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Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Posted by flevy (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 9, 12 at 14:50

Starting a new thread because I think the max is approx. 100 posts...

nutherokie--I'm so jealous! I can't wait to see pics of your baby. I don't know how you are restraining yourself and not taking delivery until next week.

I'm still waiting on a ship date :( Hopefully I'll hear from Christa this week. The range is the last piece of the puzzle. I'm taking a big chance that the specs are right and having the granite cut accordingly without the range here...cross your fingers that it just slides in nicely.

chris11895--tell us more about your visit? Did you cook on a range? I was debating between the Changy 1400 and the Citeaux but I just couldn't wrap my brain around the size of the vertical ovens. It's nice to hear that they are larger than you thought. Did you get samples of the colors? I was debating between the black and the anthracite also. But then I got the samples and they were pretty close in color....close enough that I didn't want to pay the upcharge. Now for the frangipane....that I'd pay the upcharge for!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hey Flevy! Our bundle of joy has arrived! She is in place and I'm playing around making sure she has all her fingers, toes, burners igniting, ovens heating, etc. We still need to level her and check the oven temps, but Rome -- or should I say-- Paris wasn't built in a day. I only have my iPad right now and don't know how to post photos from it. But I'll post a couple of shots tomorrow.

Hope you get a delivery date soon.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Unfortunately we didn't cook on it as I was in NYC for another event and only had an hour to spare. But I've also cooked on a Lacanche before. Seeing the Citeaux in person just sent me over the moon with happiness :-). I had been going back and forth between the Sully and the Citeaux and within five minutes I was settled on the Citeaux. I was also interested in the Anthracite, and in person I could see a difference but I'd have to agree - it wasn't enough to pay the upcharge. I'm having such a hard time with the color! When I left I was 100% sold on the Black. They had a Black Sully there and I liked the look a lot. And then I got home and started thinking Frangipane!
If anyone is on the fence about the Lacanche I highly suggest visiting them in person. Elisa is just wonderful and got us reservations at ABC Kitchen and Nougatine. Both are Jean-Georges restaurants and the meals were fabulous. My friend was with me for the visit and was equally impressed. She doesn't even cook and spent dinner on Friday night gushing over how excited she was about my future range.
Also, the Citeaux had just returned from a Food & Wine Festival in the city and Elisa was cleaning it with Simple Green. She said she can provide me with cleaning tips so if that interests people I'm happy to get them and post it here.
Christine


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Flevy, as promised, baby pics! She still needs to be shored up and leveled. I haven't tested oven temps. And I haven't removed the film from the toe kick as I wanted the protection until the feet are leveled. Without further ado...

Stork lowers new arrival onto porch, Dad and helpful neighbor stand by to assist:
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still in her cocoon:
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Cleaned up:
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home at last (with the help of four strong movers and a dolly:
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another view:
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Whew!
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Oh nutherokie, she is just beautiful. I love her birth story! It fits so nicely in her space. And your kitchen is beautiful. What are you thinking you are going to cook first? Look at all those little ovens...each one for a specific purpose...*sigh*


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Gorgeous Nutherokie! What a sumptious beauty. Kitchen, too! Love the brick floors, long,tall windows and that your baby has her own room, complete with her own horse. Your home has a romantic arched entrance. I too, want to know what you will cook first. Maybe you'll share photos of your kitchen to the people on the sidelines...like me. Have you picked out any names???

Flevy-thanks for starting another Lacanche thread. I needed it. Tell us about the Lacanche that you are expecting. Be sure to share the due date when you know.

We are going to take the plunge ourselves with a Chagny. The tough decision is Burgundy or Black. If it is Burgundy, the windows through out the house, will be painted Burgundy, too. I'm hoping that it will look like jewel red in some light, and then look like Dark Cherry wood in other lights. Or, if we go Black, the granite that has turned my head is Arctic Cream with lots of black slashes...then the walls can be painted from a larger choice of colors. This is tough.....Burgundy or Black......Burgundy or Black......or maybe that dark Green! Aubergine was my first choice....but the double upcharge was too much. Hmmmm. Frangipane....sounds like a dessert!

The most exciting part of our remodel/rebuild is happening right now with the framing. Each room is taking shape rather than 2D on the plans. It's like....like.... like being engaged. LOLOL


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Flevy and Zippity,

I don't know what we'll cook first. We're still not moved in. I just visit and play house! The stove (still settling on a name) was the last big item, but there are still a few details remaining.

I can't wait to see your range, Flevy.

And Zippity, I had exactly your struggle. I actually had a plywood "stove" made that I'd paint black, then burgundy, then black. I wanted the burgundy SO badly, but I'd already collected approximately a zillion dollars worth of my beloved vintage deco light fixtures and they just didn't play all that well with the red. I hope you can make it work!


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Nutherokie,

Your fans would dearly love to see your vintage deco light fixtures as well as more photos of your dreamy home which appears to be ready to move in...heck, it looks like you have already moved in. There are flowers on the table!

The baby is a Chagny 1400, isn't she? Sweet. We love the concept of dual broilers and 3 ovens....but wow, you can slow cook, too.

Flevy, Any signs of a stork circling the skies above your house?

Christine, Are you planning on ordering a Citeaux? Got a fix on a color yet?

Is there anybody else dreaming of Lacanche babies out there?

Does anyone have names befitting a fine French cooker?


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No peep from the stork yet. But on the plus side, 100% of the kitchen cabinets will be delivered tomorrow. Granite is scheduled to be templated on oct 25. Officially the range is scheduled to leave the factory in early nov. I'm hoping that it can leave earlier.


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Flevy, November's right around the corner! Still I hope you get an early surprise.

Zippity-do-dah, yes. It's a Chagny 1400. She's still negotiating her name. As for the flowers, I'm just so ready to move in that I can't resist "playing house.". How sweet of you to ask about the deco lights. I'll snap some pics this weekend. I was so focused on the range that nothing else made it into the photos.


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nutherokie: that's gorgeous. the stove (naturally) and the kitchen. beautiful.


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Nutherokie - what a gorgeous set-up you've created! Looks very functional, too.

We're just embarking on the which-Lacanche adventure, so I'm busy doing my homework.

Can I ask; how far is your island from the Lacanche, how big is your island, and what did you choose for an exhaust/range hood behind the lovely mantle?


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Oh wow, Pirula, thanks! Yours was one of the first Lacanche ranges I saw. Your whole kitchen was an inspiration.

Why not me, thanks for your kind words. Which models are you considering? I'll javelin to measure my aisle next time I'm at the new house. I believe it's 42 inches. The islan itself is a little over six feet by seven feet.

My exhaust is kind of cobbled together. We had it done locally and well, I'm just keeping my fingers crossed. It's an 800 cfm blower and pretty basic filters. Foetunately, its a short straight run out the roof. We'll see.


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I *think* we're easing towards the same model you bought: yours looks like the Chagny 1400, right?

My husband doesn't think we need the warming oven on the side, and the Chagny will be plenty, but I figure that extra bit will be very useful when we're holding dinner parties, etc, and we do have the space for it. It does add quite a bit to the price, though, which surprised me, although I'm still wandering back and forth around their excellent website figuring everything out, so maybe I've got that wrong.

I like the idea of the very small oven, and two other mid-sized ones.

The Art Culinaire people seem suuper to deal with, too. One of the things that put us off Aga was the awful post-purchase customer service (and frequent requirement for service!), although my initial contact with the area rep was great.

Colour - as my husband says, the black looks STUNNING, but what about a bright colour, lol. I can see another looong debate about that!

Funnily enough, I think our set-up will be quite like yours - sitting underneath a cathedral ceiling, with a full "wall" hiding the exhaust fan, vs a range hood, and a wee bit of cabinetry on either side. We have lots of aged hand-hewn barn lumber, so even that part we had thought of, so were pleasantly surprised to see yours and how lovely and "meant" it looks!

As an aside, how are you going to keep those gorgeous herringbone brick floors clean, lol. Mopping by Pekingese?


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nutherokie--can you measure the thickness of the warming door. I need to make sure that the hinges can clear the cabinets.

Thanks

F


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Hi Flevy,

The door itself is ( by my best measurement efforts) an inch and three eighths thick. Because of the gasket and hinge, the door does not sit absolutely flush against the face frame. So from the face frame to the front of the door it's about an inch and five eighths. I shot a couple of pics. I'll post them tomorrow when I have pc access. Im hoping a picture will be worth a thousand words.

Why Not Me, sorry. I just saw your post. Yes mine is the Chagny 1400. In testing the oven temps I noticed that they come to temperature amazingly fast. I guess that's the benefit of the smaller size!

I feel for you on the color. I still can't believe I didn't move heaven and earth to get the red. The black turned out to be the right choice in my case though. I would have hated to give up my other picks.

I can't wait to see your finished space. How could I not love it? As for the brick, time will tell. It was awful during construction. But now that the mess is out of the house, they seem to stay pretty clean ( looking, at least). The mopping Pekingese is a seriously tempting idea!

And I haven't forgotten about my promise of more pictures. Life is just interfering with my plans.


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Nutherokie - it's been a while & now a new thread. Your kitchen is gorgeous & the black Lacanche was the perfect choice! I've considered a wood counter for my island. Do you have stain issues w/prep sink on wood? I was planning on Super White quartzite but discovered the "eek, etching issues w/my quartzite" thread. Now I'm back to square one.

Debating between the Saulieu or Cluny 1400, large vs small oven. I'm a rice fanatic, & cooked up a nice pot @ Art Culinaire in Woodinville. Quickly boiled it on 11K BTU burner & then switched to Portable Simmer Plate on low 5K BTU. Also tried reducing trivet but it simmered too hot. Nicole also directed me to http://pinterest.com/lacancheusa/ which has beautiful Lacanche kitchens & some interesting kitchen do dahs & recipes.

Look forward to seeing more photos of your lovely kitchen.


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Thank you Nutherokie! Measurements help a lot. Pictures would be nice also :) but not presure....we all just want to see!


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Flevy, here are the door pics I snapped last night. I'm always shocked at how red the brick floors look in photos, especially in artifical light. They're much more brown in person.
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Terzen,

We're still not moved in, but the counters have been in for several weeks now and I have used the sinks a fair amount. I notice no staining at all. I Waterloxed the living daylights out of the counters, so I'm not too concerned. My plan for the island was actually soapstone. I searched for months for a slab big enough to do the whole thing. I even had a slab shipped up by Dorado which they swore was over six feet wide. Wrong. Don't get me started on Dorado Soapstone of Austin, Texas. Not. A. Fan.

Anyway, I always planned wood for the perimeter and thought it would be a stop gap on the island, but I love it! I don't know that I'll want to change it even if the perfect soapstone slab should appear.

I went through the handwringing on oven sizes but finally decided that all the pans I use would fit in the Cluny sized oven. It may be a bit awkward at first to load them lengthwise, but I'm sure I'll adjust. And that fast preheat is fabulous.

Thanks for the tip about the rice. I wouldn't have thought of the simmer plate. That thing is seriously heavy, though -- maybe I'll develop biceps at long last. And thanks for the Pintrest link. I look forward to checking it out.


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Woo Hooo Nutherokie ...... SEXY shots of the stove. OOOoooo LA LA! The drawer pulls are lovely with sexy stove brass. Has she told you her name yet? She looks "Snazzy" to me!

Terzen .... Did the Portable Simmer Plate cook the rice properly? The reducing trivet was too hot to simmer? Did you try anything else? Also, please tell us what stoves and colors that you saw while you were there. Were there any styles or colors that caught your attention? Please, some of us will probably never see the New York or Woodinville showrooms so we would dearly love a full report.


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I am sure you will love it once you move in!
I loved the Cluny I had!


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Zippity-do-dah - I finally ordered my black Cluny last week! It should arrive in March. Switched from the Salieu to the Cluny after visiting a nearby Lacanche ambassador who has had a Cluny 1400 for 6 yrs & loves the smaller ovens.

Ouis, the simmer plate cooked the rice perfectly. The reducing trivet is made of aluminum, and the 5K burner simmer was too hot for that pot of rice (Le Crueset pot).

Ah, the Woodinville showroom is interesting & not your typical appliance store! It's a wine tasting room with a large wooden harvest table in center & Lacanche ranges along the perimeter of the room. Ranges I recall are Vert Sologne Sully, either Aubergene or Burgundy Red Rully, Black Cluny on which I cooked, I think a Chagny , stainless (gorgeous), & a French Blue Citeaux. There had been an orange range, maybe Terra Cotta Cormatin, but I understand it has been shipped to a new Lacanche showroom in California. On one visit I got to see the new crated Lacanches, either waiting to be tested by Art Culinaire or to be shipped out to the new owners. They were calibrating a stunning Burgundy Red Sully at the time. Wish I had the room for one! Now that I have my range picked out, onward ho for the gazillion other decisions to make in my remodel. Thank goodness Garden Web is a constant source of support & ideas.


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Will be building a new house next fall and wondering if anybody has any info on the Delaubrac ranges. I understand that for the quality and money spent it supposed to be one of the best ranges out there. Please advise!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Joe - I and surely many others would be really interested in you sharing where you heard how great Delaubrac ranges are supposed to be - there's always room for another great range to keep the market competitive, after all - but it's certainly been my experience here that, if you want more feedback on a specific brand, it's probably better to start a separate post about it. Just a suggestion!


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Joe - Here is a link to an old post mentioning Delaubrac ranges:
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/appl/msg122004395624.html

I agree with Why not me that a separate post may bring you more hits than from this Lacanche thread. Good luck!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

My range is finally in!!!! I can't tell you how thrilled I am with it. I have been cooking up a storm. I will be honest and say that it took some getting used to. The smaller ovens, the preheat time, the many, many knobs. But I can't imagine having anything else in my kitchen. I absolutely love looking at my range and coming down every day to cook.

I ordered the Changy 1400. The petite broiler really is petite...more like a big toaster oven. But it works when it's just the kids and I and I need to reheat chicken nuggets. No need to turn on the big oven.

I'm still learning how to adjust the racks. The range shipped with 2 different types of racks, one seems to sit level with the slides on the side and the other seems to hang below the slides. I know they're not the broiler racks though.For now, whenever I start cooking something, I place the pans in the ovens before I heat them in order to figure out placement.

But all in all, I love the range. Here it is with a pic of my little one. And the best news is that DH and I picked our backsplash today. We should really be done with the kitchen by the end of Jan!!!

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flevy,

Your Chagny is beautiful! & so is your little one in his holiday duds!

Could your 2nd oven rack include the cookie/pastry sheet that attaches to the rack? I know the Cluny I tested at Art Culianaire came w/two regular racks & a cookie sheet that sort of wrapped around the rack.

Love the dark counters surrounding your range. Are they granite? I'm considering the same thing w/marble or quartize on island.

Thanks for sharing.


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Terezen I'll have to post pics of the racks. The cookie sheets are the dark steel pans. They don't look like racks at all.

So the granite, yes, both counters are actually granite. The black is called premium brushed black. I think it's a form of AB. But it has a leathered finish. It doesn't show dust or fingerprints so I love it. And the island is called sea pearl. With all the comments about quartzite that lturns out to be marble I was worried about etching and patina, but it has withstood sugar cookie cut outs, multiple juice stains, overnight chocolate, and all the other leftovers that comes with small children.


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Can you believe it.......My range finally delivered today. It went so much easier than I though it would - took about 5 minutes from truck to garage. Probably will be six months before I am cooking on it but I am
closer than this time last year. Honestly I have sort of been second guessing my choice of yellow, but it will be cheery and with the right touches other places it will work....just had to share.


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Hi Winesnob,

How exciting for you! The yellow definitely sounds cheery to me as we enter dreary, rainy Jan. in our great Northwest. I chose safe matte black. Have you peeked in your crate, yet? We've moved out of our home & currently it looks like a disaster zone. Hopefully 6 mos. down the road I'll be posting photos of my Cluny in our new kitchen. Congratultions!


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I found a great benefit this weekend... No clock to reset!


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Oh, flevy, you made me laugh! At the rate my remodel is progressing (not), if my Cluny had a clock, it wouldn't have to be reset if we crawl into Nov. My baby came in last week but is sitting in storage due to my contractor being a month behind & now the Proj Mgr quit. As the song goes, Anticipation is making me wait.......


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Oh no Terzen.....that's terrible. Have you uncrated her yet? Seriously...you're thinking Nov? Like Thanksgiving?


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Gosh, flevy, I hope not that long. It is a huge remodel but I thought worst scenario we'd be done by Aug. Now I'm not so sure. My Cluny is being tested at Art Culinaire & will have to be stored off site for now. I'm sure I will think it was worth it once it's behind me! :~)


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Inspite of our best judgement, we're still seriously considering a Lacanche range. The only thing that has been elusive is someone to give us first hand experience with the range with seems to fit our kitchen best, the Rully. Are there any GW readers who have the Rully and are willing to give us the benefit of their experience?


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Welcome, beewoolie! I was hoping a Rully owner would respond. Have you tried contacting Art Culinaire to see if there is a Lacanche ambassador in your area who owns a Rully? If this is not possible, you might go back & read some of the old Lacanche threads to find a Rully owner or perhaps start your own thread asking for Rully info. Good luck in your search!


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Thanks Terzen.

I have talked to Art Culinaire and they tell me that there don't appear to be any Rully owners in Washington state. I need to ask them if there are *any* in the US. As far as I can tell from searching, there aren't any posts that mention the Rully except in passing.


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Lacanche Chagny

I read the mixed reviews ahead of time, but assumed things might be exaggerated. We have had multiple Wolf ranges in the past and currently have one in a second home. We chose Lacanche Chagny with the assumption it's performance would be almost as good as the Wolf. The range is beautiful and a 40" range with three ovens seemed a clever alternative to a Wolf 36" with one large oven. If we needed a larger oven, we'd just use our gas grill. Combined with the hood, the range is the statement piece of the kitchen and the basis for other kitchen decisions.

While there is no denying the Lacanche are beautiful ranges, I wish we would've installed a Wolf. We've had to adjust burners that won't light from the pilot, the electric ovens don't cook evenly, and the gas range knob came delivered with a valve linkage issue. It wouldn't turn off in the off position. Eventually the linkage came completely undone. We were able to turn the oven off, but we've yet to fix the linkage. That is next week's project.

Eric in service has been very helpful. He has sent us video links to fix these things ourselves. In order to get to the valve linkage, the entire top has to be removed. While I don't anticipate my husband having a problem fixing the linkage, there's certainly a chance we will end up with a bill from an appliance repair. This was not the service I expected when I purchased this range. Videos and DIY.

We are doing our best to work through the kinks of the Lacanche. We are cooks and use it constantly and have been able to make adjustments for oven size and uneven cooking. I didn't think I'd miss self cleaning ovens, but I do. My husband kept his positive front up about the range until just recently when he admitted the Wolf is better but "this range is just fine." At this price point, I don't want just fine.

To those who love your Lacanche ranges, I'm happy for you. It was the happy reviews from which I based my purchase.


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Hi Renome,

My Lacanche is sitting in storage, & your story is an uneasy one to hear. I empathize about the lack of on-site service for a range in this price point. My DH & I debated all the pros & cons read online, but decided to go for it. He is very handy & likes the simplicity of it w/o the computerized/digital do dahs. I know I will be relearning to cook w/this range & will constantly monitor the oven. I've had to do this with my past ovens, too, so not a problem for me. BTW, your wooden countertop & backsplash are stunning!

Beewoolie, you will have to decide what you are unwilling to compromise at this price point as renome pointed out. Check other threads for info on all the ranges you are considering. I'll try to input my Lacanche experiences on this thread as renome has done. Good luck in your choice!


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Thanks to all the gardenweb Lacanche posters. Your input and opinions were invaluable to our decision making. We ordered our black Cluny today and hope to have it installed with the completion of our remodel this summer. We'll post pics as we make progress and will share any learning points. The attached pic shows our plan.


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Congratus Panderkager on your order. Your plans look beautiful. And now the wait begins....Can't wait to see the finished kitchen.


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New here as I finalize appliance choices for remodeling our historic home's kitchen; hubby and I both love to cook, have big family meals/gatherings numerous times/year. Looking at Chagny 1400 with petite broiler/oven for simple meals when it's just hubby/me and oh so much more capacity when we need it. Biggest decision blockers are twofold:

1. cost: dollar for dollar for significantly less I can achieve acceptable cooking results with Bluestar/similar - will Lacanche really elevate our cooking worth $5-7 thousand more in cost? (the shipping alone is killing me... and potential service calls/repairs sound nightmarish)

2. form vs function: aesthetics are incomparable with Lacanche! oh so beautiful and appropriate for this lovely 100+ year old place we call home :-) However, I read on other sites its function lacks in basic areas: consistent heat with burners and ovens; cleaning/constant messy interior oven drips; poor interior oven lighting

Your experiences and thoughts? Many thanks ~


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ebenedict,

I haven't used a bluestar, but am pretty sure it would cook great. We have a cluny and have had it, I think, since 2005 or so. We cook a lot, and are (sad but true) food snobs so we cook from magazines and "high end stuff" a lot. We cook on it everyday. I still love her!

Our burners are fine and we adjusted our ovens to where, while maybe not perfect, are close enough for us. When we bake or roast we have always just used recipe times as a rough guide - even pre-Julia.

People drip in other ovens, I don't think that's exclusive to Lacanche. Twice a year we clean our ovens. Honest, it's just not that hard. I don't think I ever owned a self-cleaning oven that worked well enough for me to consider self-cleaning a great option. I would agree that oven lighting would have been nice.

The only problem we ever had with ours was when I removed an oven door and put it back wrong. I managed to bend a hinge. They sent me a new set and I had it back together in literally 15 minutes. Plus, it's pretty basic. I'm sure just about any oven repair man could fix any issue it might have.

Can't help you with the cost issue. Looks were certainly one aspect we considered, and that was no contest. Ultimately, we wanted a balance of fire power and beauty. We haven't once regretted our decision.

Joe


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I have made a choice and we purchased a Cluny in anthracite. I am over the moon just as I was when I first was looking for ranges of any kind to replace a gas cook top of 24 yrs., searching and reading on the web, curious to know about the La cornue, I googled french ranges because I wasn't sure of the spelling. By happy serendipity, I saw photos of the LaCanche and began to read and look. I was absorbed, fascinated and knew in my heart this was the range.
Since we have not done any home improvements except for painting and putting in built ins for the kids, my husband agreed to redo our kitchen (rather than move!). LaCanche has a saying "Bringing family back to the table". Once he saw the LaCanche, he became excited about doing the kitchen for our family, for us- rather than for me. The Cluny LaCanche has brought my husband back to the table of being inspired to take a solid and joyful interest in our remodel.


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Congratulations homeimprovementmom! The Cluny is such a gorgeous range. Are you getting any warming cupboards on yours? What made you decide on that model?

My husband sounds a lot like yours. He cooks occasionally with me but didn't particularly care about which range I picked. A range was a range as far as he was concerned, and the less I could buy one for, the better. When I told him I'd fallen in love with a $13k-ish range he thought I was out of my mind...until I showed it to him and showed him a video with a chef cooking on one. The enthusiasm was contagious and now we are planning all kinds of family get-togethers as an excuse to use our range.

We are torn between the Citeaux and the Chagny 1400 right now. The Citeaux is more symmetrical and therefore more pleasing to my eye, and also has one larger oven that would be nice for roasting vegetables for a crowd. However, I've fallen in love with the petite broiling oven on the Chagny, as I absolutely know I would use it every day that I am cooking for just the two of us. We live in an area that is generally pretty warm so I like the idea of using a small oven that puts out as little heat into the room as possible. And so many small things I could do with it that bother me to warm up a big oven for, like finish pan-seared meat, broil veggies or fish, bake brownies, toast nuts, etc...

I am also torn on the color. I think my two favorites are the Provence Yellow and the Matte Black, but then I look at the Mandarine, Burgundy Red, and Portuguese Blue and the stainless with brass, and the Aubergine, and...well, you get the idea. But I think I am pretty much decided on either the Provence Yellow or the Matte Black. I love the yellow because it is so cheery and warm and friendly and I know it would perk me up every time I looked at it. And I love the Matte Black because it would be so versatile and allow me to use pops of color that could be swapped out on a whim. (I suspect this is the same for your anthracite.) Also, it is so stately and traditional without being off-putting. But then, the Burgundy Red with brass trim would be so beautiful, especially at Christmas time, and would really fit in with the classic French country theme we're going for. Choices, choices...

I'd love for some of the folks who posted on here in the past to share updates about their ranges. Do they still love them as much as they did before they took the plunge? Would they do it again? Would they purchase a different model or different options and if so, why? Their remarks in the past are part of what has made me willing to purchase such an expensive range site unseen, and I'm so thankful for all the information they shared already. But an update certainly wouldn't hurt!


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We bought a burgundy cluny. I would do it just the same. We have the french top, which doesn't get used as much as I thought it would. We don't cook 30 pound gmo turkeys so the ovens are a perfect size for us. We've had one problem and that was when I removed the oven doors to clean the oven and managed to put one in wrong and ruined the hinge. I think the part cost $25 and it took me all of five minutes to install.

We cook a lot in our house and have never had an issue of a burner either not being hot enough or doing a low enough simmer. For us, this stove was as close to being designed specifically for us as you can get.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi All,
Hi, we chose the Cluny because of the 2 ovens and opted for all gas with the traditional top. I have cooked on gas and have always had gas ovens. I don't broil a lot so I won't miss the broiling in the ovens. I at first thought the Cluny 1400 or the Sully would work in our space but it turns out we didn't have the clearance. My husband chose the anthracite. I am happy with his choice but I would have been a bit bolder and chosen the delft blue, the stainless steel which really is an artistic version of stainless, or even the orange or fragapane!
We have not yet finished the remodel but the Cluny has arrived. The range inspires me!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

I will try to upload a few photos of before and when we get to after I will upload those.
Our kitchen was tiny and we have taken the bold step to expand.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

sorry, I don't know how to add more than one photo and these got out of order. This is a photo of a our kitchen before demolition. There were 2 gas wall ovens on the left and a gas cooktop on the right.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi all,

There is new movie from France called "Haute Cuisine" and it is about a personal chef to their president who was to recreate the cuisine of his boyhood. She was from Perigord so there were many scenes of fois gras and truffles.

After she was walked past the large kitchen where the stainless steel and white toqued chefs were stationed she was shown where she was to be installed as his private chef. The person giving her the tour states proudly that "Here is a Lacanche range for you to perform on and backed up to it, it's twin." And then there is a long loving shot of one of them.

And so for the next 90 minutes she cooks extrordinary traditional French cuisine on her Lacanches. I grew up loving that food and it was what inspired me to cook for a career.

Lacanche must be quite an enviable item to be made such a point of.

I was in heaven!

Marty


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Our Lacanche Cluny arrived today! We had to delay delivery over a month since our remodel is behind schedule, but it arrived safe and sound, and well packed. Will post pics as we install it and share any installation tips.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Beautiful indeed, Panderkager - hope the installation goes smoothly, and looking forward to photos of the next stage!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hey Panderkager! I'll swap you those ugly, shiny brass knobs for my nicely patenad ones

Congrats.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi Everyone! I am a longtime lurker here on the Lacanche threads and it is thanks to everyone here that I am the happy owner of a Lacanche Chagny 1400. I was initially planning on getting an Aga. I am so happy that I did not make that decision!
Our kitchen remodel took a very long time and is still not completely finished, but I have been cooking on my range for two months now and I love it. Our Chagny 1400 has 6 burners (three 15,000 btu, two 11,000 btu, one 5,000 btu, and the traditional french top). One thing that I learned very quickly is that this range has serious power. I have only used the french top a few times. It is great for making my homemade mac and cheese. I boil the water on the center and make the bechamel further out to the sides of the plate where the heat is not as intense. I think that I will use it more as the weather gets cooler. It throws some serious heat into the room and standing over it for a length of time gets pretty toasty! It is very fun to cook on and I can't wait to use it over the holidays.
As for the other burners, they are powerful and I only get a true simmer with my 5,000 btu while using the heat diffuser. I highly recommend heat diffusers for those who love to cook long and low on the stove top.
I could not live without the warming cupboard and am not quite sure how I made it all of this time without one! Being able to make a meal and hold it in the cupboard until serving time is wonderful for several reasons. One, I can have everything ready for the party before it begins so that I can enjoy my guests when they arrive. Second, my husband gets home late on weekdays and the time he arrives home is determined by the traffic. I am able to hold the food in the warming cupboard until he gets home which also enables me to clean the kitchen. There is nothing more wonderful to me than eating dinner and knowing that the cooking mess is already taken care of! Oh, did I mention that it is a dream to proof bread in? Warm plates and mugs have become a frequent request in the house. I wouldn't live without the warming oven unless I had to. It is so versatile and makes cooking easier, especially large meals of many dishes.
I am still learning the petite broiler so maybe those with more experience can give advice. It is small. I can fit a 13x9 pan in there (think pyrex) or a small cookie sheet. That is it. It gets hot and I have managed to crisp several things! One thing that comes out great in the petite broiler for me is cast iron pizza-as good as a pizza restaurant according to my husband!
The ovens are small and will take some getting used to for those of us who are used to the size of an american oven, but the adjustment is well worth it. They cook like a dream and I have had no problems with uneven heat. I did have to find a 14 inch roasting pan as that is the largest size that will fit in the Chagny 1400 ovens.
For those who are on the fence, I say, "Go for it!" The Lacanche is so fun to cook with and it makes cooking large meals effortless ( I will not mention how much weight I have gained in the last two months ;0).
I am happy to answer any questions that anyone may have and for those in CT who are thinking of making a purchase, I am happy to have you come see my Lacanche in person and test drive her!
Here is a picture of our range. Sorry, the backsplash has not come in yet and the range hood has not been plastered yet.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Beautiful kitchen ctkristin! I also have a Changy 1400. Ive had it about a year now and I still love it. What was odd and unusual now seems normal. This is the first year that I'm going to do make thanksgiving dinner.

What temp do you set the warming oven to for holding food and for warming plates. I've yet to get it right, either the food is too cold when it comes out or I've set the oven too high and it continues to cook. I'd love to get it right for thanksgiving.

I've also crisped a few things in the petite broiler. I tend to keep the temp a bit lower than I normally would and pay a bit more attention. One thing that I've noticed is that now I cook more by smell then I did with my old GE. I worried when I ordered the LaCanche that not having a timer would be an issue. But now I just smell when the food is done and I'm usually right within 5-10 min.

But if I had to do it again, I would get the Sully 1800 or 2200. There is an extra cabinet next to our oven. I dream of taking it out and getting a bigger range but I think my husband would kill me. But it's not for the bigger ovens, I really wish I had more burners. We have the grill plate and use it every day. It eats up 2 burners :(. Something simple like grilled chicken with a starch, some sautéed veggies and a sauce all of a sudden takes up all the burners. I have no idea how I ever cooked with just 4.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thanks flevy! This kitchen has been a labor of love and at times I have thought I would lose my mind. We started demo back in May. We had to completely gut the entire kitchen due to rotted floor joists and hidden water issues. The cool thing is that we discovered that our house is an old dairy barn so that is why we decided to use antique barn beams in the kitchen. We wanted to honor our little barn's history.
Anyway, my dream was to get the Chagny 1800. My poor husband almost passed out due to the size of the range and the price tag! I agree with you, I could see myself getting along just fine with more burners. I, too, am not sure how I cooked with my old four burner stove!
As for the warming cupboard. I set it at about 125 degrees. This keeps the food warm without continuing the cooking. I put the plates in about 10 minutes before I need them so they don't come out screaming hot. This seems to work for me.
I baked a chicken pot pie in the petite broiler this weekend. I set the temp a bit lower than I usually would and I kept my eye on it. To my complete delight I did not burn the dish and it came out wonderfully!
I have not used the grill plate yet. Did you season it before the first use?
What size turkey do you think you will get in the oven? I am taking over the Thanksgiving dinner next year and am already trying to plan what I will be able to fit in the ovens.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

I'm so enjoying everyone's stories about their Lacanche ranges!

Just a note for all the worries about turkeys....don't forget you can spatch-cock it, or joint it, either partially or fully, and then not only will you fit it more easily in the oven, but it has the potential to cook more evenly, too.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Can you convert the traditional plate to a burner?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Ctkristin--so glad your pot pies came out nice. It does suck when you put in so much effort and end up burning the final product.

Thanks for the hint on the warming cupboard. I'll give it a try this week.

We're having 15 people for dinner. I have no idea how big of a turkey to buy. My husband is also talking about making a standing rib roast. I only have the 2 ovens plus an Advantium Speed oven but if both main ovens are occupied cooking meats, I'm not sure how I'm going to be able to roast vegetables for 15, bake stuffing, or sweet potatoes. Ha...I knew I should have put in those double wall ovens also!

For the grill plate, I think we did season it first. Now it's pretty much non-stick.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Flevy,
I can't wait to hear how Thanksgiving dinner goes and how you accomplish cooking for your guests with your Lacanche. Christmas Eve is the holiday that I host every year until I add Thanksgiving next year. Luckily we keep it simple on the night before Christmas. I make an array of different lasagnas with salad and homemade Italian bread and lots of homemade desserts. I am looking forward to seeing how the meal prep goes with the Lacance. I will be able to cook A LOT of lasagna in the ovens and keep them warm before guests arrive. The temptation is to make MORE food mainly because with the Lacanche I can! LOL I must resist the urge!

Is anyone else having trouble keeping the aluminum burner covers (not the brass tops) clean. Two of mine got covered in brown spots the first time I used them. I washed them immediately and they did not come clean. I am getting used to the fact that my cooker will not stay pristine forever or even for very long, but these spots are pretty bad and nothing has cleaned them up. My mother suggested getting a second set of caps and brass tops (LOL) for when company comes. It is a lovely idea, but a very expensive one that I am not wiling to do at the moment.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thank you all for sharing your experiences with your Lacanche ranges. I am currently in the middle of a kitchen remodel that is being held up while I make this critical but difficult decision regarding purchasing a Lacanche range. I can understand how some people spend years mulling this over but I've only got about another week or two! I am leaning towards the Chagny 1400 because of its charm and the variety of ovens it offers. I understand that I will need to adjust to the unique sizes of the ovens and I am willing to do that but I must set my passion aside for a moment and consider the practical as well. This is where I need your help! If you could please share your honest experiences with me I would so appreciate it. These are my questions/concerns:

1) How many of you own additional (larger, wall) ovens?
2) How long can food stay in the warming drawer and still be safe to consume?
3) Is it really feasible to bake (2 small trays of cookies, tops, I presume) in the oven under the petite oven if I make it convection (which they say they can do although it is not recommended)?
4) How tall is the petite oven in reality when you consider the broiler unit?
5) Is the drip plan placed on the oven floor or the lowest rack? How does this impact your 12" cooking height?
6) What combination of gas and electric did you go with? I am considering eclectic on the left (petite oven with broiler on top and convection below) and gas in the center oven.
7) Re: the Citeaux model - it would be nice to have the larger oven but if this were gas would the smaller 12" wide oven really be large enough to bake anything in?
8) How much space (above, below, on the sides) is needed around the pan when you are cooking?
9) Is there a source (preferably convenient and affordable) for pans that fit in the ovens better?

I know this is a lot of questions and I would be so thankful to all of you if you would share your experiences with me before I take the plunge!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

I have a cluny
1) How many of you own additional (larger, wall) ovens?
Nope, just the two in my oven

3) Is it really feasible to bake (2 small trays of cookies, tops, I presume) in the oven under the petite oven if I make it convection (which they say they can do although it is not recommended)?
Our ovens can take half sheet pans. No convection. We often make cookies this way and switch the trays half way through.

4) How tall is the petite oven in reality when you consider the broiler unit?
12" in my cluny

5) Is the drip plan placed on the oven floor or the lowest rack? How does this impact your 12" cooking height?
Either. Not sure what you mean here. If we are cooking a whole turkey it's on rack in a roasting pan.

6) What combination of gas and electric did you go with? I am considering eclectic on the left (petite oven with broiler on top and convection below) and gas in the center oven.
One of each

8) How much space (above, below, on the sides) is needed around the pan when you are cooking?
I own a 14" saute pan and it fits nicely.

9) Is there a source (preferably convenient and affordable) for pans that fit in the ovens better?

You have asked a lot of questions about oven sizes. We have done whole turkeys to about 14 pounds in the oven with out too much trouble. We've never needed bigger birds so maybe larger could be accommodated. I can't think of anything that would require more room than a turkey. This year we deconstructed two 18 pound turkeys. We have finally come to realize we never carve at the table anyway, and cutup turkey is way easier and faster to cook.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thank you so much joeboldt for your response. I have decided to go with the Chagny 1400 in burgundy!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

There are so many questions that need to be answered periodically by veterans for the benefit of people who have interest in buying a Lacanche. I've had mine since 2004 or 5--can't remember exactly. It has spoiled me for life, that's for sure. It has many deficiencies, but for my purposes, it is just about perfect. I have a Cluny, portuguese blue. Single handedly raises the value of your house, I think. Now, with 5 burners, I never, ever, run out of space. Also, don't forget that the large surface functions as a landing area for things that need to cool down, or that come out of the oven.
I cook huge Thanksgiving dinners--and the largest turkey I had in the oven was almost 20 pounds. As long as it clears the door, I'm fine with that. 18 pounds is what I normally order. I then buy another smaller turkey "just in case" and cook it to be done earlier, so as to use the second oven for side dishes.

Cleaning the ovens is no great mystery--and I don't do it very often--sorry.

I think the electric oven is a problem--sometimes I get lucky and it gives me a consistent temperature. For years, I used an oven thermometer. Now I have learned its idiosyncrasies and know if it is running hot--sometimes, remembering my days in the the Soviet Union--I put a wooden spoon in the door to cool it off.

It is gorgeous, and I still polish the brass with some regularity; the aluminum caps are hopeless. My very particular sister in law, who I love, by the way, couldn't stand looking at them, and tried to clean them. Even she gave up.

I could only afford mine because I self-imported it those many years ago. I don't know if it is possible anymore, but it worked for me and when I look back at having paid under $4K which included shipping, it was worth the gamble. My biggest interest then and now was the cooktop with lots of power, functional if not perfect ovens (not a huge baker) and looks. I got what I paid for, plus. And, by the way, I've had absolutely no problems of a mechanical nature with the exception of a bad ignition. I found someone to replace it, and all has been well for the last few years. That's saying something, I think. Dependable. Beautiful.

The enamel looks simply perfect--nothing like it. A last comment about color: When you see the stoves in the pictures on the Lacanche website, you are looking at them from the wrong perspective: as if you were sitting on the floor look straight at the oven doors. In reality, once the range is in position, you are standing above it and see stainless steel, and only peripherally, the color below. In other words, the impact of the color is much less than you would expect--so you can afford to be very brave. I was nervous about Portuguese Blue--and it is gorgeous, but not a noisy element in the kitchen's design. If you have any hesitancy about a color, don't feel you need to play it safe--you'll be happy with the elegance of this range in any color.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

With a few weeks to spare our kitchen is finally finished! I will be hosting Christmas Eve dinner for the family and cannot wait to cook in the Lacanche. We have been enjoying our Chagny 1400 so much. I cannot imaging cooking without it! Here is a photo with the backsplash complete.

Happy holidays to all.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Gorgeous - you must be SO excited!

Where did you get the steel hanging rack for your pots and pans? It looks very substantial, not skimpy, like many I've seen.

Love your cabinetry, too.

Lucky, lucky. :)


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thanks Why Not Me! I am excited. This kitchen was nine years in the making and the remodel started back in May!

The pot rail is by Enclume. They make both ceiling and wall rails/racks and I believe that the wall mounted rails come in a number of sizes. It is very substantial. I searched high and low for a wall mounted rack that wasn't flimsy like so many that I have seen. Beware that it is not cheap, but I felt that the cost was worth it when using it for functional purposes rather than for looks. If my brain does not fail me, I think you can get the rails with brass accents and hooks. It is a very well made product and I recommend it for those who love pot rails and racks.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hello all:
I've been researching the Lacanche brand for a few weeks now mainly because my wife loves the aeshtetics. Me being an engineer, I try to look beyond the shell and assess the functionality/reliability. Since there are no dealers near me to view, I'm forced to search the internet for any reviews. The only negative comments I've found were on a UK website. See below.

http://www.reviewcentre.com/reviews50914.html

Can anyone comment on the 39 reviews that are mostly negative and all seem to have similar complaints/issues?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

I'll take a stab.

Uneven oven temps:
Ovens turn on and then off. If you dial in 350, it may heat to 375, turn off until it's back down below 350, then on again. There is no magic way to have it stay at exactly 350 all the time. People have been baking delicate pastries and meats this way for a few hundred years. We make the occasional soufle and all sorts of baked good with no issues.

Hot knobs:
Yes, the knobs by oven doors do get pretty warm. I wouldn't say hot though.

Pricey parts:
The only thing I've had to replace was a set of hinges. I somehow managed to put the door back in wrong and messed one up. I think the replacements were $25 per hinge. So you can decide if that's expensive. As an engineer, you will appreciate how easy they were to change. All of five minutes.

Repair:
Ignoring the looks of the stove, it's function is basically, "get the right amount of gas to the burner." It does that just fine and I think because it is so simple, I can't imaging it would be hard to repair. But, I've never had someone here to touch it, so maybe some else can chime in.

We cook everyday and we hardly ever make something that's simple. We are food snobs (There! I'll admit it ;) and this stove does everything we need. I know there are cooks out there that want an ever so shallow simmer. Go buy a diffuser, it will spread the heat more evenly anyway.

I don't know why the British didn't like their stoves. Maybe it's a Anglo/Franco issue. I wonder what they said about the Agas?

We would buy ours again without question.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

I am in your boat as well (I'm an engineer, wife likes the aesthics, and so do i). We live in the NYC area, so had a chance to jump into the showroom with Elisa at Art Culinare. These are nice pieces of equipment. Something I did not know is that the bottom storage draws are now soft close and much more solid. As it should be at this price. Went in thinking we wanted the larger oven (Citeaux or Sully), and low and behold, the Cluny is the pick. Even Provence Yellow is in the running !!

As far as the reviews from the UK go, I think they're an anomaly. I was somehwat alarmed as well. There are bad reviews for almost any product, and I can give one for my new Apple iPad Air (Safari crashes way too much).

Good Luck !


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thanks guys! We've narrowed our choices to Lacanche and La Cornue. We are currently in contact with Nicole at Art Culinare to hopefully view a Lacanche range nearby.

FYI, some friends of ours just recently purchased a La Cornue and it is a very nice piece of equipement. Does anyone have any experience with both?

bakerboy63:
The more reviews I read, the more hair I want to pull out! You are correct, there are bad reviews for ALL!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ctkristin ---it's beautiful! How's the cooking going? Good luck this week. What's on the menu?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Tega,

I have not used both, but I am friends with the LaCornue sales guy. From what I can tell, unless you are looking at the Chateau, or maybe the small 1908, you're not getting the real deal (vaulted oven that they are known for). If you are getting the Chateau, you basically can buy anything you want, and your house should be a MULTI-million variety, IMHO. That being said, they are amazing ranges. If you want the sales guys name, let me know. He says Tom Brady and Giselle have one going in their new home ! He also says all the celebs get the small ones for their NYC digs. This is because all the top designers spec top of the line when the budget is essentially unlimited. Nice place to be...


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hey Flevy! :-) Thanks! The cooking is going far too well. I am slowly learning that just because I can cook food for 50 people with this range doesn't mean that I should actually do so on a daily basis! Weight Watchers here I come! LOL

How did Thanksgiving dinner go? I thought of you that day. Did you cook a whole turkey? If so what size? My mother in law judges all ranges by the size turkey that it can hold. The first thing she asked when she saw the Lacanche was, "What size turkey can you get in that oven?" Having not tried it yet, I didn't have an answer so she said that the range is suspect until she knows the turkey situation! Ha Ha! Anyone out there who has cooked a whole turkey in the Chagny willing to chime in to get me out of the "oven dog house" with my mother in law?!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

bakerboy63:
Appreciate for the info! My wife actually prefers the looks of the Cornue Fe' 110, but was wondering of the cooking differences. It appears with Lacanche you can customize your cook top.
Yes, please send me the salesman's contact info.

FYI, I should be viewing a Lacanche after the holidays.

On the Lacanche, is there a light inside the oven?
Thank you and Merry Christmas!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

I will get you the info for the LaCornue guy. I believe there is a light in the Lacanche, but not 100% sure. The 110 is a nice looking range ! The 2 are very different in look.

Merry Xmas to you as well.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi Tega! Yes, there is a light in the Lacanche ovens. Happy deciding! :0) La Cornue ranges are gorgeous! I don't think you can go wrong either way! Can't wait to hear which you decide on. Happy Holidays


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ctkristin--good luck tonight! I made a 16lb bird on Thanksgiving. It fit with no issues. I had room for a bigger bird if I wanted it. The downside was that it took up the entire oven. And then the baking pies took up the electric oven. The petit broiler is cute but really can't handle cooking a dish for 20. Thanksgiving was the first time that I wished I had put in the wall ovens also. But then I would probably only use all 4 ovens once or twice a year. That seems like a lot of money for a few times a year project.

All in all, dinner came out great and I really used the warming oven to keep everything warm before dinner.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

This is my first time posting. I was a lurker for a long time and, like many of you, chose my Lacanche based on what I read in this forum.

I've been cooking on my Lacanche for six months and love it. It's not perfect but is a joy to use and produces beautifully cooked, delicious food. For me the simmer function on all but the smallest burner is too high, so when I want a real simmer, even with a large pot, I move it to the small burner. (Have to get a heat diffuser.) I haven't yet used the french plate much but need to start--especially since that was one of the big reasons I chose a Lacanche. The ovens are fine--yes it's true that they cycle on and off to maintain temperature, but if the food comes out well, I don't see why that matters. I've made delicate things like pots de creme and souffle, as well as lots of roasts, and everything has been perfect. Food does tend to cook a bit faster, so I shave 5 or 10 minutes off the cooking time for a first check. The petite broiler oven definitely cooks very quickly on broil--I have to check the food frequently. But I used it at normal temperature for heating up a loaf of bread without it getting too hot.

As for looks, there is nothing like a Lacanche. I think it's the most beautiful stove in the world--more beautiful than a La Cornue. To have one in my kitchen is a dream come true. I chose the Portuguese blue and was nervous about it, wondering whether I should have ordered the French blue instead, but it looks spectacular in my white kitchen. I don't have a big house or a big kitchen but am utterly content.

If you're interested in seeing the stove (and the kitchen), it was posted on Maria Killam's Color Me Happy blog at www.mariakillam.com/whitekitchentransformation/‎


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Kay,

Awesome kitchen! I inferred from 'Upstate NY' and some accessories you used that you may be from the Syracuse area. Go Orange if you are (I grew up there). Anyways, we are in the process of choosing our color Lacanche. I think we may go GLOSS black (not std matte black). We chickened out on the provence yellow. You have a very workable kitchen considering the size. Thanks for sharing.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Kay, I'm another Portuguese blue person--just still love it after six years! The kitchen is just gorgeous--and I just bought the Rohl faucet for my other house--in polished nickel--I'm taking ideas from your kitchen!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi Flevy! Christmas Eve dinner went very well. The only trouble I had was with the petite oven. I cooked one of the lasagnas in it, made sure to turn the temp a bit lower than I would in the regular sized ovens, kept my eye on it, but the bottom got too browned before the rest of the lasagna was bubbly. I am not sure what I am doing wrong with this petite oven. I have read over and over again that it can be used as a regular oven, but I just can't get the hang of it! Outside of that, homemade bread came out excellent and was happy to see that my pizza stone fit perfectly in the oven.
All in all, cooking for 17 was a breeze and everything was served hot thanks to the warming oven and the storage drawer under the gas oven. A large gathering is where the Lacanche truly shines.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Kristin,

I wanted to ask you about your Chagny. I am thinking about buying one.

Have you have tried the grill plate accessory? It looks like, from the online configurator, that it would sit over the two burners with 11,000 BTUs each. I was wondering if these get hot enough to sear and grill a fat steak. Or can you instead put it over the two burners with 5,000 and 15,000 BTUs and keep the steak directly over the larger one to sear it, etc.

Also, the petit oven looks very interesting. I have been reading around and I think it gets up to almost 600 degrees Fahrenheit. Have you tested it in terms of temps? My thinking is if it gets up to 550 to 600 then it would make a great pizza oven. How useful has it been?

Thanks!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi KSST

I have used my grill plate just once. I grilled flank steak for fajitas. The grill plate is very flexible, you can set it over any of the burner configurations. When I used it I set it over my two 11,000 btu burners. The steaks seared beautifully with both of the burners set to medium heat. You could certainly set the grill over your 5,000 and 15,000 burners and adjust them to get the heat that you want, or for searing heat set it over the two 15,000's- holy smokes! Just an FYI- the grill plate is a bit needy when it comes to cleaning and it is HEAVY! I have a stone sink and I held my breath while scrubbing it clean!

As for the petite oven, the only thing that I have mastered in that is pizza- namely pizza in a cast iron pan. I preheat the pan and the oven to 450. Once they are up to temp I put my pizza crust in the pan, dress it up with sauce, cheese, goodies, etc., olive oil the crust and pop it back in the petite oven turning down the oven to 375. Awesome pizza!!!! I make pizza for the entire family in the regular electric oven. My pizza stone fits in there so I am able to make good sized pizzas in that oven.

I have tested the temp in my petite oven and it is spot on, but I still need to set the temp a bit under what I normally would.I have crisped quite a few things that I didn't want crisped! I cooked a lasagne in it for Christmas Eve. Set it at 350 a I normally would, the bottom of the noodles burned before the lasagna got bubbly. Still getting the hang of that oven-so I can't say that I love it...YET. Other than my cast iron pan, The largest thing I can fit in the petite oven is a 9x13 lasagna dish. It truly is a petite oven! I have read that people have been able to use it to reheat food, but I haven't been able to successfully do that, the outside gets overdone before the inside warms up. I am not giving up, still chalking it up to user error, but I just wanted to give you my experience so that you have lots of info to make your decision.

If you are so inclined, consider the warming oven- it is a dream and so versatile!

I hope this has helped. Can't wait to hear what you decide. Do you have a color in mind?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Ctkristin-- I'm also struggling to master the petit broiler. I find the if I put the rack on the rack glides, the food is too close to the element. If I put the rack on the floor of the oven, the food is far enough away that things work out okay. But in both cases, the bottom tends to burn before the top is ready. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong.

KSST- - we have the grill plate accessory. We probably use it 3-4 times a week. The worst part is cleaning it. I wish it wasn't so heavy. I put it over the 2.11k burners. We sear steaks and then finish off in the oven. Grilled chicken is a quick and easy go to dinner. I've done fish and veggies as we'll. off all the accessories, this is my favorite.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Has anyone seen the new lean cuisine commercial? Did you notice the beautiful white lacanche in the background?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Greeting Lacanche owners! I am seriously considering the Volnay plus a second 24" oven and have a few questions for you.

The Volnay range extends 31.5" from the back wall. Our countertops are 24.75". That means the range will stick out almost 7" from the countertops. I know you don't want the range to be flush with your countertops, but this seems like a very large margin. We are not doing a full kitchen remodel and our intent is to leave the cabinets as is. Our range would be at the end of a counter run with a hallway next to it. I'm worried about coming around the corner and hitting my hip. Our galley kitchen has 52" inches between the counter runs so I think this is okay. But, does your range stick out this much? Does it bother you? Do you bump into it? Get used to it? Any other thoughts about this?

Also, for those of you who do not have a broiler, do you miss it? Mostly I don't think we would. We always grill meat on our charcoal grill rather than on a broiler but I do use the broiler in our current range when I make pizza and to brown cheese toppings. I know I can get an electric oven with a broiler but I'm looking at a Wolf or Miele steam convection oven for a second oven whose max temps are ~440. So, I think I'd like to complement it with a gas oven that goes to 550F. I just wish the gas oven had a broiler. Thoughts?

Do you use the warming cabinet as much as you anticipated when you bought the range? I imagine proofing dough, making yogurt, holding sides warming until the main course is ready, warming plates, and perhaps using it for a slow braise. Do you use it in ways you found unexpected? How so? I would consider the Saulieu with two ovens but I'd like to be able to proof dough, make yogurt and warm plates. Any Saulieu owners with the same priority - what did you do for your low-temp requirements?

Clinsrega, it looks like you have the Volnay + Miele speed oven. How is this combination working out for you? Do you use the warming cabinet much?

I've been to see them and think they are not only gorgeous but look like a dream to cook on (both criteria I'd like to meet). Any other thoughts, opinions are welcome. Thanks in advance for any input.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ctkristin,

Thank you for the reply.

I am debating the color, my wife wants the French Blue and I like the baby blue or Armor. So we will see.

My daughter makes cookies often, and I make pizzas a few times a week when in the mood, so the petit broiler is what got us interested. She is begging me for it. 9"x13" casserole dish is good enough size.

Plus I like the idea of being able to cook up a few steaks on the indoor grill and not having to go outside. I do not mind the cleaning, and lugging the thing to the sink won't kill me, and that chore will undoubtedly fall to me since it was my idea he he.

Other than that… still in decision mode. But fairly certain we will be going with the Chagny. If I can roast a prime rib of 10 to 13 pounds, all the oven I need, and the Chagny ovens will accommodate. Our turkeys are in the 15 pound range and should be fine as well. We could end up throwing in a standard size wall oven and will see. We hope to have the kitchen remodel begun in a few months.

Again, thank you for your reply.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

KSST:

We are looking at colors too! French blue is what I'm leaning toward these days but I'm waiting to get the samples.

One thing to consider with the smaller ovens like those with the Chagny (if you haven't already) is that they don't fit 1/2 sheet pans (or at least they don't fit MY half sheet pans). We use ours day in / day out so this was a deal breaker for the smaller ovens for us (we are looking at the Volnay + wall oven). That broiler on the Chagny does look very cool, especially for pizza.

Good luck with your decision and have fun with picking your color!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Doesn't the chagny have the same size oven as a cluny? 1/2 sheet pans fit fine in my ovens. Our color is burgundy and we love it!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

joeboldt:

Yes, I think the chagny and cluny ovens are the same size. What dimensions are your sheet pans? I tried mine on the Cluny at AC and they were squeezed up and rubbing against the sides of the oven with no air to circulate around them. I think mine are the standard 1/2 sheet size, 13" x 18". Maybe mine are bigger? Maybe mine are disfigured from years of use (they are looking a little weathered these days).

christy


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Christy,
Mine are 13 x 18, and there is way over an inch on each side. Maybe you were looking at the convection oven?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hello LaCanche owners! I'm going to order the Sully 2200 (still working out configuration) in the color "olive". I'm wondering about the style of the LaCanche perhaps clashing with the Sub-Zero Pro48 refrigerator and the American Range Legacy double oven. The ovens will be closer to the LaCanche than the refrigerator. I know that I can add a panel to the refrigerator, but I really love the look of the Sz Pro48 with the glass door in stainless.

Here is a link that might be useful: American Range Double Ovens


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Not a Sully 2200, just sowing the color olive, which I love, love love!!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Joebolt: I'll check with Nicole at AC. I cooked on a cluny at AC but perhaps it did have a convection - that would solve the mystery. Given the dimensions of the Cluny ovens are 16" wide it makes more sense that a 13" wide sheet pan would fit with 1" on each side. I know I tried mine in the cluny oven and it didn't fit. I measured them to make sure I didn't have a different size (they are just under 13" and 18") so there is something wierd here. It's good to know yours fit.

Mariaswell: your color pick is beautiful and I don't see any clash between the range and your sz refrigerator. I think the bars on the fridge tie in beautifully with the bars on the lacanche. And both have plenty of stainless. While the LC can be traditional I also think it looks gorgeous is more modern kitchens. They are so beautiful they can work just about anywhere! Congratulations on picking your range!!!


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ChristyMcK, just tonight I had the opportunity to "test drive" a Lacanche Volnay, and one of the (many) things I made was a pizza. I just did it in the main electric oven, no convection, with the pizza placed on the included pastry sheet. I baked it for 10 minutes at 500 degrees, and it turned out perfectly.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi Everyone,

I had my first service issue with my Lacanche which was disheartening since my range has only been in since September 2013.

My gas oven began having problems related to the pilot assembly. Eric in Service was wonderful, but it took a month and a half before the issue was resolved and I was able to use my gas oven again. During that time I had to have a number of phone conversations with Eric to try to diagnose the problem, send photos to him of the problem, have my husband try to fix the problem by watching the service videos, and eventually try to find a service person in my area. It was difficult finding someone in my area that was willing to service the range. Eric ended up having to call someone in my area and provide him with the service videos that he needed to fix the problem. It turns out that the range needed a new pilot assembly as the original was bad. This service person informed me that while these ranges are easy to fix in theory they are not always so easy in reality. Unlike most of todays ranges whose parts are mainly assemblies, Lacanche consists of parts inside of parts, etc. and most service guys don't want to mess with that stuff these days especially when they have to wait for and get the parts from Art Culinaire. Keep in mind that this is just one service persons opinion, but I wanted to inform especially those who have not yet purchased their range. Maybe call around and find a service person ahead of time that you can have lined up so that you know if there is ever a problem you will have someone to help.
It was disheartening to have a problem and then be without an oven for so long. We spent a lot of money for this range and one would expect that service issues wouldn't be such a time consuming hassle.
With that said, I still love my range, but hope beyond hope that I do not have further service issues like this one or worse!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

joeboldt: The plot thickens. Apparently the cluny was a regularly cluny oven - not convection. It's weird that it didn't fit my 1/2 sheet pan but it fits in yours. What year is yours? I wonder if they made changes. I heard back from Nicole but am following up with Victoria on this.

achauer: Thanks for reporting back! That's great news re: the pizza. I continue to fluctuate on a gas versus an electric oven. It's hard to forgo the broiler on the electric oven. Was there anything that surprised you during your test drive? For me, I was really surprised by the power of the gas cooktop - of course I'm currently cooking on a coil electric range that's 50 years old so maybe it shouldn't have! But it certainly convinced me that I don't need 25k open burners offered by the blue star. I just met with our first contractor and things didn't work out quite as hoped (our old dumbwaiter cannot be readily turned into a space for an extra 24" oven) so I may have to rethink the configuration and range choice. We are meeting with another contractor later this week. Did you boil water? How much and how long did it take?

ctkristin: I was so sorry to hear of your unfortunate repair and glad that you shared. I think sharing all experiences ends up being most valuable. It is definitely food for thought. We are in western WA so I think if something went wrong we'd have Art Culinaire just a few miles away but still, I'd rather have no problems at all early on in ownership at this price point.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ChristyMcK, our cluny is from 2006.

Just a note about pizza. We have a gas and electric oven and make pizza in both, with terrific results. Just get a heavy stone and preheat for an hour. Our electric oven has a setting "High", which comes right after 550. I assume it means always on, but have never checked.

ctkristin: sorry, also to hear about your issues. That would P me Off no end. It surprises me they wouldn't/couldn't find a better resolution to that given the cost of the stoves.


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Shipping charges?

Hello all- We seriously appreciate being able to read all of the detailed postings here on GW and are so impressed with the photos shared! We are trying to make the decision between a BlueStar 48" Platinum, Chagny 1400, and Cluny 1400. We've all but ruled out Wolf or Viking. Can anyone weigh in what to expect with shipping charges? TIA!


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For the Volnay (39" range) I think it's about $1525 if you air ship but $900 if you ship by sea. By air you get the range in about 3 months - by sea about 5 months. I think the 1400 models weigh a couple hundred pounds more than the Volnay so may cost a bit more to ship. We'll probably do the slow boat.

Have you seen both ranges in person? The blue star and Lacanche are such different styles. I saw the 36" blue star and despite the 22k burners, just didn't feel the love for it I feel for the Lacanche. Others have felt the opposite.

Art Culinaire has a network of individuals willing to share their ranges so if you aren't near a show room I'd definitely contact them. They are super nice and helpful and could also give you accurate shipping fee$. Good luck with your decision!


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Hi ctkirstin, I love your kitchen! I am currently trying to decide which Lacanche to buy. I'm leaning towards the Chagny 1400, Cluny 1400, or the Citeaux. I'm not sure I want a convection oven, so I will probably go with one of the first two. The range hood you have in your kitchen is exactly as I image mine to look. Can I please ask you if the hood (before the plaster was added) was built on site or was it something you purchased and then had plastered?
Thank you!

Thank you to everyone who has shared information about these beautiful ranges, it has been very helpful!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi Cori4137,

Thanks! I understand your feeling about a convection oven. My previous oven was convection and in the ten years that I had it I never used the convection feature so it wasn't even a consideration when choosing this range.
As for the range hood. It is a Modernaire 1400 CFM liner with the external blower located on the roof which I highly recommend. It is very quiet, yet powerful. The decorative liner cover was built on site. We used antique beams from an old barn along with plywood. Then we primed and plastered it. That is it. Simple, but works for a rustic look. Here is a close up for you if you decide to build something like it. Have fun!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Cori4137,

I can't figure out how to attach more than one photo in a post ! Anyway, Here is a different pic. Hope I have helped in your decision. Can't wait to see what you choose. Please keep me posted.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi ctkristin,

Thank you for the extra photos and for letting me know how the hood was built! It is exactly what I've been imagining, including using the rustic wood. I also appreciate your input on the fan and the convection oven. I will be looking into the fan and inset today. Your whole kitchen is beautiful, I love the floors too! Thank you again and I will keep you posted as to which Lacanche I choose. Best wishes.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Amazing, when many folks are looking for ways to make kitchens safer, that we see all this discussion about dangerous and expensive cooking appliances.

Hopefully none of the above posters have either young kids or old folks around, that could get on the "Business End" of one of those "French top things" or whatever they call them!!!!

Like posted in some other threads, "Get into the Current Century""~~~~~Buy induction and a good oven.
Such a combo will "Blow the doors off" this "Exotic Stuff", ~~~speed, control, cleaning!!!!etc, You Name it!!!!

Gary


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Ach, don't be such a proud member of the nanny state, dodge59: how will kids ever learn to survive if they don't learn basic skills like, oh, I dunno - "don't touch the oven, sweetie, or you'll burn your fingers. Oh, you burnt your fingers? Poor ickle ting, you won't do it again, now, will you."

Nothing that a Band-Aid and a kiss can't make better.

I have an Aga, but I'd be just as happy with a Lacanche. They're fantastic for cooking, and a darn sight prettier than induction (which, by the way, has been around nearly 100 years - nothing "current century" about that, eh!).


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dodge59,

While I respect that some people prefer induction to French tops, I'll give you a few reasons why I've chosen the Lacanche over an induction top:

1. I have some clay pots that won't work on induction. A lot of people aren't aware of this, but the mica in the clay interacts with the acidity in foods and makes them taste sweeter/less bitter. Since I cook a lot of tomato-based dishes on the stovetop, I wouldn't give up my clay pots for the world.
2. I also prefer to use copper pots. I love the look and the function of them. I also love that I supported a talented artisan who makes them by hand in a back alley of a little village in Tuscany. I can't use them on an induction cooktop.
3. I have a lot of little kids running around my kitchen but none of them have ever burnt themselves on the oven or the cooktop. I don't know if the kids you're around resemble monkeys, but otherwise I don't see the issue with them burning themselves on the cooktop. If the cooktop is hot, I'm using it and if I'm using it, they're not climbing around on my countertops to get near my cooktop. The outside of the oven doesn't get hot enough to burn sensitive toddler body parts, and the door is too heavy for them to open. Obviously, I'm there when it is open.
4. This is a personal preference, but induction tops just don't have the wow factor that the LaCanche has. Also, if it's not gas, I don't want it. I actually refused to buy a house once because it was an induction cooktop rather than gas. Again, personal preference, but I prefer the speed and control of gas over induction any day of the week. I also dislike cleaning induction. It seems to behave like stainless steel, a drop of water or a handprint makes it look dirty and then it's time to pull out the special cleaner and scrub away...

Just my two cents.


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Great post dodge59, but I have to chime in and agree with FemFoodie, if I am in the kitchen and working at the stove my kids are not running around the kitchen or near the stove. That is the rule.
Besides, if I ran around trying to make my kitchen ( and if you are going that far then it must extend to the entire house, no) free of anything that the kids or grandma could "get on the business end of," I would be crazy. All outlets would have to be moved to ceiling height, all closets and bathrooms would have to be locked at all times to ensure that things like curling irons, razors, hair dryers, and toilets would not become dangerous play toys. Forget about my fire place or the wood stove that heats my house 6 months out of the year. Goodbye to them. I would have to get rid of all of my lamps. Have you ever touched a lit bulb? Those suckers BURN! The kitchen would have to be on total lock down. Can't risk the kids or grandma getting into the forks or the knives. Heck, if I think about it I would have to get rid of the cabinets and drawers. They could really smoosh little fingers.
IMHO, the answer to kitchen safety isn't an induction cooktop. It is supervision.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Cori4137,

You're Welcome. I am glad to help. There are so many fun, but stressful decisions to be made. It can get overwhelming, right?

Do you have an idea of the color Lacanche that you want? My first love was Ivory, but when I saw it in the NYC showroom it didn't excite me. If we had it to do again we would get the British Racing Green.
I hope you share your progress with us regarding your range decision and your kitchen. Best of luck and have fun!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ctkristin,

So many decisions! I seem to change my mind on exactly which unit I want almost daily!

My biggest concern is wondering if I will need a separate oven. I have four children and we entertain a lot. I don't want to add another oven though. I cooked on a two Agas for a couple of years and they both had four small ovens and that was fine. So, I really don't know why I'm so worried. Probably because I need to get it right as I don't plan to replace this range again!

I love the British Racing Green, that was the color of the Aga's I used in England! In fact, one was in a beautiful cream kitchen that looked very much like yours, including the stone floors. I also like the Provence Yellow. But, it seems I'm mostly drawn to the kitchens with the Black.

I have awhile to decide and I am hoping to see them in person first. Thanks again and I will keep you posted!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

@ Cori4137 - what colour were the cabinets in the UK kitchens?

The downside of a British Racing Green Aga, we've discovered, is that it's a bit of a pita to find cupboards that sit comfortably with it. I didn't want wood (already have white oak floors and wooden counters), and custom wasn't in the budget, so we've gone with Ikea's Ramsjo white.

If I were buying a new Aga, I'd go with black (or the pewter), cream or red before BRG! It's a gorgeous colour as a stand-alone, but somewhat limiting when it comes to everything else.

I do prefer Lacanche's colour options to those on offer from Aga, as I think they're more creative, and more likely to work well with other colours in the kitchen.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

HI Why_not_me,

To answer your questions, the cabinets in the first UK house where cream with a darker greenish brown glaze and the second kitchen had creamy yellow cabinets. Both looked very good with the BRG Aga, but I can see where the color could be limiting.

The first Aga didn't have cabinets right up against it and the second had small ones flanking each side. I believe both kitchens were most likely custom designed as there were no issues with the doors hitting the Aga of vise versa.

The traditional Aga was my first choice, but I couldn't justify leaving it running all year and the dealer here in the US didn't recommend turning it off like we were told to do in the UK. Aga does have a few other models, but they don't look as nice as the traditional and don't seem to have as good reviews.

Best wishes!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Cory4137,
Sadly, I have never cooked on an Aga so I cannot comment on how much food you can cook in that over the Lacanche. I lusted after one for YEARS and it is still the only stove that I would consider outside of the Lacanche. Such beauties, they are. With that said, maybe I can give you some food for thought regarding getting a second oven. The Chagny ovens are small. The largest cookie sheet that I can use is 15x10. When baking I can get three sheets in the oven, but due to the tight quarters I have to diligently rotate the sheets so they cook evenly. Not a big deal for me, as I am not an avid baker.
As for cooking, you can get a lot done with the smaller ovens thanks to the fact that you can hold food in the warming oven while you cook other things. I think that it was Flevy that mentioned that when she cooked Thanksgiving dinner one oven was occupied with the turkey leaving the other oven to handle the side dishes. Tricky, but not impossible. It just takes planning.
I think Flevy had mentioned that a wall oven would have been nice. Am I correct, Flevy?
I have learned not to think of the petite broiler as another oven. While technically it is ( since it can cook at any temp), it is very small and as a result a casserole tends to burn or overcook before the inside is done. Even at lower temps the bottom gets too browned, as the food is so close to the floor of the oven. For me it works best as a pizza oven and a broiler.
So, if it were me and I wanted the best of all worlds, I would have gotten a wall oven. If you entertain often, a wall oven will enable you to do everything that you need to do with ease. You will not have to figure out ahead of time if the dutch oven dish that you plan to use will fit in the oven (I have a few that take up the entire oven right to the top and right up to the sides!) or make adjustments if it doesn't. You can just pop that one in the regular size wall oven.
On an every day basis, the Chagny 1400 feeds my family of five effortlessly and it does the same when I entertain. It shines. It just takes planning due to smaller ovens. If you can find a way to cook on one, I would. Everyone cooks differently and has different cooking/ entertaining priorities. I have learned that I would have loved an extra wall oven. Can I do without it, yes (and I will!LOL). But, if I had known then what I know now, I would have added the wall oven. I hope this long-winded post has helped. :0) No one wants to get to the end of a kitchen remodel and find regrets!


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Good morning, Ctkristin!, Thank you for taking the time to educate me on the ovens and how they work for you! I do need to really think more about how we cook before making a decision on the exact range and the extra oven. I'm not a baker, but one of my daughters does bake brownies and cupcakes frequently. But, other than the big holidays and a couple of Sunday roast dinners, I don't use the oven for much. But, it seems like an extra one would be helpful. I also value your thoughts on the petite oven. We do make homemade pizza and it would be helpful to have a small
oven for it.

My husband and I spoke last night about making a trip to NYC to see the models and I think we'll do that this summer. I plan to talk to Elise first to see if there are any ambassadors closer to MI. I also showed my husband the extra photos and the information you sent on your range hood. He was most impressed and asked me to thank you for being so helpful!

You have been very kind to share so much with me.

Have a great day!

Corie


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Help! Can't decide on a colour! I love the Provence Yellow, absolutely love, love, love it, but am considering the Sully and think it may be too overpowering for a stove this size. I have noticed that certain colours tend to suit some sizes better. The other options we are considering are anthracite and burgundy red. Any thoughts???


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

If it fits-in with the rest of your home, a Sully in Provence Yellow would look sensational! I think the success of your color choice is more impacted by your taste, design and the items in the rest of your home (including paint, fabrics, rugs, flooring, china, accessories, textures, wood tones and hardware) than it is by the actual size of your range. Looking at photos online, I see stunning "power-colored" Lacanches that are both small like Rully and big like Sully.

Do you want your range to be the focus or "heart" of your kitchen? Or would you prefer your range to be a more subtle accent? Stand or imagine that you're standing in your kitchen with your new range behind you. Pan in hand, you're about to turn around and begin cooking - which color are you most excited to see when you turn around? Which color will you be most thrilled to see each morning? Which color feels most natural to you? That's your winner.


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Thank you soooo much for your culinary-Lacanche words of wisdom, and I will definitely try this!! I am almost there with decided so hopefully this exercise will seal the deal!!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

MayioKonidaris, It is a tough decision! I go back and forth with it too. The Provence Yellow is beautiful and so classic. It is also one of several that I'm considering. But, the big question is will I still love it in 10-20 years? Good luck and let us know what you decide.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thank you Trinkette for your words of wisdom regarding choosing a Lacanche colour and to this post, 'cos today was 'd-day', the deal was sealed! We have ordered the Cluny 1400 with two extra 4 kw burners with the flat griddle plate, instead of the electric plancha. Cori4137 we went for it and decided the Provence Yellow with the brass finish!!! I decided on the color I love was the way to go! Each time I see this color it makes me feel good and I think this is important regardless of what I feel in 10-20 years, because who knows where each and everyone of us will be in this timeframe - hopefully in our homes enjoying our lives and our Lacanche of course...BUT life is too short to worry into the future!! Now we have to wait 18 weeks for its arrival, but a lot of renovating happening between now and then! Will share a lovely story next time about what else helped us along our decision making path here in Down Under!!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Did anybody see the stainless Cluny on eBay now ? $4400 but you have to pick it up in NYC. Needs a good cleaning, but looks okay.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Congratulations, MayioKonidaris! Glad you went with the yellow. You are right about not worrying about the future, good advice! Looking forward to hearing about it when it arrives.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thank you Cori4137 and wish you well with your decision making, hope to read what you decide?! After visiting a local cafe in Melbourne yesterday morning that has a Vougeot Provence Yellow at the very front of the restaurant and meeting the chef owner this helped us with our decision. This showed us not only how beautiful the colour looked and how well it matched the diverse restaurant decor but also how well made and durable the Lacanche is! It is wonderful to have the opportunity to meet and speak to a restauranteur who is so passionate about Lacanche and its various functions!!


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I am about to pull the trigger on ordering a Chagny - my only lingering concern is how low to the ground the electric oven is (the one under the petite oven). Are there any Chagny owners out there who can speak to this - has it been problematic at all?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

We are a trigger happy bunch right now, aren't we! I'm about to pull the trigger on the Volnay - French Blue - Classique Top - Oven (Gas or Electric still TBD). All very exciting!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

MayioKonidaris, congratulations! I applaud you for following your heart and ordering your range in stunning Provence Yellow - I know you'll love it. YAY! Do NOT forget to come back and thrill us with photos after your range is installed.

Trigger-happy achauer and ChristyMcK, I'm happy to hear you're almost there, and I'm excited for you both. Hopefully, achauer, someone can chime in regarding the user-friendliness of the Chagny oven underneath the petite broiler.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi achauer!
Congrats on deciding on a Chagny.
The bottom oven under the petite broiler is pretty low to the ground. When I first used it I was a bit shocked. To give specifics, when you open the door all of the way it is about 5 1/2 inches from the floor. The very lowest rack setting is about 8 inches from the floor and the very top rack setting is about 12 1/2 inches from the floor. I hope this helps you visualize the oven.
It is not problematic per se, but when I have a really large french oven that is heavy with food and needs to go on the very bottom rack I have to maneuver quite carefully to get the food in the oven because I can't just bend over and slide the food in(without throwing out my back!). I have to squat all of the way to the floor to slide the food in the oven. My husband thinks that someday when perhaps my hips and knees aren't as forgiving, I will have to say goodbye to my lovely Lacanche! I can't worry about that. I am sure that for some people this could be a deal breaker, which is why I think that getting as many honest opinions from users is so important. After all this is an expensive investment and one wants to be completely happy with their purchase. I have learned to adjust to the very low height of the oven and see it as part of the quirky charm of a Lacanche Chagny range. Hope this helps.


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Achauer, I took a pic in hopes that it might help you out. Here is the oven under the petite broiler. You can see how close to the floor the open door is. I put my largest french oven in there. Perhaps this can give you a sense of the height of it all.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ctkristin --have you figured out how to cook with the petite broiler yet? I'm still burning food in it :(


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Hi Flevy! How have you been? I think of you every time I attempt to work out the kinks with the petite broiler, knowing that someone else out there feels my pain!
No, I have not figured out how to use the petite broiler as a "regular" oven. I only seem to be successful at making cast iron pizza or using the oven as a broiler. I even have to keep a close eye on french fries. The outside of food just seems to go from uncooked to black in an instant.
It is very frustrating, especially since I really enjoy cooking with this range. I have gotten used to all of the other quirks, but this petite oven vexes me!
What have you tried to cook in it lately?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ctkristin, I didn't ask for it, however, your description and photo of the Chagny oven is most helpful (great photo, BTW). And achauer, that was a more significant question than I imagined! Many thanks for the question and the response.

Also, earlier comments you all made regarding your frustrations with the petite broiler - which at one time I thought I'd surely want for pizzas and smaller dishes - convinced me to look pretty hard at my true "must haves." I do appreciate your candor. Still, there must be someone out there who has gotten the hang of it, yes?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Thank you trinkette for your inspiration and wonderful encouragement. I will definitely post photos down the track. As for the Chagny and the broiler/griller, I have heard from our local Lacanche importer who have this model, that it is very useful particularly as an extra (smaller) oven to either warm plates, food, make pizzas and simply to use it as a griller! We considered it before choosing the Cluny 1400, because we are used to having a separate grill and were concerned about having it inside the oven. But for me, the idea of having to get down low to use one of the ovens was the deciding factor, especially as the ageing process sets in! Deciding this was a relief, which allowed me to move on from the idea of having a separate grill. It is truly a personal and individual choice, but I think ctkristin's experience is worth consideringl! Good luck and take as much time as you can with your final decision!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

We pulled the trigger! So excited!!! We will be the recipients of a french blue Volnay with classique cooktop and electric oven. We'll have a separate 24" steam oven (TBD). Sounds like it will be on the boat before the August holiday. Thanks to all of you for your responsiveness and your input. Choosing the electric over the gas oven was the hardest part - In the end I couldn't pass up the flexibility that the convection and high heat broiler offered. It feels great to have the decision finally made (my DH thinks so to ;)!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ctkristin - very helpful, thank you! Although crouching down is easy for me now at 43, in 10-20 years it could be a lot more difficult. I was envisioning using the petite broiler for pizzas, vegetable roasting, toasting nuts and bread (perhaps with pizza stone kept in to even out temp). However, it is sounding like the challenge of using the petite broiler and the inconvenient height of the electric oven may give me cause to go with the Cluny instead. Definitely food for thought!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

ChristyMcK, the Volnay is a great choice! Sounds like you went electric, hence more "modern" all around, wrapped beautifully in a traditional package. Can't wait to hear your impressions of the French Blue color when you see it in your home. Also, please do report on how you like the electric oven. Congratulations on you decision.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

So glad to have read about these stoves on this forum! Doing a very extensive kitchen overhaul in our midcentury modern 60's home and was on the Wolff path until I fell in love with the yellow SULLY 2200!! So now that I've ordered it I have to completely redo the rest of the kitchen to make it fit. Thinking to keep everything else pretty minimal...


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

trinkette: Thanks! I will definitely let you know about the electric oven, but I'm feeling very comfortable about the decision so that's reassuring that it was the right choice for us. I have a hard time imagining one could go wrong with any Lacanche range, but I'm already so biased! :)

zuza204: Congrats on your range! That Sully 2200 will keep you busy for ages and the yellow is just a gorgeous color. We are doing a few minor changes to our 1956 midcentury kitchen, but are leaving it largely untouched. It'd be fun to see photos of Lacanche ranges in both a midcentury kitchen (ours) and a midcentury modern kitchen (yours?). The Lacanche ranges are so versatile I think they go with all sorts of kitchens. Good luck with your remodel!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Zuza204, a big yellow Sully sounds yummy AND deserving of a fab kitchen overhaul!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Has anyone ordered a Lacanche range in a CUSTOM color?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Trinkette, I have just inquired about aurbergine after reading the threads going back to 2002. I think that would now be a custom color? Anyway, I'm not even sure I will like it, but it is intriguing.

Going back that far in the threads has also helped me make my mind on the exact range. It will be a Citeaux with both a burner and a traditional plate. After reading comments from other families of 6, I have become convinced that the Citeaux will work well for my family and my
entertaining needs.

There was also some very useful information on the performance of the
ranges. Serveral people posted on oven temperatures, baking, roasting,
simmering, use of the French plate, high temperature searing, stir frying,
etc. There were also several who went into great detail on pot and pan
sizes and what would fit in the oven and the stove top. I found it all very useful.

The color is yet to determined, but I have at least now narrowed it down to
just a few choices. I have until the end of the summer to make a final
decision.

Are you any closer to a decision?

In the mean time, I am hoping to see the range in person in Michigan or within driving distance. Elisa has someone, but nothing has been
arranged yet, I just hope the owner will let me come and have a look! I am
planning to visit NYC, but that won't happen until closer to my order date.

ChristiMcK and Zuza204 - Congratulations on your orders! I look forward
to seeing photos (hopefully)!

Best Regards,
Corie


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Corie, Great news regarding your decision to purchase a Citeaux! Please keep us abreast of your progress in choosing a color - is Aubergine on your short list?

I know it isn't advertised, however, it is a known Lacanche color so I don't think of Aubergine as being a "custom" color. Perhaps, I'd call it "semi-custom?" Actually, I once had a sample of Aubergine in my hot little hands - the color is exquisite. Quite timeless, and it would work in so many settings! I'm considering it, as well as a few more readily available colors. However, I am also thinking about coming up with a color of my own ... I have a two or three specific hues in mind.

I know Lacanche can match just about any color one would want; however, I don't recall anyone on GW ever going with a custom color, that's why I asked. In fact, I don't think I've even seen a photo of a custom color at all. Hummm, must inquire ...

Yes, I agree, the older threads are extremely helpful.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

They should ALL be burgundy!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

Spoken like a true proud parent, joeboldt!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

I got an email from Elisa she said the aubergine is a custom color. The color up charge is twice the regular color up charge. Based on how the color was description I've ruled it out.

May I ask what color hues you are considering?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 43

It was years ago when I inquired about the Aubergine - before our earlier house project (another house altogether) imploded. I knew Aubergine was more than the normal colors offered, but didn't remember that it was priced double like the custom colors (which I HAVE priced recently). If I decide it's my best color choice - the Aubergine is lovely and I can see it working in just about any kind of setting - I'll be sure to go for it and consider the additional cost as money well-spent.

Corie, I'm considering several colors, including Frangipane, Vert Sologne, Ivory and some of the blues. However, so far I'm not settled on the perfect compliment to my other color and design choices in the house. Also, design/material decisions for the kitchen and family room/dining areas are still underway, so I have plenty of time to ponder options, including coming-up with a color of my own.

FWIW, the color I might have chosen for the last house project - Provence Yellow - does not work for this house AT ALL. Maybe I should just follow joeboldt's advice and go for Burgundy!


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