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Wallmate on basement walls question

Posted by andrelaplume2 (My Page) on
Tue, Sep 23, 08 at 16:05

I have found a Wallmate like product at HD and it will work perfectly in part of my basement. It appears a 1.5" furring strip holds the ends and a 3" strip joins two pieces in the middle.

I assume one uses the blue 1/4 tapcom screws. I am predrilling then screwing them in. I have no hammer drill. My question is, how many screws are used per 7.5' tall furring strip? The screws will go thru 1.5 inches of material. How long of a screw should I use? It will be safe to attach the drywall at 2 foot intervals right...I was not planning on using any adhesive anywhere.

Finally, I assume one would cut the fur strip 2" above the floor height in case of water in the basement...

I can not think of any drawbacks to using this system; at least in the are I am using it. I will have no outlets and a good portion will actually be in a closet. My only real concern is how plum the wall be I guess.

Any other instalation tips would be appreciated. I hope this works...I'd hate to see mold somehow creeping thru my drywall in a few years!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

I wonder what product that is--perhaps EPS, but that will work too.

Tapcon is a brand of concrete screw. Some store brands hold as well and are cheaper. But you must use a hammer drill. You can buy a satisfactory corded drill for less than $100, e.g. The screw should be at least 1 1/4" longer than the material you're going through. A 3/16" diameter is all you need. You're just holding drywall. Three screws per length would be enough. (The sheer strength of a 2-3/4" long 3/16" diameter Tapcon is 1,124 lb.; pullout is 1,075 lbs.) I'd use a Phillips head, so there will be no interference with the drywall that's going right on top.

Put the foam to the floor, but keep the firring above it.


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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

RE:
I wonder what product that is--perhaps EPS, but that will work too.

It is EPS. No fancy Wallmate name, Just pinkpanther brand 1&1/2" pink XPS, R7.5, 2 X 2 X 8 sheets with the ends notched to except 3" furring strips. Like the Wallmate brand by DOW the fur strips overlap 2 XPS panels and hold them in place. This is where the TapCom screws come in. (I wll look for store brans then because those TapCons cost a fortune) Essentially, from what I can see, the tap com screw (or similar) must go through the fur strip, thru the XPS and into the concrete to both hold the XPS in place AND provide something to screw the drywall into. You concur right?

So I need a 3/16 or 1/4 tapcon (or similar) screw that needs to go thru 1.5" of fur/xps...so I should use a 2&3/4 tapcon? I would think a 1&1/4" drywall screw would be used for 3/8 drywall right? I really hope those suckers hold eveything together and screwing the very ends of the drywall and only the middle is effective.

I guess I should ask, what is the difference between a hammer drill and my reglar corded drill?

Tapcon is a brand of concrete screw. Some store brands hold as well and are cheaper. But you must use a hammer drill. You can buy a satisfactory corded drill for less than $100, e.g. The screw should be at least 1 1/4" longer than the material you're going through. A 3/16" diameter is all you need. You're just holding drywall. Three screws per length would be enough. (The sheer strength of a 2-3/4" long 3/16" diameter Tapcon is 1,124 lb.; pullout is 1,075 lbs.) I'd use a Phillips head, so there will be no interference with the drywall that's going right on top.

Put the foam to the floor, but keep the firring above it.


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RE: Wallmate Observation

along with my questions from the prior post...
On the dow site they say you can use a 1x3 fur strip which sits flush with the xps. Then mount the drywall, ie the drywall rests flush against the xps and fur strips...if securing the drywall only on its ends and middle is sufficient, this sound sturdy in an area with kids banging into the drywall...or in a closet. Are you sure there is no chance of anything permiating thru the 1.5" of XPS and creating mold on the drywall though.....?

Dow also says you can use 2" thick fur strips thus leaving a pocket of air between the xps and drywall for electrical.

What do you think of this...sounds like 2' of drywall with no support in back of it that could break if a child banged into it?

For the area I am XPSing (8 linear feet at the base of my stairs followed by 10 linear feet in a closet) I do not think I will need any electrical outlets....unless code requires them....so I was going to go with the dow flush mount method. Other area where I know I need elecrical will be framed out in front of 1/2 non slotted XPS.

Anyone have any tips on how to keep things up to code. It would seem if you use the flush method and later need to add an outlet you are stuck....I want to be safe and up to code. I do not want the township popping in and out every week over the next couple of years while I get all this done. (we are on a budget, one that was just extended when I decided it best to use the XPS!)...I want everything done right.....hense my decision to use XPS in the first place.

Decisions...decisions....


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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

Are you sure there is no chance of anything permiating thru the 1.5" of XPS and creating mold on the drywall though.....?

Use a dehumidifier to keep summer humidity below 50%.

2' of drywall with no support in back of it that could break if a child banged into it?

That is the "advanced framing" technique touted by Building Science and the US Dept. of Energy's Building America Program. I still prefer 16" o.c.

If you need wiring later, you can always surface mount it safely.

You should be aware that 90% of American communities adhere to the ICCs 2006 International Residential Code for One- and Two-Story Dwellings requiring basements that contain habitable spaces used for living, sleeping, eating, or cooking have emergency egress and rescue exits meeting certain standards for height, width etc.


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Followup

Length of screw: The screw should be at least 1 1/4" longer than the material you're going through. That's right from Tapcon's specs.

Hammer drill vs. non-hammer drill. Night and day difference in their ability to punch a hole in concrete.


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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

I do have a bilco door for egress. I essentially have an L shaped basement. Imagine the square portion as about 27 X 24, the remainder is 13 X 20...the missing piece is where the garage is. The 13 X 20 will done at a later time.

I plan on walling off the area around the bilco door (12 X 12) or so for storage and a small work room...I think I will use a 4' bifold in case I ever need to get something in thru the bilco and into our finished space.

I think I now have a plan that will use 1.5" slotted XPS along part of one wall and closet. This should save me some space at athe foor of the stairs. The r value should end up around 9 or so for that 18 feet of wall/closet space. I will use 1/2" XPS on other exterior walls with framed, insulated walls in front...should be R15 or so. I'll put the R13 on the interior walls too; the ones split off my unfinished work room. That just leaves the mess of pipes behind the washer/dryer and sink that reall will not be insulated. There is no way to make a room out them either....they are simply in a bad location.

Is there any type of XPS type product you can put up with out drywall...that might be nice for my work room...

I thank you for providing ideas and answers to my questions. Other than code issues I think I can start getting supplies! I would not have thought surface outlets were up to code but if they are I guess I can start...I would not imagine they make you put an outlet in a closet.

I DID see Phillips brand (code compliant) blue concrete screws today...almost 40% less than tapcon. Now I need to borrow a hammer drill I guess.

Thanks again!


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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

Is there any type of XPS type product you can put up with out drywall...that might be nice for my work room...

The thermal barrier needn't be drywall. There are spray-applied cementitious sprays, Portland cement plaster and proprietary products. As well, the EERE Guide also mentions metal covered foamboards that may not require a separate barrier depending on local Codes. But I don't know what they are either.

Good luck! (Take some pics. I always forget to.)


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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

Yes...I always forget the before and after!


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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

I got a ROTARY hammer drill at Harbor Freight that's been working great.


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RE: Wallmate on basement walls question

I was going to go ther but my brother in law has one!


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