Return to the Bathrooms Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Tile vs solid surface shower floor

Posted by dancingqueen (My Page) on
Fri, Feb 17, 12 at 21:10

We are starting to work on plans for our master bath remodel. We currently have a tiled shower floor that will be removed in order to create a larger shower. The walls will be tiled, probably in porcelain and preferably in rectified tile for smaller grout lines. Is a solid surface shower floor better than another tiled floor? I believe I can have solid surface made to the size of the new shower. Are they easier to slip on since they do not have grout? I just want to do whatever is easier and least likely to leak as long as it does not compromise the safety. TIA


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Tile vs solid surface shower floor

Well, a solid surface showerpan is the least likely to leak, but when you start going into custom or very large sizes, you may lose the savings factor.

A lot depends on your local labor market. We live in a very high-cost labor area so tile becomes one of the most expensive surfaces to install for large or complex (design-wise) showers.

A properly installed tiled shower floor shouldn't leak, but of course, the key words are "properly installed". Really good work is never cheap.

With solid surface, the installers just have to measure correctly and have enough hands to carry the pan in. It took three men to bring in a cultured granite 42" neo-angle showerpan!


 o
RE: Tile vs solid surface shower floor

dancingqueen: "Is a solid surface shower floor better than another tiled floor? I believe I can have solid surface made to the size of the new shower. Are they easier to slip on since they do not have grout?

There are two questions inside your single question: (1) what is the best substrate, and (2) what is the best shower floor.

Underneath the floor that your feet will be touching is a pan of some sort -- in older homes, a sheet of (usually) lead; in newer installations, usually a layer of plastic of some sort. Those are seamless and (for all intents and purposes) impermeable. If they will leak, they will leak at the margins only.

On top of the substrate is the layer that your feet will touch. When we re-did our shower a few years back, we put a layer of liquid sealant (a Laticrete product used in swimming pool installations) on the substrate, then applied some nonslip, rough-surfaced, Korean made 4" square porcelain tiles atop it with epoxy grout between the tiles. Completely waterproof, and as nonslip as one is likely to get in a shower.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Bathrooms Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here