Return to the Bathrooms Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Posted by breezygirl (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 11, 11 at 14:58

I can't decide b/w tile or a solid surface base in the shower. I'd like cast iron, but I can't find the size I need so I'm back to considering tile. DH says he'd prefer not to have tile, but he may just have to lump it. ;)

Do you wish you hadn't tiled your floor?


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

i know people who regretted not tiling. None of the other type (regret tiling).


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I didn't do it, but I have a tiled shower now. I won't do a tiled shower floor again if the choice is mine. It's hard to keep clean--maybe if I scrubbed it daily it wouldn't get grungy, maybe if I wore shoes outdoors, maybe maybe.

It's more maintenance. Not an issue for some, but I'd rather skip it.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

The shower in our master bath has a tiled floor, and I find it MUCH easier to keep looking good that the floor in the fiberglass shower in the kids' bath - and we are practically empty nesters now. The only one who uses that bath is our son when he is home from college.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

We were going to do a an acrylic or fiberglass pan for our hall bath, but our shower is a non-standard size so we ended up tiling. We haven't moved into the house yet so we've yet to use the shower, but from an aesthetic point of view I'm glad we tiled.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

My shower area is 71.25" long and can be up to 38" deep front to back. We have been considering half wall along part of the shower too.

The cast iron shower pans I've seen are only 30" deep. I could put a 4" thick half wall if I did that, but 30" seems kinda narrow when you're showering. There is a standard sized Tile-redi pan that's 37" x 72". My plumber says he could make the that one work, but there would be no half wall space.

I didn't really want an acrylic pan.

So I need to decide:

Half wall or not?
Cast iron shallow pan or tile pan?


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Well, I HAVE had fiberglass and that was worse than tile. No argument there!


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I was going to do a custom corian base similar to kgwlisa (see link) but ended up going with a tile floor and still regret it.

Here is a link that might be useful: solid surface/ tile wall thread


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Tiled shower floors are the ultimate, without question. You want a "Chain Gang or Trailer Park" type floor? Go with a precast pan.

A good tiled floor with a good quality grout, like Spectralock will last indefinately and give you a quality look....as long as you use a Pro to put it in...(or do it right yourself)


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

We have the same hex marble tiles on the bathroom floor and in the shower. Very happy with it. I do make an effort to squeegee the glass walls each time, and run the fan, and also usually wipe out the shower to minimize how much moisture stays on the shower floor. Worth it to me to do this-- I really like the shower.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

fori, get a steamer. The lowest cost steamer. It does wonders on grout lines. That and a drop of bleach if really needed. Every six months.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

You want a "Chain Gang or Trailer Park" type floor? Go with a precast pan.

The cast iron pan in our guest bathroom looks neither "chain gang" nor "trailer park." Is it as luxe as a stone tile floor that matches the travertine floor in the rest of the bathroom? Probably not. Does it look cheap though? Not IMHO....

Shower Stall

Doorway shot


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Check out MTI shower bases. I just bought one. It is an acrylic base 48x42. I could not find this size anywhere else. For months and months I have been going through this same debate and in the end grout maintenance ruled out. There are loads of tile lovers out there though and that's great but, me and my back are looking forward to a no grout floor.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

A year ago when I started picking plumbing fixtures I got a quote for an MTI acrylic base. It was almost $900. My GC at the time said I could do a tile pan and tile for less than that so I started to head that direcion.

I'm so glad to know I'm not the only one who debates these issues for months on end! Yours isn't usable yet is it? Curious to know how you like it. Thanks!


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

a steamer works wonders on grout. No soap, no detergent, just steam from a nozzle. A drop of bleach once every 6 months if someone wants it even whiter that white.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

In our last master bath, we had 1" octagon tiles (mosaic on mesh) in tumbled ming green marble with an enhancing sealer to make them a little darker. (We also had a ming listello stripe on the wall to jazz up the Lowes field tiles.) The small tiles felt good under our feet and were very slip resistant. I would not put a polished stone or shiny porcelain tile on the shower floor. We never had a problem with keeping the floor nice looking, but it probably helped that neither the tile nor the grout was white.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Davidro--thanks for the steamer suggestion.

Kay--Thank for weighing in. I will remember to NOT use white grout!


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Breezy-

I'll also add another recommendation: use epoxy grout. I used it on the floor (not the shower floor) in my daughter's bathroom and it's awesome. Totally bulletproof.
My master bath has a marble mosaic floor with regular grout. Per our very knowledgeable installer (BillV.) we did NOT seal the floor (because of the marble's porosity over traditional mud bed) and therefore the grout is not that easy to keep clean. Not bad, but not perfect. It's grey grout, so that definitely helps. Nonetheless I LOVE the look and the feel of a mosaic tiled floor in the shower.
In my next house, I'll probably have a tiled shower but I'll definitely use epoxy grout next time. It's a little different to work with (your installer might complain if you're not DIY-ing it, but as a competent DIY-er I found it easy... just different) but well worth it.

Also, I read your other thread in kitchens and I wanted to add, make sure you do heated floors (I think you're planning to, right? They're SO wonderful!). And make sure you make enough niches in the shower. It is such a luxury to have all the bottles and soap and razors stashed away, out of sight, not on windowsills or ledges or the shower floor.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Hi Stacy.

Thanks for the tip. I don't think we'll be DIYing the tile this time, but you never know. The budget might be too tight in the end. I love mosaic floors, or mosaiced anything really. Have you posted pics of that floor before? I know I've seen your daughter's bathroom. Yes, heated floors! I cannot wait! And yes to the niches too. DH poo-poo'd them the other night, but I told him he'd get used to them.

Oh, and a little ledge for shaving my legs!


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

IMHO, 30" deep is way too shallow for a shower when you have the space for a deeper one. That was the size of our previous shower, and my husband occasionally hit his elbows when he raised his arms, and when we were showering a child, the door would get pushed open (only a problem if you have little bitty ones). I had all the materials bought to rip it out and steal 3" from the room to make it bigger when we decided to sell and build. Those 3" were important enough to me to go to the trouble and expense of redoing the shower pan.
Like I said, just my opinion...


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Arcylic for me...hands down. Been there done that with tiled floors.


 o
edit

A good arcylic base is not cheap by the way, rather pricey. But they last forever, remain clean, shiney, easy to clean, and they can be restored if abused.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

We have black pebbles with black epoxy grout in our shower. We will never have anything else. not a single complaint and cleaning consists of spray and a quick brushing.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

My Kohler cast iron shower receptor is 36x 60. It is gorgeous and luxurious with my marble subways and frameless door. I would never consider tile on the floor.

Image and video hosting by TinyPic


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

We've had experience with just about all the options already mentioned and I've listed my observations below. Keep in mind that we have a farm and DH gets very dirty working on it in addition to his regular job:

Fiberglass--Absolute pain in the rear to clean. Just cleaned again the other night & had to use 3 different cleansers (one after the other with thorough rinses in between) to get it sparkling. Also, at least with ours, if you don't get it sparkling clean, it has a sticky residue that your feet cling to. Several builders tried to talk us into those fiberglass inserts for our boys' baths--no way, no how! No more fiberglass for me!

Cast Iron--Great feel, easy install but the non-slip texture they put on it holds onto dirt like you can't believe. I've only found 1 product that will clean it thoroughly--Bar Keepers Friend--but you still have to scrub & scrub & scrub.

Concrete(experienced over 10 days in a rented beach condo)-- Interesting texture (light broom finish I think), but still slippery. Not sure if it was stained the dark gray color it was or if it was painted--paint would contribute to the slipperiness I guess. Didn't give it a thorough cleaning so can't really comment on that aspect.

Tile--small basket weave design with beige/off-white grout. The trick is to make sure the tile & grout are the same height--grout isn't 1 or 2mm lower than the tile. That helps prevent water from gathering and sitting in those depressed grout areas. Also, squeegee the floor after you've squeegeed the walls. That takes care of most of the issues if any standing water droplets have dirt in them. Dirt does sometimes show on the grout lines but not as difficult to remove as the other shower base materials we've tried. Needless to say, we're going with tile in the new house.

Stone/Corian--We've not experienced these first hand, but we have seen them at the annual home show. They are beautiful & seem to be very easy to install, but I do worry about slipping.

Good luck, Breezy & let us know what you decide!


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I've been meaning to come back and let you know what we decided--tile floor! I ordered a custom tile-ready shower base from KBRS based on the recommendation from someone on the Kitchen Forum. The tile pans I'd seen online until then were pre-fab sizes that just didn't quite work.

KBRS can do whatever size and curb/thresholds you want. We decided to do a pony wall with glass above for a good section of the shower beside the toilet so we are having that section of the KBRS pan made with just the flange, no curb. Then we put the curb where we wanted it for the frameless glass door. The cost was barely more than the Tile-Redi pan that wasn't the right size and had a curb all along the front.

The pan should arrive towards the end of next week. I'll let you know what it looks like when it gets here. But I don't really know how to judge the quality of it just by looking it as I've never seen a tile pan before. ;)

Thanks so much everyone!


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I'm new to shower land, just had to pull my old one out...
Surprised by the cast iron shower choice. I've had a cast iron white sink in my kitchen for 20 years. I've loved it, but don't think I would do it again. I'm into lower maintenance now -- must be middle age thing. I also made the mistake of using cleaners with bleach for the past few years, which is probably why it stains easily now.

But shower floor -- no idea -- going through the same thing. Why don't people choose corian? I was told this surface is tough enough you can use bleach on it (meaning it will last and look good), plus, no grout, seems more durable and easier to clean, doesn't it?

And the tile walls, to the poster that uses bleach now and then: if you use bleach on the grout, I'm told it erodes the grout. Yes/No?

I know you want answers, but I have only questions...

and curious of those that posted answers as to how long their shower has been installed? I don't want to have to do this again, so I intend to replace everything at this point, but is it possible to put in a shower to last and look good for a lifetime?


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Regret it? Yep, my neighbor does. She had about the most incompetent company ever for her bath reno and her tiled shower pan meanders up and down with lots of spots that are lower than the drain area, so now she not only has to squeegee the glass but also mop up the floor every time she takes a shower.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

We had penny tile under foot in our last shower and enjoyed them. Did NOT enjoy the white grout. We are using penny again, but with a darker grout.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I didn't regret tiling ANYONE'S shower floor!! :-)


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

We have a tile floor for the first time after our bathroom remodel. It's honed travertine 2 x 2 with an off white grout. I am really enjoying it. It doesn't show any dirt at all because of it's varied color and it's very secure feeling, not slippery at all. I had a prefab shower pan before some sort of vinyl or fiberglass. It was hard to keep clean. Scrubbing is scrubbing not sure I understand the diss on tile because we had to clean any surface we ever had by scrubbing. This is the least scrubbing surface ever for us! I guess it depends on the color and type.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

kaysd, I am planning to use ming green marble too. Do you have any pic.s of your finished bathroom? I would love to see them. Are you happy with the way the green marble looks?


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I sure do regret tiling the floor of our new shower. Yes, it was gorgeous when finished. However, in less than three months, we've had to let the grout dry out for three weeks and reseal it. I knew I should have gone with a prefab pan but let the contractor talk me out of it. Big mistake.

The problem is that grout sealer won't stand up to even moderate scrubbing or harsh cleaners. Once it has been compromised, the grout and the mortar substrate get wet. It simply won't stand up to everyday life.

Luckily, we had acrylic put in the grout so it can be removed. If we have more trouble, I'll have it removed and put in epoxy grout. That should solve the problem.

bk


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I sure do regret tiling the floor of our new shower. Yes, it was gorgeous when finished. However, in less than three months, we've had to let the grout dry out for three weeks and reseal it. I knew I should have gone with a prefab pan but let the contractor talk me out of it. Big mistake.

The problem is that grout sealer won't stand up to even moderate scrubbing or harsh cleaners. Once it has been compromised, the grout and the mortar substrate get wet. It simply won't stand up to everyday life.

Luckily, we had acrylic put in the grout so it can be removed. If we have more trouble, I'll have it removed and put in epoxy grout. That should solve the problem.

bk


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Does anyone have river rock in their shower? I've seen it in a show room and loved it, but wonder about cleaning it. Seems like lots of grout in between round or oval stones.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

We did not do riverrock (I thought about the cleaning part too, and I would be worried about inconsistent porosity... founded or unfounded worry).

But, we did do round tiles... And, I love them. They do feel good on my feet. And, they are porcelain, so I feel like I got the best of both worlds...

I took this picture for another poster to show the drain. But you can see our grout/tile floor.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Lots of good info here - thanks,


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Had a textured acrylic pan in the last house. It was a horror! No matter how much soaking in bleach cleaner and hand-and-knees scrubbing, it never really looked clean. Now I have tile. I spray with cleaner, let sit for awhile and rinse out, don't have to scrub. Everything is clean.

This post was edited by canuckplayer on Sat, Mar 15, 14 at 18:54


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Just tile it. No one lives forever......


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

@Breezy

Tiling is really the best choice, if it's done with the right tile and the right grout on the right kind of sub-surface.

Glazed tile has a glassy face. Very easy to keep clean. But, the historical problem with glazed tile is that between the tiles you had grout.

Grout was cement, porous, impossible to keep clean, easy to stain, and a safe harbor for mold and mildew. Once established, mild and mildew in tile grout seem about impossible to eradicate -- you just learn to live with it -- beating it back every once in a while with the latest, greatest mildew killer -- none of which actually works for long.

The second great problem with tile showers was the shower pan. This is the floor of the shower. It has to slope from all directions to a drain. Traditionally they are made of concrete by a very experienced (and very expensive) expert concrete man. Even then, they were seldom perfectly even, so you got puddles on your floor where the water did not quite drain.

The third problem with tile showers was the backer board on the walls. In the '50s and '60s' it was water-resistant dry wall, which fell apart after about 20 years -- not actually all that water resistant. The next step was cement backer board. Better, but cement is not actually waterproof. It fact, it's hydroscopic, like a sponge and will absorb water -- although slowly. Put one end of a concrete block in a puddle of water and within a day or so it will have wicked water to all parts of the block

As a shower backer the theory is that while it may absorb water while the shower is on, it will then dry when the shower is turned off, and since cement is not harmed by water, it does no harm to get it wet temporarily. But, what if, for whatever reason, it does not dry out? Then you have another great breeding ground for mold and mildew. So, not a 100% satisfactory solution.

So we don't do any of this today -- haven't for 20 years, although there are still remodelers out there who use the old technologies.

The first thing we do is replace the concrete shower pan with a factory molded, dead even, foam shower pan. This does not sound very sturdy, does it? But this particular foam is so dense that it is used to make truck ramps, and will withstand pressures of 200-300 lbs per square foot (since your floor is likely rated for no more than 100 psf, this is more than enough).

Next, we get rid of the cement board and replace it with standard drywall. But, over the drywall we are going to adhere a water proof membrane. Water proof -- no water gets through it, so the drywall behind the membrane cannot get wet, and the membrane itself does not absorb water. So, no possibility of mold or damage to the surrounding walls from water.

Now we are ready to set the tile, and once that's done we need to grout. We have not used cement-based grout for many years now. There is a new product ("new" by construction standards meaning anything newer than 30 years old) grout based on urethane plastic. Non porous, flexible, does not crack, loosen, stain, harbor dirt, or shelter mildew. As easy to clean as the glazed tile itself.

And, there you have it, the very low maintenance tile shower in any of about 500,000 colors and patterns, in any size or shape you might want.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Barbie, I am installing this same shower pan. I have also considered marble subway tile but am scared about maintenance ---- how has that worked out for you? Do you ever regret the marble or wish you had used a faux marble?


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

I am not barbie, but my name is Barbara ;) I am installing a Kohler pan (in place already) and porcelain marble look alike. I am so very happy I went with the porcelain as it looks great and there will not be any risk of rust spots or water absorption, like there is with marble. The printing process on tile is wonderful these days. here is my partially done shower.
 photo tilemarch_zps67453dbc.jpg

The shower pan is not visible but it is a 36x60" Salient from Kohler in Ice grey.


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

Enduring (aka Barbara), I am a fan of your incredible work! What is the name and maker of your tile?


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

This is Atlas Concorde, Marvel line, in the Calacatta Extra color. It is a matt finish. I believe I also saw the polished finish and it looked great too.

This is an Italian tile I found at RBC, which is in the midwest. I ordered it through Nebraska Furniture Mart. It is not their regular line but they are retailers for the RBC tile people and so they could get it for me through the RBC account (or something like that).

Here is a link that might be useful: Atlas Concorde, Marvel, Calacatta Extra


 o
RE: Anybody regret tiling their shower floor?

And what are you doing with the rest of your bathroom? Floor? Countertops?

I am trying to design a similar bathroom, was originally going for a charcoal slate like floor but am now considering putting the faux marble on the floor as well to brighten the space. As of today, I am planning on carrara countertops but sometimes think I should use jet mist honed for durability. My bathroom only has a sliver of a window in the shower which faces northwest so the room is rather dark.

Locally, I have found at Lowes a faux marble by American Olean Mooreland Carrara Wall Tile and, at a design house, Mediterranea Marmol at almost twice the price. I am so frustrated.....


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Bathrooms Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here