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Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

Posted by mapletex (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 4, 11 at 17:34

So my 9 year old Kenmore is on it's last legs, and I need a replacement. One small problem: I need a machine with a height of 34" or less to fit into the space.

Bosch has machines which measure 33 5/8 inches, which would work. I noticed that their machines do not have hard food disposers, but rather rely on filtration. I am pretty good about scraping and rinsing my dishes before loading them, but my sons are not, and I'm not always around to check before the machine gets turned on.

Has anyone made this switch, and how did you find it? Thanks.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

Almost identical situation to yours except mine was Whirlpool. Replaced previous 9-year-old disposer model with new filter model. IMHO, filter v. disposal is a non-issue. Filter doesn't require frequent attention and it's quick/easy regardless. The quietest machines are all filters. Quiet is more important, now, because the newer machines all take longer to get through a cycle. I'd pay for quiet.

Can't help you with the dimension problem but don't worry about disposer v. filter issue at all.


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

Thanks, asolo. Quiet is important to me too.


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

We recently replaced a 20 year old Kenmore with a basic Monogram dishwasher FYI- 34" height.

It is a disposer model, but I can not identify any sound from it that I would consider disposer noise. Mostly I hear it when water is filling or emptying, so I'm not sure how much the disposer feature contributes to the noise. Monogram specifies noise level as 48 dBA. That's a reasonably quiet rating, but all I know is that compared to our old dishwasher, it's relatively silent.


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

We are in a water war with two other states. We can't spare much water rising before putting in the DW so a disposal is extremely important to me (having a Golden Retriever that likes to lick dishes really helps, lol, I do have the sani rinse feature). : ) A stainless tub and a disposal are the must haves for us. I also have large dishes and need a configuration that will accommodate tall dishes. Good Luck!


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

Filtration-only a non-issue. I've used several Bosch dishwashers and the filter needs cleaning only a few times a year if that - it will collect things like small pieces of plastic wrap that you didn't notice and large seeds. You don't need to wash off your plates any more than with a disposer-equipped DW.


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

You really shouldn't be rinsing dishes any way. Scrape them and wash them. The enzymes in modern dishwasher "detergent" actually need something to chew on or they get bored.

I just couldn't be happier than we are with our Bosch. It has been going strong now for 8 years, is very quiet, cleans very effectively, the filter is a non issue; I rinse it out when I think about it or see something in it. No big deal, don't miss the old howling disposer models in the slightest.


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

Even if the filter is full of gunk, it'll still run okay. So you won't need to be the only one allowed to turn on the machine. Don't worry about it. :)


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

You can also get an Asko or Whirlpool in the height you need. the whirlpool will have a disposal, the Asko will use the filtration. That being said, the enzymes in the detergent you use slowly break down any food left in a filter. Scrape the food off but that's all you have to do with these filtered dishwashers.


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RE: Dishwasher question: Filtration vs disposer

If you go to any appliance repair forum, you will find that after 4-5 years many of the dishwasher designs start to experience issues with dishes not getting clean and outright failures. A lot of these are related to compromises made to add what is called a "chopper" to the system that breaks up larger food residue. The issues are especially prevalent with Whirlpool machines which includes Kitchenaid.

If you have a choice, get the machine without a chopper and choose the filter instead. Most european models use a filter and some of the NA models offer a choice on the higher end.


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