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Water in basement thru main and sump holes

Posted by GilligansIsland (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 21, 11 at 8:00

Our house is nearly done, however we had heavy rains last night and now there is water coming in thru the mains water and sump pump piping going out the poured concrete basement walls. We had the lot graded in the fall, but it's obvious the water is running towards the foundation.

Since both the lines running in/out of walls are leaking, is it possible this wasn't sealed properly? Builder is coming out today to have a look, but I just want to be prepared for the solution. I've read various solutions already, some 70% say fix from inside, others strongly suggest to fix from outside. I'd hate to agree to just filling the holes from the inside if it's just a temporary fix.

It doesn't appear the holes were filled from the inside to begin with. There is a gap between the PVC piping and concrete holes that were drilled in the walls. The water is running (continually flowing) clear with no soil or sand in mix. You can put your fingers in the wall, but not far enough to see if the outside is even sealed. Thank you!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

Do you have footer drains installed and working?

That is the first line of defense in getting a dry basement.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

Hi, yes! The sump was running about every 5-10 minutes as well. They sealed walls with a black substance (tar?), supposedly backfilled with gravel and also inside is drylocked?


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

Our builder never showed up. It's 2pm. I had to call the excavators myself. They will be here in 45 minutes.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

Why is the sump for footer drains even in the basement?

It should be outside in a pit.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

I also have the sump pit in the basement, not outside.
This was a requirement from the structural engineer. He mostly cared about hydrostatic pressure damaging the walls with a flooded basement being the preferred worst case outcome should the pumps fail.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

I'm really nervous about this and what could happen in the future with leaks/damage.

The builder said the plumber didn't seal the inside at all and he is at fault. Builder CLAIMS the outside was sealed by the excavators. Our builder put drylock and a plastic membrane on basement walls, so why didn't he call the plumber up to have him properly seal the holes? I don't get this.

The plumber came out and sealed with hydrocement.

Do I need to have them check the outside as well? I'm worried this is a temp fix since the water penetrated from the outside, so obviously something is wrong there?


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

"This was a requirement from the structural engineer. He mostly cared about hydrostatic pressure damaging the walls with a flooded basement being the preferred worst case outcome should the pumps fail."

You may also need a sump pump in the basement, but leading the footer drains in is just asking for a flood when the pump fails.

If the water is already outside, why bring it in?

If you must bring the footer drains in seal their pit and install another that is open for water that has already made it into the basement.

No one ever drilled holes in a boat to keep water out.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

i like turdles


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

The plumbing codes require that when a pipe goes through a masonry wall the pipe MUST BE SLEEVED.

To make a code approved sleeve they first put in a short section of pipe at least two nominal trade sizes larger than the desired pipe and extending at least 1" out on either side of the wall. (The sleeve may be inserted in the forms when the concrete is poured). In some jurisdictions they will permit just drilling a hole through the concrete, providing the ID of the hole is equal to the ID of a pipe two nominal trade sizes larger than the desired pipe.

After the desired pipe is put through the sleeve the Plumber is required to seal the space between the exterior of the desired pipe and the interior of the sleeve with either a tar or pitch based material or expansion foam.

Under no circumstances may cement, concrete or other masonry material be in direct contact with the desired pipe.

Te reasoning behind this code regulation is simple. In the case of metalic pipe such as Galvanized or Black iron pipe or cast iron pipe the lime in the concrete will react with the metal causing a premature failure of the pipe at that point.

Plastic pipes such as PVC or ABS are impervious to the lime, but platic pipe expands & contracts rather quickly by temperature changes. As hot or cold water alternately flows through the pipe it will cause very minute changes in the overall length and diameter of the pipe where it is encased in concrete and that slight movement causes excessive wear on the pipe wall, again leading to premature failure or leaks around the pipe wall from the exterior.

The tar, pitch or expansion foam will remain flexible, allowing for changes in the pipe dimension without causing a leak or abraiding the pipe walls.

I would call that plumber back and tell them to remove that hydrailic cement mess and do the job in the manner as prescribed by code.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

"If the water is already outside, why bring it in?"

Totally agree. How does one manage that? Can one have a sump pump outside the house? Water is below grade - near the footings, it has to be pumped up and away?

Thanks.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

"Can one have a sump pump outside the house? Water is below grade - near the footings, it has to be pumped up and away? "

The sump pump is placed in a pit outside the basement that is as deep as needed and the discharge routed as needed.


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RE: Water in basement thru main and sump holes

Placing the sump in a pit outside might work fine in your region, but here is New England were we are subject to prolonged sub-zero temps and upwards of 48" frost lines we have to put the pump in the basement,otherwise the sump and pump would freeze and be useless.


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