you need it for egress, and you don't like the "bar" in a double hung, but have that general shape; consider a casement too.

We just did casements to mimic double hungs (so I purposely put in the bar), but you can get full egress casements that are clear.


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RE: What type of window is this????

If the operating hardware is at the bottom, the window might not be able open far enough for it to be called an "access window" window or serve as a "emergency escape and rescue opening".

"Egress" is unfortunately the shorthand/generic term adopted by some window manufacturers to describe a window that meets the "Emergency Escape and Rescue Opening" required in all bedrooms and in basements without a bedroom even though no window can be a part of an code required "egress path". In residential building codes, an "egress path" must pass through 36" or wider corridors and stairways and at least one 36" or wider exterior door but cannot pass through a garage. Using the same term to mean two different things is not confusing to experienced designers but it can be for others.

In the photo no emergency escape and rescue window would be required and even if one was, the doors could serve as both an egress path and an escape opening.


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RE: What type of window is this????

Casement windows might be a better window type, if one desires wider opening potential for the windows. Awning type windows are fine for letting in fresh air, ventilation and keep light sprinkles out.

Your reference to "egress" is unclear. In the photo, as shown, the doors provide egress and since the room is on the first floor, no window egress is required. On the other hand, if these windows were located in the basement or upper floor bedroom, egress is mandatory and these windows appear to not meet that code requirement.


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RE: What type of window is this????

My slightly off-topic point was that no window can be a part of an "egress path" as defined by all national residential consensus codes (IRC R311) so the use of the term "egress" in a generic manner to refer to the "emergency escape and rescue opening" required in all "sleeping rooms" (IRC R310) is unnecessarily confusing and potentially misleading.

For "grade floor" sleeping rooms the required clear area of the escape opening is reduced from 5.7 s.f. to 5 s.f. with no change to the minimum dimensions.

As you would expect, I try very hard to avoid such unnecessary confusions and misunderstandings by using these terms as intended by the codes in spite of casual usage by others and hope they will learn to do so as well; just my free advice, you can take it or leave it.

Accuracy is important. I inadvertently used one manufacturer's term in a window schedule for windows from another manufacturer and it cost me $7,000.


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RE: What type of window is this????

Thank you all for taking the time to respond and being so helpful.
The windows would be in a master bedroom on the first floor. We intended to use fixed glass since French doors lead out to a porch. Now that we plan to glass in the porch as a sun room, there is no point of egress as required by code.
I had saved the original photo as an idea for windows for the sun room. When I noticed that the windows actually opened it was an 'A-ha' moment......I could use those in the bedroom. I posted here after a local window dealer had no clue what they were, and I could not find anything similar on line.
This funky photo is 20 yrs old but it shows the look I want minus the bar and with a transom. 6' windows, 2' transom. kirkhall and virgilcarter, thanks for the casement suggestion. Maybe a single 6' casement could work on each end......
I'll keep you posted. Thanks again!!!


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RE: What type of window is this????

In addition to the an egress path through doors and corridors, a grade level bedroom is required to have an emergency escape and rescue opening with a clear opening 5 s.f. , a min. height of 24" and a min. width of 20" and to be operable without the use of keys or tools. This can be achieved with a door or window that opens directly to the exterior from the bedroom without passing through another space.


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RE: What type of window is this????

If the window dealer you visited had no idea what an awning window was, I would very seriously find another window dealer and not step foot in his showroom again!


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RE: What type of window is this????

The only advantage I can think of for using a casement instead of a double-hung window is that they tend to have a better weather seal but they are more expensive and often less wide. Even if you want a 3 ft or narrower frame size, the random appearance of multiple open sash can look pretty odd from the outside, can obstruct decks and walkways, and can cause sound to bounce from one room into another if not carefully positioned.

I usually remove casements when renovating a house and the only casements I have added are the French casements that open like French doors with no post in the middle. I confess to a lifelong dislike for posts between pairs of casement windows especially over kitchen sinks.

Also, like awning windows, insect webs and other debris can collect between the screen and the sash on wooded sites and the interior screens aren't particularly attractive even when new. I want a window to look best from the inside where the owner will sees them up close.


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RE: What type of window is this????

Also, like awning windows, insect webs and other debris can collect between the screen and the sash on wooded sites and the interior screens aren't particularly attractive even when new. I want a window to look best from the inside where the owner will sees them up close.

The window screen is not a problem with inswing casement windows. But then again, I am partial to, and have, tilt and turn windows.


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RE: What type of window is this????

I haven't seen an inswing casement window except in Europe but I assume it would be a problem with curtains, blinds and furniture.

This post was edited by Renovator8 on Sun, Mar 31, 13 at 7:12


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RE: What type of window is this????

It is a problem with interior window treatments, also it just swings freely like a door unless you use the old fashioned casement stays.


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RE: What type of window is this????

The windows in the second photo are rather hard to identify, but they could be fixed uppers and operable lowers, such as hopper or awning types.

Choosing an appropriate type of window has a lot to do with the type of house one is designing. International School and Modern houses, for example, may have large amounts of glazing, alternating with large unbroken solid walls (the ying and yang of open and closed), while period houses may have the type of windows, sizes and spacing common during the period in which they were historically popular.

And of course, some houses of unknown historical style may have none of the above (or all of the above)!

The point is that one should be considering fenestration that is consistent with the architectural character and history of one's house.

That said, the windows in both photos help to create very inviting rooms. Hopefully they are consistent with the style of the house.


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RE: What type of window is this????

The OP said "This funky photo is 20 yrs old but it shows the look I want minus the bar and with a transom. 6' windows, 2' transom."

A water view is primarily a horizontal view so I would use wide double-hungs.


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RE: What type of window is this????

If you look around you may even find windows that combine an awning and a casement.

No odea what brand they are, but afriend has tem in his house for nearly every window.

In awning mode they open about 12 inches.
In casement mode past 90 degrees.

To switch modes you close the window completely and move a slide on one side up and down.


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RE: What type of window is this????

Tilt turn windows (mentioned by dekeoboe above) combine the awning and casement mode and are manufactured by a number of firms. I think these are more common in Europe.

I had one of these years ago when I lived in Germany - the window was at ground level and I still remember hearing hedgehogs gnawing at the sill.

Claire


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RE: What type of window is this????

Tilt turn windows (mentioned by dekeoboe above) combine the awning and casement mode and are manufactured by a number of firms.

Not quite, tilt and turn windows work as a hopper and a casement. In the tilt position, the window opens in at the top with hinges at the bottom. In the turn position, the window is an inswing casement

This post was edited by dekeoboe on Mon, Apr 1, 13 at 19:42


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RE: What type of window is this????

  • Posted by claire z6b Coastal MA (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 2, 13 at 10:35

This site shows how the tilt and turn windows currently available work (at least the ones I see on a google search). dekeoboe is correct, these work as a hopper and a casement.

The tilt and turn window I had in Germany was hinged at the top and on the side, so that it opened like an awning.

Claire

This post was edited by claire on Tue, Apr 2, 13 at 10:38


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RE: What type of window is this????

The tilt and turn window I had in Germany was hinged at the top and on the side, so that it opened like an awning.

So it was an outswing casement? I haven't seen those type before. The ones we had in Belgium worked like the ones we have now.


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RE: What type of window is this????

This was many years ago and I never opened the window as a casement. I do remember (95% sure) that the awning opened outwards; there was a curtain inside that could be drawn while the window was open to let the cats outside.

Perhaps the window was installed upside down, but the hinge was definitely on the top.

Claire


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RE: What type of window is this????

For the life of me, I can't see how this window issue happened or what's so confusing about the options to resolve the concerns.

Obviously, this could have been avoided in the design stages, or even in early construction, but that time has come and gone. With construction in place, there are real limitations on what can be practially and economically done at this point.

There's a fixed head height available for the windows. There's a sill height, below which special (tempered) glazing is required, and so to be avoided. In other words, there's a maximum and minimum dimension for all windows.

If you can't visualize it, just cut some brown wrapping paper and tape various size pieces in place until you have something satisfactory.

It's really not rocket science!


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RE: What type of window is this????

Just pointing out the obvious: This window will not allow breezes to blow through the house.


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