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Any experience with Kerlite?

Posted by palimpsest (My Page) on
Sat, Oct 1, 11 at 21:25

I am interested in Kerlite tiles. They are a thin, very large format porcelain tile from Italy.

The two most common formats are 39x39 and 39x117 in a 3mm thickness/ a 3.5mm thickness that adds a mesh backing, and "Twin", a 7mm thickness. It's light and slightly flexible.

The large format size means to me, for example, that the entire entry area or an entire powder room of my next house could be paved in one tile. This would be appropriate because it is a 1960s modernist-brutalist house.

So, I have been wondering if anyone has actually used it.

Here is a link that might be useful: Kerlite


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Any experience with Kerlite?

I have seen it. I have purchased it. I have not installed it.


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RE: Any experience with Kerlite?

What do you think of it, uninstalled? Do you mean it hasn't been installed *yet, or it was installed by someone else on a different project? Which format have you purchased?


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RE: Any experience with Kerlite?

This is a game changer in my opinion. A huge new market. My prediction is this will expand the market for porcelain. It elegantly covers a wall or a floor without making you grout tile spaces. I think that Kerlite will be great for backsplashes and tub surrounds. Maybe countertops too. It will also be bought by those who want to redo their tile floors since you can overlay it without raising the floor by much, and without ripping out old tile. In some cases it can replace gypsum drywall (sheetrock). It comes in huge sizes so you can do a wall in 1 or 2 pieces in many bathrooms. Good for those who want to have something of higher standing than (basic boring) plaster walls. You can't do a wall in rectified tile without spending a lot of time (money) and without buying a lot of stuff too. A single large sheet just makes so much more sense. It's solid but without the extreme rigidity of tile, and without the big thermal mass too. Heat cables in the thinset will have less mass to warm up.

It costs very little when you realize you don't have finicky tile setting to do and you don't have to come back and grout. I bought a piece 40cm long. It's the thin (3mm) one. Incredibly strong. I'm thinking I'll cut it into strips, e.g. for windowsills and baseboards (+ could be heated with heat cable thinset). I might have wanted the 2.5m long stuff as a kitchen backsplash. But I went with thin glass tiles. Lots of time, and lots of money in setting compounds, primer, groutboost, etc.

www.kerlite.it Kerlite is only 3mm thick. Extruded not pressed, according to the saleslady who said it was pure porcelain (not a composite). It has some bend-ability. I paid less than $100 for my piece.


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RE: Any experience with Kerlite?

Theoretically the floors in the powder room and the entry hall of my house could be done with one tile each, the kitchen with two, although it would probably take three for the kitchen.


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