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How Fragile is Ceran?

Posted by djdoggone (doggonedeb@me.com) on
Tue, Apr 16, 13 at 14:25

We are planning a radiant cooktop but worry about scratches, cracks and cleaning. (Induction would drive me mad; I have severe tinnitus and couldn't take any additional buzzing.)

I downloaded a couple of owner's manuals and was distressed to read that a grain of salt could cause a scratch -- that then could harbor food and make it hard to read the touch controls.

My ideal cooktop would be the top of an Aga iTotal Control. Steel, that's for me. No need to pussyfoot around. No gas. Should I just go back to coil?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

My induction is Schott Ceran - no scratches that I have noticed in the first year - but I don't drag pans across the surface.

You can scratch it and you can break it - it is glass.
I wouldn't go back to cool.

Some GW say the thermador does not buzz - but I would want to see and hear it for myself...


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

My last stove of 12 years had Schott Ceran and it was tough as nails. Occasionally, the peppermill would fall from the backsplash onto the glass top. No scratches, no problems.

I don't recommend K Ceran. My new GE Profile double oven slide in range after only two months has two scratches :(


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

Had no idea different glass = different hardiness, but makes sense. Looking at Miele 24" 3 burner radiant which is Schott, I think. Figured induction would be easier on the glass -- no heat, no burned on residue, no scraping, protective mats/paper towels allowed. Is there protection for radiants? Asbestos, right :-)


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

Induction burner areas of a smoothtop get hot under a pan after a while when the pan heat transfers to their surfaces. But it is much less intense than radiant burners.


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

In my experience (Kenmore Elite nee Electrolux Icon 36-inch induction cooktop), almost all buzzing occurs at the pan base, and seems to be related to how well bonded the pan layers are. For example, a Revere pan I have that is just drawn stainless steel of the magnetic variety (probably a 400 series) never buzzes because it has no layers. A Demeyere layered base (induction ready) tea kettle never buzzed until overheated by someone. Now it sometimes buzzes but I haven't discovered any correlation with any other conditions.

Note that I cook with thre small silicon pads stabilizing the pans a mm or so above the surface, so rattling between Ceran and pan is not a factor for me, but could be in "normal" use.

Potentially there could be buzzing from inadequately stabilized coils under the Ceran, but that should show up in showroom testing unless the quality control unit-to-unit is particularly bad.

kas


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

Thanks so much for the feedback on induction. It was my first choice as rheumatoid arthritis is taking its toll on my hands, making cleaning very difficult. But the arthritis makes me hesitant to sign on with a technology that requires heavy cookware. I'm surprised Revere ware works (I assume it is the lighter-weight version now made overseas.). When talking induction most people suggest le Creuset -- beyond my weight class :-)

From my reading it is very difficult to determine if induction buzzes and clicks. I've read posts where one person returns a cooktop for noise that another person says is silent. We are rural so showrooms are several hours' drive but is doable if I had a single manufacturer to test. Then there's the worry that my cooktop might be noisy but within spec so the manufacturer refuses to fix or take it back if it is intolerable for me.


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

The Revereware pan in question is old. It was the only one of many drawn pans we had that was magnetic. I never bothered to research what classes of Revereware pans were originally made that would lead to this result. These are distinguishable by the less shiny stainless they use, and by magnetic testing.

Modern triple layer pans from various sources are heavier than their ancient counterparts, but not as much as one might imagine as those earlier pans were either steel or thick aluminum. Heat spreading is still necessary for cooking with induction and coil heat sources, and in many cases, with gas flames.

kas


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

I had a flattop GE cooktop that got broke when we opened a cabinet above it and a cup fell out and landed on it. It was cheaper to replace it with a closeout Whirlpool Gold than to repair it. I worked in a lab with ceramic hot plates and we had warnings that they were known to explode violently if scratched or damaged by chemicals. That is because the material used then (Corning Ware Ceramics) had its heat tolerance caused when the stuff was tempered to produce a layer of shrunken glass on the surface. That is what prevented normal heat expansion and cold shrinking that causes glass to break.


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

I had a flattop GE cooktop that got broke when we opened a cabinet above it and a cup fell out and landed on it. It was cheaper to replace it with a closeout Whirlpool Gold than to repair it. I worked in a lab with ceramic hot plates and we had warnings that they were known to explode violently if scratched or damaged by chemicals. That is because the material used then (Corning Ware Ceramics) had its heat tolerance caused when the stuff was tempered to produce a layer of shrunken glass on the surface. That is what prevented normal heat expansion and cold shrinking that causes glass to break.


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

Schott, which is the creator of Ceran, has made over 110 million cooktops and has been making them for over 40 years. They place an emphasis on developing and refining their product so that it evolves as consumers needs evolve. As a result, they have this awesome cooktop many of you have mentioned. Want to mention, it is worth your time to visit their site to learn more about the science behind it and to see a few pictures.

Ceran is not fragile.

Here is a link that might be useful: Schott Glass Company


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

Schott, which is the creator of Ceran, has made over 110 million cooktops and has been making them for over 40 years. They place an emphasis on developing and refining their product so that it evolves as consumers needs evolve. As a result, they have this awesome cooktop many of you have mentioned. Want to mention, it is worth your time to visit their site to learn more about the science behind it and to see a few pictures.

Ceran is not fragile.

Here is a link that might be useful: Schott Glass Company


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RE: How Fragile is Ceran?

Leenora, am I correct in assuming you are in some way affiliated with Schott? If so, then perhaps you could explain all the chips I've gotten on a seldom used back burner on my range in just over three months. All the black dots you see in the picture are chips, not discoloration. They have appeared over this short time without explanation, not just one accident. I don't know who manufactured the Ceran for my old Frigidaire cooktop which had no such issues over a dozen years of use, but my Bosch, clearly labeled Schott, is definitely fragile in my book.

If you're a representative of Schott, I'd be most appreciative if you would click my user name and send an email acknowledging that this product must be defective because "Ceran is not fragile," so that I can use that as backup and request replacement glass under warranty.

Thank you!


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