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Knobs on ranges

Posted by JRC1920 (My Page) on
Mon, Jul 14, 14 at 15:20

I am new to the garden web and it seems to be a wealth of information. We are doing a remodel in CA and we were going to be purchasing a Wolf All Gas 6 burner range. I am worried about the knobs being on the front and see this as a safety issue with our triplet boys in the future. My question is does anyone know of a range with a safety feature to prevent kids from turning on the range?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Knobs on ranges

You may have already researched, but most that have gone from gas to induction would never go back to gas (maybe 10% would). Induction cooktops usually have touch control instead of knobs, and have control lock features. There are a few things you can do best on gas, but we went from Viking gas to induction, and haven't missed anything about gas. Induction responds faster to heat and to turn down, doesn't dump as much wasted heat into the kitchen, is easier to clean, can be had with timers that turn off the burners (e.g. for cooking rice). You may have to give up a few favorite pans.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

You can pull the knobs off of most ranges when you aren't using them for cleaning (and security), but kids outgrow the knob-grabbing pretty fast. Go ahead and get that range. There will be a period of inconvenience, but then you'll get your knobs back.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

Some gas ranges with electronic oven controls will shut off gas to the surface burners when you lock the oven controls. I don't know what specific models or brands do this so you are going to have to do some online researching. The downside to this feature is if the power happens to go out while the cooktop is locked, the burners will not be usable until the power comes back on since the lockout is controlled electronically.

Alternatively, you could do a drop-in cooktop and wall oven. This way the controls will not be sticking out the front.

Induction is the best for child safety not only because of the control lockout capabilities on all models but also the reduced chance of burns since the pan is all that gets hot, not the burner.

Overall, though, I agree with fori. Buy the stove you want and don't let the kids be a factor in your decision. Pull the knobs off if you need to.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

We have a Viking range in our current home and it's not just curious young kids that turn those burners on, but even a casual bump as two people pass by or my belly when I'm pregnant. Sure you can take the knobs off, but then you have a metal post to crash into. Living with this style range changed my mind about what we wanted in our new home. That's my two cents.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

"We have a Viking range in our current home and it's not just curious young kids that turn those burners on, but even a casual bump as two people pass by or my belly when I'm pregnant"

That sounds like yet another Viking problem, not a general problem with gas ranges. That would not be possible on any of the gas ranges I've ever owned. They've all required you to push the knob down a fair amount before turning, and I don't see how a bump could accomplish both actions.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

Back when my kids were in grade school we had a Viking gas range. We also had an electric skillet, which happened to have a plastic lid.

One evening we cooked something in the electric skillet, which was next to the range. After cooking we placed the plastic cover to the skillet on the back burner of the range, because it was convenient, and left it there.

The next day, when my wife and I were out, our middle son put a pan of raviolis on the front burner, turned it on and went about his business. As you can probably guess, he actually turned on the rear burner.

This was before we had cell phones, so imagine our surprise when we saw the fire trucks in front of the house when we got home. Fortunately the fire got put out while it was confined to the stove top, although the smoke damage was extensive.

We have induction now. I din't buy it to prevent fires, but if we still had small children in the house it would be a consideration.

BTW our middle son is the older of twins. I can hardly imagine what triplets are like. Best of luck to you!


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RE: Knobs on ranges

Thank you all so much for your comments and suggestions. I will look into an induction cooktop but I kind of have my head set on getting a gas cooktop.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

You may want to look into safety knob covers. I see them in some homes with small children.
I added a link from Baby's R US.

Don't know if they make these that will fit a Wolf knob though. You may want to do a internet search.

Here is a link that might be useful: Safety Knob Covers


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RE: Knobs on ranges

I have a CC rangetop with two young kids running around. My DD at age 3.5 years old did grab a knob and turn it once while standing next to me. She didn't do any harm, and we had a quick talk about the knobs and why she shouldn't touch them. No issue at all in the intervening year. I accidentally lean against a knob a fair amount myself without realizing it until I hear the igniter clicking on a burner. Oops!

IMHO on my soap box, I feel like the baby industry has gone a bit overboard with all the baby proofing items on the market. We are scared into believing that every single item in our home is life-threatening to our helpless children so we must somehow wrap/block/store/clamp/latch/lock/secure the entire house down. We baby proofed a few key dangerous places (like where cleaning products were stored) in our house when our first child was born and then waited (while watching carefully) to see if our son would have issues with anything not protected. We didn't need to buy any more proofing equipment else for his safety, nor for my daughter. It was easy and cheap. My nephew, on the other hand, explores more places he shouldn't than my kids did. He requires a little extra protection. My point is that your three munchkins may never even look at your range knobs, let alone fondle them. Disembarking from soap box now.

I have seen plastic shields for ranges that are installed under the knobs and slope upwards so that kids cannot reach up to knobs, but so that parents can reach in from above and manipulate the knobs. You might check into that option. I'd much rather have the cooking tools I want long-term and deal with some short term kid protection issues than to buy an appliance I didn't really want. No knock against induction. I do, however, love my gas flame. :)


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RE: Knobs on ranges

Before passing up the chance to switch to induction now, be very sure you understand what you'd be giving up, and how appliances are trending. As usual, the US is trailing kitchen and design trends in Europe, but the floodgates are finally beginning to crack here. Just google the threads -- and yes, these folks are experts. They will tell you things appliance salesmen cannot yet wrap their heads around.

If safety is a concern, induction has no competition. It is certainly the equal to gas in terms of speed and it's probably cheaper to operate. And in ease of cleanup, it is light years ahead of gas. Every time I use mine, I feel Ike doing the V8 forehead slap, and shudder at the thought of that cobalt blue Aga I so longed for. Go with gas, and in ten years, it might well feel as if you've got a 1963 Fleetwood parked in your kitchen. Big, expensive, and to some eyes, still beautiful, but nonetheless a little old fashioned and requiring a lot of maintenance. (No slam on the Fleetwood -- it was a great car and I cried when we sold ours.)


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RE: Knobs on ranges

Will an induction cooktop still be functioning after 10 years though? I'm not impressed with modern electronics, even though I replaced a 1983 induction cooktop with a modern one in my last remodel. (It worked great still but was a weird size.) Somehow I doubt the new one will last as long.

I like induction. I like gas. I'd have a '63 gas stove in my kitchen if pilot lights didn't bother me. :P

I don't think you need to worry too much about the kids, whatever you decide on. I DO think people with kids that don't have a fence around their pool are idiots though.

For what it's worth, I started a fire on my induction cooktop. It can be done.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

By fall this year, a knob that has a locking mechanism to resist little toddlers and prevent accidental turn on's should be on the market. I think this will give you the peace of mind your looking for and allow you to purchase a gas range with knobs on the front.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

By fall this year, a knob that has a locking mechanism to resist little toddlers and prevent accidental turn on's should be on the market. I think this will give you the peace of mind your looking for and allow you to purchase a gas range with knobs on the front.


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RE: Knobs on ranges

After a few personal setbacks, my kitchen renovation is being taken off the back burner [pun intended]. My wife and I are still sticking with the gas range, the Capital Culinarian more specifically, and have two younger kids, aka 'our little chefs' who sometimes get over zealous with helping.

We have thankfully been in earshot when they are igniting the burners so some sort of safety feature would take a HUGE weight off of my chest.

Does anyone have first hand experience with safety knobs? trevorlawson, do you know if these knobs will be compatible with the Capital range of stove?


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RE: Knobs on ranges

I have owned a Wolf all gas range and can report that the burners are not a problem. My child and other children visiting have never, ever, even once accidentally turned them on. Nor have I and I cook like crazy.
The way a Wolf is built is not the same as a Viking, so the experience Viking owners have may not transfer to a Wolf. I won't say more to avoid the old arguments about Wolf vs Viking. Get what you want any enjoy the heck out of it!


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RE: Knobs on ranges

Ontherocks.... The knob will fit ranges already in the homes and new ranges and range tops from future purchases,

Designed to fit .....Wolf, Viking, BS, Capital, American, Dacor, Electrolux & Thermador, along with numerous outdoors BBQ's


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