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Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Posted by vatobk (My Page) on
Tue, Jun 10, 14 at 15:56

So, we are more than half way through our home reno. Thanks to help from this forum, we have decided on the Bluestar 36" range. Next order of business is the hood. I would like an integrated hood built into the cabinets. Is that sufficient for a range with this type of power? The cabinet designer noted that they recommended a larger hood for 36" ranges and generally recommend integrated hoods only for cooktops. For those of you that have purchased the BS 36" range, what amount of CFMs do you have and, is it sufficient?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

I have a 36" RNB and a 1200 cfm hood. Got a matching color one thru BS. You might not need 1200 but I'm glad I have it as I do some hi heat searing and wok cooking and it clears the air pretty well.


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Just put in mine (wall mounted chimney hood with external vent) with 900CFM. I was leaning towards the 1200 CFM, but felt it might be overkill since its unlikely that I will be using all the burners simultaneously all the time. So far, it functions exceptionally well.

When I visiting a local high end appliance store, the salesperson told me that anything over 600 should be ok. I also read that a handily calculation is to add the total BTU for all burners from the cooktop and divide by 100 for the CFM requirement. I am sure that is just a rule of thumb, rather an a scientific measurement.

The most important aspects are:

1) Size of the hood should be at least the width of the range, if not slightly larger.

2) Deep 24" canopy

3) The backsplash material behind the stove needs to be non-flammable such as tile or stone

4) External venting is essential

5) Kitchen needs to have the ability to open up to the rest of the house somehow to reduce the air pressure differential due to the powerful hood. Lack of air pressure can lead to insufficient ignition and Carbon Monoxide generation. If not, try and add a makeup air mechanism into the kitchen or your furnace.

Adding a picture in case you are interested.


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

36" RNB with griddle, with a 36"x 27" Prizer 1000 cfm remote. Adequate, but just marginal when cooking super smokey meals. Starting to think you can't have too many cfms! Having 1400, and only using them when needed would be my choice if I did it again.


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Also I would suggest a 42" hood for a 36" range, helps capture the effluent better.


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Sonny_h,

I love that hood, what brand/model is it? Happy with it?


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Having too many CFMs is definitely a bad thing. Ventilation is oversold all the time. There is no way you need 1200 CFM unless you are indoor grilling. Everyone talks about how they want a quiet hood all the time, and the best way to achieve that is to move less air. There is no whiz bang hood that will magically move all that air without making any sound. Also, the issue of makeup air comes into play. If your ventilation and makeup air (or lack thereof) is spec'd by a clueless person, you could end up filling your home with chimney soot and/or carbon monoxide. Capture area is key! Pro style cooking should have a hood 6 inches wider than the cooking surface at the very least. If you have 1000+ CFM on a 36" range and you find it's not effective enough, you have some serious installation problems.

This post was edited by hvtech42 on Wed, Jun 11, 14 at 16:48


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

bobelicious -

Thanks! The hood is from Proline (http://www.prolinerangehoods.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=32_46&products_id=174) -

I did a LOT of research both online and in one of the upscale appliance wholesalers locally. Proline hoods are much cheaper than most other hoods I found for equivalent performance. The reviews were mixed with lots of comments about mixed experience with customer service, etc. However, I have had a great experience with them so far. Hood arrived quickly, without any damage. All parts were delivered, no damage. It was easy to install, and does a great job of providing what I think is more than adequate ventilation for what I need to do. I am hoping that that there are no performance issues as time passes. Its a simple enough device and the warranty is fairly solid, so I am not overly concerned.

Will keep you posted how things evolve.


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Sonny_h,

Thanks. Looks like it's on sale now for $699 - too bad I'm not quite ready to pull the trigger. I may look at the 42" model so I have that extra capture area for when I burn stuff :-)

-Bob


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Bob:

Auto-flambe is a feature of most cooktops and the reason why excess CFM margin is desirable. 8-)

kas


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Not to minimize, but I think the concerns over carbon monoxide relative to what the hood is doing should be pretty small.

The main thing that affects CO production is how the fuel is burning. If there's enough air, as indicated by a solid blue flame, you shouldn't have to worry. And that's set by the air shutters at the various burners.

For the hood to affect the amount of air for combustion, it would have to reduce the amount of air that can get into the shutters to mix with the fuel. That isn't going to happen since the air pressure at the burner is always going to be essentially the same as at the air shutter for that burner.

For there not to be enough O2 for the fuel (i.e. enough air, but O2 concentration reduced), there's also not going to be enough O2 for you as the cook. That hints at larger problems not related to the range.

I'm not saying there aren't houses where makeup air is needed. It's not just to prevent negatively pressurizing the house, it also lets you control where that air is coming from, as opposed to via infiltration (or an open door/window).

I vote to get as big a hood as you can- we have a 42" wide by 27" deep VAH over our 36" BS RNB. We also don't necessarily turn it on when cooking unless we need to. Still here despite all that combusted natural gas (i.e. 2H2O + CO2) we've let into the house.

Yes, we have a CO monitor, as should everyone.


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

I wasn't talking about carbon monoxide coming from the cooktop. I was talking about carbon monoxide coming from other gas appliances in the house such as the water heater that could be backdrafted by removing too much air and not replacing it. Obviously this doesn't apply to every house, but it's an important consideration.


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RE: Range hood for 36" Bluestar range

Thanks so much to each of you. All very helpful information. Sounds like I should get a 42" inch hood. A local salesman tried to steer me to a 36" retractable with 500 CFMs. Sounds like that would not be a good idea!


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