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Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Posted by jerryp (My Page) on
Tue, May 29, 12 at 15:27

We are doing complete remodel of our kitchen including new hardwood floors for kitchen and dining area. I am concerned about leaks from dw/refrig. that would ruin our floor. Any suggestions for prevention measures. I know there are washing machine trays designed to prevent leaks but have not found equivalent for kitchen appliances. I am open to any ideas to protect our new floor. Thanks for your help.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

You might be able to find something to go under the dw similar to a cloths washer pan. 2nd, you could think about an alarm and/or water cutoff like for a cloths washer.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Stuff happens.....but not very often. For myself, I buy good equipment and have it installed/connected by competent people. The flood-event that probably won't happen is covered by my insurance policy and I refuse to worry further.

Otherwise, see weedmeister above.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Asolo is right. Sometimes people try to really over think things.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

I use moisture sensors that trigger shut off valves. Even given insurance, the inconvenience associated with reconstrucing the floor would be a cost I'd rather not bear.

kas


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Get a Floodstop


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

and 100sqft of extra flooring for match.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Thanks to everyone who replied. I appreciate your suggestions. It sounds like sensors and shutoff valves are the way to go.

Is it feasible to get one shutoff valve that can be triggered by sensors for both the DW and Refrig?


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

What part of the fridge do you think is going to leak? If you're thinking of the ice maker and the associated water lines, then the leak rate would be fairly low (drip drip). In this case, a sensor with alarm would be sufficient.

My friends had their new wood floor ruined by the DW. She started a load and went out to run errands. Meanwhile, the drain hose popped off / split and all of the water ran on to the floor. Floor ruined as well as the ceiling of the garage below. They replaced the wood floor with tile.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Is it feasible to get one shutoff valve that can be triggered by sensors for both the DW and Refrig?

Evidently, yes:

http://www.getfloodstop.com/product_p/xs-01.htm

XS-01
Extra FloodStop Sensor Pad
Only for use with FloodStop leak detection equipment.
Floodstop extra sensor pad to protect more than one area at a time or to "daisy chain" to extend your reach. 3' of wire.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Thanks again for all the replies. My son is the contractor and he suggested simply putting tile under both refrig. and DW and doing HW on rest of floor. That should allay my concern.

Just to explain my concern, I have had two major water leaks in past 10 years: one with washing machine and other with DW. Each required thousands of dollars of repair not to mention the inconvenience. Hence, when my wife insisted on HW in kitchen, I wanted to take some precautions.

I do agree with an earlier poster that if you do it right, you are much less at risk for damage.

Regards.

Jerry


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

One thing that I have found to be immensely useful is a sloped floor which helps me spot leaks immediately. Under the run of kitchen cabinets, I have huge size tiles (no point in having grout lines), sloped into the room not flat. The slope is nothing much, so it is easy to use the same size of adjustable legs under the cabinets. But whenever you add or change something in your plumbing, your floor tells you a few hours later if you made it watertight. Very nice feedback.

My plumbing today is designed to *show* problems now, not hide them. Compared to the invisible leaks I had 20 years ago, I now breathe dry mold free air. I figure it extends my useful life.

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FWIW, some of the Thermador / Bosch family of dishwashers have a pan under them, and a floodstop device. For me it helped decide to buy one of these. (To know more about it, go read up on the manufacturer's web site before asking questions here please.)

I installed the DW all by myself, and saw that the brass connector to the water supply hose is positioned outside the pan. Duh. Go figure. Maybe a future generation model will have that possible leak point included above the pan.

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Leaks are bad wherever they occur, and they can put mold into your house, permanently. You choose whether to reduce your risk, in certain ways. Although it is possible to overthink things and to build overkill installations, I am happy to help the analysis.


Hth


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Slightly off-topic but........Since you're concerned about the possibility of water damage from leaks, you might take a peek at your hot water tank configuration, too.

Where I live, hot water tanks are all on slabs with no drain-path in event a leak. Of course ALL of these tanks will eventually fail in the same way -- the pressure-vessel inside will crack and they'll begin to leak, usually being noticed only when saturation damage has already occurred. This has happened to me. The consequence was thousands in damage and much aggravation. The replacement tank was placed inside a pan with drain-path to the outside.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

In my system, multiple sensors for each of the various water feeds are distributed where leaks could occur for that feed.

So far, I've had no water leaks, but I have caught an overflow drip from a soap dispenser inside a cabinet.

kas


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

simply putting tile under both refrig. and DW and doing HW on rest of floor. That should allay my concern.

How will you train your water to stay on the tile?


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Smack it on the nose with a rolled-up newspaper?


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002Q8GRPG/ref=oh_details_o02_s00_i00

Not as good as an automatic shut-off system, but an inexpensive way to add information.

It's also worth being sure everyone at home knows where the water shut-off valve for the whole house is, knows where to find the wrench to turn it, and has practiced doing that. The T-shaped "street keys" that let you shut it off from a standing position are cheap and possibly worth having around.

Davidro's larger point about keeping things visible is great. While I agree about insurance and all that, water leaks are highly disruptive, both the fast catastrophic ones and the more insidious slow-drip ones.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

"....worth being sure everyone at home knows where the water shut-off valve for the whole house is, knows where to find the wrench to turn it, and has practiced doing that."

Thanks for this. Much grief would be avoided if people paid attention to that statement. Alas....like changing a tire, so few are interested. They expect everything to work all the time and don't know what to do when it doesn't.


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RE: Prevent dishwasher/refrigerator leaks on wood floor

Think about using copper tubing for the icemaker. We had friends that had a mouse or something eat through the plastic tubing while they were away for a couple of weeks and the small leak reaked havoc on their new kitchen.


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