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Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Posted by ChristyMcK (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 17, 14 at 20:57

joeboldt: re: 1/2 sheet pans in Cluny ovens, I not only have confirmation from you but also Victoria at Art Culinaire that indeed you can fit a 1/2 sheet pan in a cluny size oven....not sure where I went wrong - sorry!

Great advice on the pizza! We've also found an hour long oven preheat with a pizza stone does wonders for pizza. I am also a strong believer in using parchment paper to facilitate moving the pizza on and off the stone.

I'm still on the fence about whether to go electric or gas if I get the Volnay + combi steam oven. I'm leaning towards electric so I get the broiler and convection - opinions welcome. If I get the Cluny 1400 then of course I'll just get one of each w/o convection. I do believe French Blue will be our color of choice....at least for today.

Lacanche Ranges Part 43 (hopefully this will work): http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/appl/msg1014504328901.html?100


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

ChristyMcK- thanks for the input. Yes, the BS is very different from the others! Truth be told, I want a backup in case we decide to go with a less expensive option. I'm sure a Lacanche range falls into the category of "if you must ask the price you can't afford it" but since the range is our first major decision (aside from the actual plan of the house itself) I am somewhat hesitant to take that plunge with so many more decisions to be made!

I do plan to ask for ambassador referrals in the NC/SC area. Thanks again!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

TamaraTom: I guess one thing to consider in pricing them out is that they are not the same animal in terms of configurations since the 1400s have a warming cupboard and the BS does not, so that may affect the price comparison. A 48" BS and a Saulieu may be a better head to head comparison. If you are trying to save you could also go for cluny rather than the chagny since the cluny also has a broiler in the electric oven and it's about $1k cheaper. The Blue Star did make our short list too but once I saw them both in person I knew exactly the direction I wanted to go.

While the Lacanche ranges do cost more than the Blue Star, IMHO they are still within the cost range of most people who buy Blue Star - it just has to be worth it to the buyer to carve out the extra funds and worth what they might have to give up in a remodel. When a whole kitchen remodel is in the plans I can totally see how the equation can change. I generally like our kitchen (just not the cooking appliances) and so we opted for a light refresh so we could splurge on appliances.

I definitely asked about the pricing on my first call to Art Culinaire and they were very open about it all. My impression is there plenty of buyers who don't have to ask about price (lucky them!) and some who just want a kitchen trophy, but there is also a strong contingent of people who love to cook and for whom price was a major consideration. Good luck!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Christy, thanks again for taking the time to weigh in on this! Your points make a lot of sense. We will be seeing a BS in person this weekend and will set up visits with ambassadors. I really appreciate it!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

We have reached the maximum on thread part 43.

Joebolt, Thank you for your input on the French top and the 18k burner. It is great to have advice from someone like you who has owned and used your range for a few years now. I really appreciate that you take the time to come back and help those of us who still deciding to make a more informed decision.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Trinkette: How's the debate on the trade offs shaping up in your mind? It seems like you have an excellent grasp on the options and trade offs you need to make - you are just in that process of figuring out for yourself and family which options tugs most and seems the best.

TamaraTomNC: How's your investigating coming along?

I am now telling my husband when we'd use what burner and the warming cabinet (e.g. "I'll put those grilled onions in the warmining cupboard while you finish grilling the tenderloin...oh wait, that's not possible yet") even though our french blue Volnay is not here!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi Christy! thanks for checking in on us. We have made a decision- one that we feel good about but probably won't be popular on this forum :) We are going with the 48" BS platinum. We debated a number of factors (and yes, the Cluny and BS are such different ranges that I'm sure some are scratching their head wondering how we could even consider one vs the other) but in the end, my concern about the very long lead time and the shipping charge being double what I anticipated helped make the decision. Seeing the BS in action also helped a lot!

I love how you are pre-selling the warming drawer to your husband!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Tamara: Congratulations on making your decision. There are many people who love their BS ranges. I know some wonder how the two can be compared, but BS was on my short list too. They give you very different things and sometimes the contrast is helpful to defining what you really want. Good luck with your kitchen!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Joeboldt, thanks for your response regarding the French top (see last post, Lacanche Ranges Part 43). As always, the knowledge you've gained and shared is extremely helpful.

ChristyMcK, if I'd answered your question last week, I'd have said if Lacanche turns out to be the way to go, it'd be a Cluny, hands down. And I remained settled on the Cluny for several weeks. * I honestly think when you consider looks, performance, features, size and price, there is no better range in this class on the market. *

Then I began pining for my favorite Mauviel copper roasting pan and my beautiful Emile Henry roasting pan - neither fits inside a Cluny oven! Although I don't use either one terribly often, I do use them and I don't want to retire these pans. So, the Cluny is out and I'm back considering Volnay, Saulieu, and Chassagne with the larger gas oven, debating between advantages of a warming cabinet vs. the vertical electric convection cabinet as well as the pluses or minuses of a 40-inch-wide range vs. a 43.5-inch-wide range. Actually, just to really shake things up a bit, I'm even looking at the smaller Cormatin.

AND, I'm back to considering the option mentioned my original post on the other thread, which is to add a smaller electric wall oven, despite the fact that my kitchen wall and workspace is somewhat limited.

*SIGH* Around and around we go!

I'm fortunate to have the time to fiddle with all this. Part of the problem is my kitchen redesign is still wide open so I have the flexibility to do pretty much whatever I want - my only self-imposed caveat is that I don't want to overbuild for this particular house. Also, given the recent economy crash, I want to TRY to be more niggardly about non-essential expenses (yes, these beautiful, multi-thousand-dollar ranges ARE non-essential, lol) - of course, none of these lovely ranges are tight-fisted appliance choices.

TamaraTomNC, I think you made a great choice with the BS platinum. Congratulations. BS is one of my top-choice brands, and I might have very well gone with it if the Platinum came in a smaller size. I love the way it functions.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Trinkette: I feel like I went around and around too but after awhile it felt more like I just wanted try other options on before I dove in. So here are my random thoughts because it's fun to think about.

I don't think you get much for the extra price of the Chassagne over the Volnay. You do get to customize your cooktop but that's about it and it takes up more space which sounds like it's at a premium.

The Saulieu seems like your best option for a straight two oven range. We have a very similar set up now with our old electric range with one oven ~21 wide and the other ~14". The smaller oven size is a great size for a 2nd oven. I have never wanted more 2nd oven space. 43.5" isn't that much bigger than 40" and you could have both a french plate and 18k burner! Though it does give you a lot in a smallish range, it doesn't get you low temps that a warming cupboard or 2nd oven could do. I'd definitely cost this out. I think you pay for the extra burner you chose and in the end it may be more expensive than a Volnay/Cormatin+separate oven.

Of course the nice thing about a Cormatin+separate wall oven or Volnay + separate oven is that you can get a wall oven that goes low, to 80F (great for yogurt making, bread proofing, dish warming). The main trade off I see between these two options is that the Volnay gives you more range top space and an extra burner or two and of course then you'd also have a warming cupboard. The Cormatin is definitely a nice price.

With regard to the warming cupboard, its utility might depend on where you live. I'm confident we'll use our warming cupboard. Here in Seattle, our house is cool much of the year and so are our dinner plates! We also consecutively grill dishes on our charcoal Weber and I'm sure I'll use it to keep grilled veggies warm. I also love the idea of getting rid of my slow cooker and just using the warming cupboard for this purpose. We slow cook dried beans weekly. Now will I use two ovens and the warming cupboard all simultaneously? Honestly, probably not often, but I really wanted the 40" cooktop and the 18k burner and we don't have to modify our space since our current range is the same size as the Volnay.

Anyway, keep trying these combinations on! It sounds like you're totally on top of the pros and cons of the choices your considering (I'm probably not telling you anything you don't already know!). When you finally settle on one that fits well, you'll probably find yourself coming back to it despite other choices.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I have been reading through these threads and there is so much wonderful information! We are in the planning stages of a new build, so we have quite a bit of flexibility which is nice. If we go with a lacanche, it seems to have come down to the Cluny 1400 or the Sully (although the Citeaux is a not so distant 3rd option). Like most, I do worry a bit about the cluny ovens. I have measured much of my cookware, and while it all will fit, I worry that with such a tight fit you won't have even heating. I'm no expert in thermodynamics, but it does worry me. So I guess my question is for Cluny oven owners. With tight fitting cookware and full to capacity ovens, are you still getting evenly baked/roasted food?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi Laura: I think joeboldt may chime in here. He's had a cluny for 8/9 years and is very happy with it and the oven sizes. For what it's worth, the cluny ovens do fit a 1/2 size sheet pan. I think having an inch or two around the pan is ideal because it allows the heat to circulate but others may know more.

Like I mentioned above I have a small vertical oven now that's 14" wide in my current 1956 range that we are replacing. I think in the Citeaux the second oven is a bit narrower, but I really like the 14" size for a second oven. Had we had a bigger kitchen or been renovating the entire space I would have gone with the Citeaux. What we did opt for (Volnay+separate 24" combi steam oven) is perfect for our current space. We still get two ovens and a warming cupboard but I get to keep my highly valued counter space.

Good luck with sorting it all out!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

The Volnay and separate oven is a great idea as well. What did you choose for the stove top?

It is reassuring to know people are happy with the small ovens, the cluny 1400 offers so much for the price too! I think we will probably go with it (if we choose Lacanche). We have a large kitchen, so another separate oven in the island is always an option as well.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

LauraFaye: We picked the Classique with the open 18k burner. We water bath can and wanted a very powerful burner. The other burners are two 11k burners, a 15k burner and a 5k burner. Had I gone with a Citeaux we would have added the french plate to this configuration.

For the second oven, some people go with a 30" to ensure they have what they are used to in terms of oven space. Given we like our current set up with two smaller ovens, I didn't think that would be needed for us.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Is anyone able to share experiences with the vertical electric convection oven? I've read through the threads and can't find comments regarding vertical oven performance/convenience. Perhaps, there just aren't many out there ...?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

It is done! I have placed my order for a delft blue Cluny with french plate. In the end I decided that the disadvantages of a very low to the ground main oven outweighed the benefits of having a third mini-oven, so the Chagny was out. I am indebted to all the thoughts and advice on this forum, as well as the patient and helpful folks at Art Culinaire. Now I just have to wait!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Very exciting achauer!! I love the delft blue, what trim did you choose?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

achauer: Congratulations! The Cluny is a great choice and the delft blue is beau-ti-ful.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

LauraFaye, I chose the brass trim. I'm also getting a pair of the brass towel bar end caps in order to make a matching utensil/pot bar on the backsplash. Did you know that you can even order the storage drawer pulls and oven knobs?


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YAY! Congratulations achauer. Love the Cluny, especially in such a yummy color. And good to know about the end caps, pulls and knobs. Don't forget to share photos after it is installed. : D


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Can anyone enlighten me on the speed of boiling a large pot of water on one of their 15K burners? Aside from perhaps doing a water bath for canning, is the 18K single burner really more useful than a french top?

ChristyMcK: the more I have thought about your setup, the more I think it may meet our needs! I really would love to have a steam/convection oven. I think we would use it almost exclusively to be honest, but with the smaller lacanche that forces me to choose between the french top and 18K burner… sigh


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Laura: I went through this decision making process too. In the end I realized that over the years I had often thought about wanting high heat burners while I cooked, but never thought about wanting the french top features. I considered the blue star because of the high heat 22k open burners but the craftsmanship and beauty of the Lacanche sold me and I felt one 18k burner would be enough high heat for me, especially after I saw the Lacanche burners in action and can be a little klutzy and forgetful in the kitchen. :)

In addition to canning, I expect the extra 3k will be handy when wok cooking, boiling water for pasta, and high heat searing. I think the extent to which the 18k does these tasks better than a 15k is elusive information. I also think which configuration is best is really personal and depends on how you cook and your own range preferences. Since ranges with the classique configuration come with a cast iron plate that covers two burners that can serve as a mock french plate I thought this would be the best of both worlds for us. DH wanted whatever I wanted on this one.

I think Victoria has stats on how fast water can boil. The 15k burner on the Cluny I tested boiled water in about the same amount of time as my largest most powerful electric coil. The Cluny had a french top so I couldn't test the 18k. Also, I didn't accurately measure the water or the temperature, so this was not a precise comparison. I did use the same 8qt Cuisinart stockpot about 2/3 full for both.

And I would say that if I am only using one thing on my '56 electric range (big coil burner only with no oven on), it gets really, really hot and can do the job more quickly than any gas or other electric oven I've ever used. But....my range can only do one thing at a time though right now....It is rather senior at 58 years old so I can't really blame it! A good reason to upgrade....:)


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Christy: It definitely sounds like a good reason to upgrade! I didn't realize there was a simmer plate accessory till earlier today, that is a game changer for me and definitely makes me lean toward the classic top. I have two littles, so the long cool down time was definitely a downside of the french plate :) We also can throughout the year, so I definitely like the idea of the 18K burner for that. Thank you for all the great info!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hmmm I really wish someone would put together a comprehensive blog post on the different oven sizes with lots of pictures! I think it would be extremely helpful. Some visual help in understanding what fits in what. Thankfully I will soon have a showroom right here in town, but I can imagine it would be really great for those who can't see them irl. Perhaps I should chat with Patrick from Lacanche Canada about doing this!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi Laura,

What you mention does sound like a nice idea. As a short term solution you might consider using cardboard to cutout and make the oven size. Even simply making the bottom space in a cutout cardboard would allow you to get a feel for what cookware you could and couldn't put in the different size ovens. If you do this, one thing I'd ask about is if the wire rack holder protrude into the space so you know how much actual space you have to work with.

From a height perspective, I can only think that a really big turkey might matter. Chickens, roasts, angel food cakes, etc. should have no problem fitting in height wise regardless of what which oven height you choose. One reason I chose the bigger 21" oven is that I although I thought everything would fit in the cluny sized ovens, I thought the bigger size would be easier to place and remove food from. For example, I slide pizza on parchment onto a pizza stone and find my current 21" oven an ideal space for doing this.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Christy,

yes I have thought of doing that as well, although I am in no big rush so I can wait for the showroom and bring in my cookware and try it out! I am simply a visual person, so seeing different sized pans in the ovens would be really helpful for me in the decision making process. Also, considering oven size is a recurring question for potential Lacanche owners, I think a post by Art Culinaire or French Barn (Lacanche Canada) would be in their interest to do.

I think I am similar to you. I don't really have anything that won't fit in the cluny ovens, its more the function of getting things in and out. The small vertical oven in the citeaux though is a different story. I love the look of the citeaux, but I am having a hard time imagining what will fit in that small oven! I wish more citeaux owners would come back and comment on it.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

LauraFaye, I too was hoping or feedback about the vertical oven. However, it seems that either the vertical ovens are scarce or their owners are shy!

At this point, with patient advice from Victoria Lane regarding my needs, I think that I'm going with a warming cabinet instead of the vertical convection oven. ChristyMcK, my pick for a Lacanche range is shaping-up quite similar to your choice!

On a different note, can anyone comment on pros and cons regarding Lacanche's island spacer vs. their complimentary wall-mounted back spacer? I'd love to hear thoughts from Lacanche owners. Also, please, if you recently ordered a range, which spacer did you choose? Although my range will be against a wall, I'm thinking the flat island spacer might suit my needs best - but that's just a guess based on looks and what I'm sensing is the greater simplicity of the island spacer.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

We have the island spacer, although I can't recall why we made that choice. Does push you out a bit farther, if that's an issue.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks joeboldt. It does appear like the island spacer puts the range farther out, however, I think that I remember reading on the Lacanche website that the two spacers put the range about the same distance from the wall - you wouldn't think so just looking at the photos. I'll have to double-check.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

We are going to fireproof our back wall with tile. The Lancanche would otherwise stand out much, much further than our current range and it is located on a corner where I envisioned hitting my thigh into the side of the range when walking around the bend. Fortunately this does not affect the warranty.

Trinkette: Sounds like you are making progress to settling into the right fit. Whoo hooo!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Does anyone know the answer to this question?
If one upgrades to a color, is the price of the upgrade the same whether it's a Cormatin or a Sully, etc., or is the color upgrade more on a larger model?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

As far as I know, price for color upgrade varies depending on size. Recently I compared rough quotes for 39+" and 55+" Lacanche ranges and there was a $400 difference in the color upgrade charge.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

The Cormatin color upgrade that I think I like is $1300.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Definitely request the full brochure - it lists every model and every upgrade and add-on cost, plus a color swatch fan deck (better than website colors, but not as good as the enamel color chips).

The color upgrade on the Cormatin is $650, whereas on the Sully it is $1300. Trim charges and freight charges are also scaled to the size of the range.

Trinkette: I went with the island spacer.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Right, but, unfortunately, the two colors that may work were not in the packet, and are an additional upgrade above the basic color upgrade. So, I am awaiting swatches . . .


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I understand that if you'd like a color upgrade that is not one of Lacanche's offered colors, the price for the upgrade is doubled.

Thanks achauer for weighing in on the spacer!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Per achuer "Definitely request the full brochure - it lists every model and every upgrade and add-on cost, plus a color swatch fan deck (better than website colors, but not as good as the enamel color chips)."

For anyone looking at Lacanche ranges, I also wholeheartedly agree with this recommendation. The brochure was very helpful with pricing, and the enamel color chips are super helpful in really seeing what colors truly look like.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hello all, your comments have been so helpful and I'm wondering if someone can help me with my Lacanche decision. I am now between the Cluny and a Chagny -I like the idea of the little broiler but that puts the electric oven lower to the ground. Is that painful on the back? I'm thinking as I age :) I do more baking than roasting but DH wants a gas oven included. Also it says the ovens are 18" deep which is the exact measurement of my favorite WS baking sheets. Will that be a problem? I really want two ovens so I'm willing to cope with the smaller ovens. And If I choose stainless it will be very close to my stainless refrigerator (maybe a narrow cabinet ) in between. Would that look odd? All cabs are white wood with butcher block top island in center of room. Any comments, suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I was agonizing over the exact same decision, Laurel7. I even arranged to visit a Chagny model to test the ergonomics in person. The electric oven is indeed just off the floor. Although I really loved the idea of having a third, petite oven for all kinds of things, I finally decided that the difficulty of dealing with getting baked goods into and out of one of the two main ovens would, for me, outweigh the bonus options I would gain from the petite broiler. Having two ovens to work with was the top item in my new range wish list, and so compromising the usefulness of one of those ovens seemed less than ideal.

So, that was my thought process - I hope it helps!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Honestly, if you can happily manage the smaller ovens, I think the Cluny with one electric and one gas oven is just about the best deal going these days in terms of what you get for the money (my opinion only, of course). Another option in the same size range size is a Volnay with vertical electric oven; however, if baking is your primary use for an oven, then, the smaller/narrower dimensions may not function as well for you.

Since I've never tried it I'm afraid I can't comment on your baking sheet question.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thank you achauer, that really did help in my decision making regarding the "lowness" of the baking oven. And trinkette I appreciate your comments too-I think the vertical oven will be just too small. Oh to have the space for everything I want! I think the Cluny for the space requirement not to mention budget will work well. Sometimes I wish I'd not seen the Lacanche because aesthetically I don't think I can be happy with any other range! And to hear most people rave about the quality, performance and service is most reassuring. Hoping to see one in person very soon...


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Okay, so this is not exactly a Lancanche post but I am thrilled (and apparently need to share) that I have finished rounding out our appliances with a Gaggenau combi-steam oven. I got a new 200 series 24" model at a great discount with a full 5-year warranty. Like the Lacanche, I loved the simplicity of the design and it's reported high quality. It does not have a broiler so I'm glad I'll have one in the Lacanche! Now back to Lacanche talk....


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Congratulations Christy-so exciting to find a great deal on a great product!

I have a question re the grill options for the Lacanche ranges and I hope someone can enlighten me! How are the flame grill or the grill plate options to use and clean? I'm wondering if I can find the room for a larger range is the flame grill option something I will wonder how I lived without it? And regard the Lacanche grill plate that sits over two burners-is it vastly superior to the electric ones such as panini makers or the cast iron grill such as the flip side of my pancake griddle? Thank you!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

We have the grill and griddle that go across the two burners. We live in San Diego and do all our grilling outdoors, so the grill is still in the box. (anyone wants it? Pay the shipping and I'll send it. It's heavy!)

We used the griddle just a few times. It also is very heavy and it took a while to get the heat right. It's cast iron, so it is also a PITA to clean. We went with a lighter version.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Joe -thank you so much for your response. We live in SoCal also but I was thinking the indoor grill would be convenient but it doesn't sound like it! I also have other grilling options that are also a PITA to clean so why add another:)
And I would have to do a major remodel rather than the minor for the Cluny. Just hope I don't miss the warming drawer as I have one in my funky, dying, frigidaire. It comes in handy-mostly at pancake time.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

The nice thing about the size of the cluny oven is that you don't need to feel guilty about turning your oven to 250 to use as a pancake (or in our case, onion ring, french fry, etc) warming oven.

The other thing to consider with indoor grilling is the increased ventilation requirements.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks, Joe, that's good to know. Also, the increased ventilation issue is something I'd rather not deal with. I'm getting closer to ordering my range. Now I just need to see the ovens in person and settle on a color.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Does anyone have just the basic Cormatin? I can't get these ranges of of my head, and that's the one we can realistically afford and fit in our space.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

alerievay: They are beautiful ranges aren't they?! While there are undoubtedly Cormatin owners out there I haven't seen any mention this while posting as of late. There are many of us that have ordered or who own parts of the Cormatin (the oven size, the types of burners, etc.) that make up the Cormatin so if you think of it in those terms then much of the information here will be applicable.

I think I'd ask yourself if you would you be happy with a 21" oven. I currently have this size and love it and don't feel limited it by it at all, but others feel like they need something bigger offered on most other 30" ranges. Is there a burner configuration with the BTUs to your satisfaction? Again some want the 22k burners offered by blue star while others think the 15k on the Lacanche serves all their needs very well. If you really want the 18k burner, will you be satisfied with 3 burners (you could always buy a plug-in induction burner if you went this route if you really wanted 4 burners)?

The costs of color, shipping and tax should be part of the equation and so you might want to talk with someone at Art Culinaire to get an accurate price. Thinking about these types of choices, the cost, and the overall range appeal, does this still seem right? If so, I wouldn't let the fact that noone on GW has a Cormatin stop you. There's nothing inherently different about this range, it's just that after figuring out the options we each end up with something a little different that best suits our needs. The ability to customize is a great feature of the Lacanche!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Years ago, there was a poster here who had an orange Cormatin (terra cotta, I think, but maybe mandarin?) and his kitchen was small but highly functional. I do not recall his exact configuration, but he managed to turn out elaborate meals, and he raved about his range's capabilities. Later, he either let or sold his place, and the Cormatin along with it. In his similar, new, small kitchen, he cooked on a Bluestar. His conclusion was the Bluestar was even more fun to use than was the Cormatin, although I do not recall why. My own comparisons of small ranges lead me to believe that the oven size and burners available, plus the easier shipping, make the Bluestar the far more practical choice. However, the charm of the Cormatin is hard to beat. As discussed above, non-standard offered colors are an additional $650 on the Cormatin, and colors like Aubergine and Coral Blue an additional $1300. You have said that you are interested in the standard black, so that is a bit of a break, price wise. Add in any extras, shipping, and tax, and you have a very expensive, very small, very charming range. If you do a google search of this forum+Cormatin, you may find some of the old threads about the Cormatin.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks. I am still tempted by this range, but I do think it's probably impractical.

Coincidentally, I bought an induction burner last weekend. I do think I could live with the Classique setup, especially with the extra induction burner. I also have a rice cooker and electric pressure cooker that see a lot of regular use, so I very rarely use more than 3 burners. But I am doubting it's worth the extra $3000, theoretically, over better-performing models.

If only I could get it out of my head!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I actually don't think it's impractical at all. I think these are designed to be very practical, functional ranges that come in a relatively compact size. (BTW, this is meant in a friendly non-confrontational tone...just thought I'd say since text has no tone.)

In terms of performance, I think both BS and Lancanche are both excellent performing ranges. The relative advantage IMHO of the Lancanche is in the gorgeous design, higher quality craftsmanship, beauty, and customization (gas top + electric oven? 3 or 4 burners?). One big advantage for me was that I wanted a 36-39" cooktop but a smaller oven rather than a 36" oven, which is way too big for us and took too long to heat up for our liking.

Anyway, if you are still stuck on it, go take a look at both in person - it's the best way to know which way to go. You many not see a Cormatin but you would see similar range size/burners, craftsmanship, etc. and figure out if the extra $ is worth it to you. Good luck!

This post was edited by ChristyMcK on Tue, May 20, 14 at 23:56


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks, ChristyMcK!

I got a quote today, and I contacted the ambassadors program representative to try to see one in person. I suspect the final price might not be considerably more than buying one of the other ranges we're exploring, so we'll see.

I have loved cooking on my induction burner so far, though!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I think Cromatin is a great range both in terms of form and function. I've seriously considered it myself, and I can easily fit a larger range into our kitchen space. There's something very appealing about simple efficiency and paring down to the essentials ... and it doesn't hurt when the quality build and eye-appeal is in there as well!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Trinkette, Just wondering how the search is going? Sitting on the winning ticket yet?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Eek! The Lacanche showroom here in Calgary is opening this weekend! Excited to bring some cookware and try out all the ovens :)


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Well, we stopped into the Lacanche Canada (French Barn) showroom that opened yesterday. Patrick and Flo are sweet and knowledgeable and so welcoming. The showroom itself is in a lovely old brick building which suits the ranges so well!!

The showroom has a Sully 2200 (wow!!!), a cluny, and chagny, and after the summer will have a beautiful Citeaux in delft blue that is currently on display at another store here in Calgary.

After seeing the cluny ovens, we ruled them out for us. While I am sure many people wouldn't be bothered by their size, I know over the long term I would have wished to have a wider oven to put my roasters in, versus having to pull them out catch the bottom, etc.

That left the Citeaux and Sully in the running. Look wise for me, the citeaux wins hands down. Not that the Sully isn't beautiful, but the Citeaux's symmetry is simply stunning and an absolute showstopper.

The two large ovens in the Sully are definitely a huge selling point, that said for the options we are looking at it is about 1K more than the Citeaux and it doesn't have a warming cabinet. So that left me with the big question of whether the Citeaux's vertical oven is actually useable. The answer for me, yes!!! Casserole dishes fit, a couple 1/4 sheet cookie sheets, pie plates, and even small roasters (length less than 16" with handles and 12" width). Do my big roasters fit, no, but really I would normally be doing my meats in the large gas oven, and similarly if I was roasting a large number of veggies. I have 2 boys and a baby on the way, so cookies might take baking two batches if I really want to do them in the convection, that said for bake sales etc. a gas oven will still bake cookies :) and on top of it all? You get the warming cabinet, which in our household will be used a lot!!

So now we have finally picked our Lacanche, now we just have to decide if we will take the plunge (it is about 5K more than our non Lacanche option), and decide on finish and colour. Our cooktop if we do take the plunge will be the classique, with an electric plancha, and 2 additional 11K burners (although I am wavering between the 11k vs 15k, I'd love to have some input from current owners).


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

The Citeaux is an absolutely gorgeous range and a great design. I haven't yet received my Volnay yet (August ETA) but I recall during my review of the threads that many people recommended the lower BTU burners, I think because the burners are really powerful and the 11k given better overall range of typical everyday use.

Good luck with your decision. If it's within budget I'd definitely do it, but of course we already did so easy for me to say!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Christy: August is getting close! Can't wait to see your baby :) I think we will do the 11K. I went back through the threads last night and your right, people seemed to agree the lower BTUs is a good option.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

ChristyMcK, I'm still out here and my decision has been made. It WILL be a Lacanche. However, we're still undecided about some other kitchen issues, so we're waiting a bit before we order the range - just to be sure the Lacanche color we'd like will work with everything else. Shouldn't be long now ...


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hello, I have a question about drip pans. I have a Volnay. Are the drip pans for the warming oven and the main oven supposed to be the same size? Mine are, which seems weird. They both fit the warming oven perfectly, but when in the mainoven (turned 90 degrees) it doesnt cover the entire rack front to back. Just wondering if maybe I got one pan that was the wrong size by accident or if its supposed to be this way.

Thanks!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

trinkette: congratulations on your decision! you must be thrilled. hope the rest of your decision making process comes together nicely.

OOTM_mom: you posted a really nice message excited for us and our Volnay with an ETA in August and I could never figure out how to reply to it! Anyway, thank you! We chose French Blue (a navy like color) with the classique cooktop and electric oven. Our other oven will be a Gaggenau steam oven that doesn't have a broiler so I'm glad I decided on the electric oven which has a broiler.

Regarding the drip tray, you might contact Victoria or someone at french ranges. The accessory link on their website says you'd get a drip tray corresponding to the oven (Cluny or Sully) so I think you may have received the wrong size. See here:
http://www.frenchranges.com/product/drip-tray/


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Just curious....when it comes time to replace your Lacanche Range are you concerned about limited options due to the unique widths?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Well, our Lacanche is replacing the exact same size range we currently have, which is from 1956 (A GE electric Stratliner) so we don't have to change anything now. Also, my hope is that we will get a LOT of years out of this range (e.g. 20 years) and by then who knows.....So, it's not really a concern for us.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I've been an avid reader of the Lacanche threads, and I'm just about ready to take the plunge and order mine. We've settled on the Cluny in French Blue with brass trim, and I'm 95% sure we want the French plate instead of the 18k burner.

For current owners, I'm curious how you use the 18k burner and/or the FP. We don't can vegetables or use a wok, and I can't remember ever thinking that our electric cook top isn't boiling water fast enough. I put a full pot of water on this morning to see how long it took to get to a full boil and it was 13 minutes. I'm guessing that the 15k burner will be at least as fast. The 18k burner looks so big I'm not sure what we would do with it other than boil big pots of water. How do other people use it?

If you have the FP, how do you use it?

Kathleen


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I have a Volnay with french plate, it is mostly an extra work surface to stage things or place hot stuff. I really like it for that purpose. I have cooked on it a few times, but usually all the other burners suffice. I only really need it for those big family dinners. I find the 15k is plenty big enough (so are the 11k if you ask me) I rarely have either the 15 or 11 much over low, unless boiling water or frying catfish. Just a hair above low on the 11k is where I fry bacon, if that gives you a frame of reference.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Our current 39" range (same size as the Volnay/Cluny) has an area that used to be used for a plug-in griddle that came with the range but the heat proof enamel top without the griddle on it is perfect for a landing strip. We use it as a landing strip all the time. Other than the occasional wok cooking and canning I'll do on the 18k, I'm not sure how much I'll use it. I am thinking about getting a cover that is available for the 18k so it too can be used as a landing strip. In my test run of the Lacanche I was surprised at how H-O-T those burners were. It sounds like for your needs a 15k burner + FP would serve you well.

We also ordered a French blue color with brass trim - great pick! :)


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks for the feedback ChristyMcK and OOTM_Mom. If you fry bacon on the 11k burner a hair above low, then I don't need the 18k burner. I like the idea of having a landing spot between the two sets of burners, and my husband will like experimenting with the FP. For me cooking is a necessary chore but he really enjoys it. I confess that I pushed for the Lacanche because I fell in love with it from pictures. I was able to talk my husband into getting one by touting all it's great features - of course he saw right through me!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Could someone please show me or direct me to a photo of a Lacanche taken from the side? Preferably a Cormatin or Cluny, but any would do. I am afraid some of the inner workings may show if the stove were to be used as a freestanding piece. Is that true?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Here is a picture of the side of mine while still in the crate (Volnay) the sides are definitely finished. Sides look great.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

And one more unwrapped and being moved onto place. Cant see the whole side, but at least it is unwrapped.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thank you so much! I had read about a larger model with sides partially unfinished. This one is under consideration for a small summer kitchen, but the sides would not be hidden by adjacent cabinets, especially from certain vantage points.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Can any of you comment on the actual cooking performance of your Lacanche? I am torn between the beauty of the Lacanche and the seeming high performance of the Bluestar. I know, I know they are night and day design-wise. Lacanche buyers say "I love the look!" and Bluestar buyers say "It changed the way I cook!" No one ever talks about Lacanche performance. Does it cook at the 10-20k level? Or is it really about looks and solid construction?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I also was torn between these two things when making our decision. I never loved the look of the BS and do love to cook and so I was worried I'd be giving up performance for beauty. Many Lacanche owners are also avid cooks and from what I can tell have been very happy with the performance of the Lacanche. I tested the Lacanche and was very surprised by it's power - even the lower BTU burners seemed a lot more powerful than comparable burners I have cooked on (which is a lot since we moved 8 times over the last 13 years). It convinced me that not having the 22k or 25k BTU would not be a sacrifice.

I think what you get for the higher price tag is not only a great performer but also a beautiful and solid range. Do any of us need a Lacanche? IMHO, no. We don't need a BS either. Both are great cookers so the difference in price IMO relative to a lot of other high end ranges is configuration (we wanted a 36-40" cooktop with small ovens) and the beauty and construction. Whether that is worth the price is a totally subjective thing. I did not want a 36" oven. They take too long to heat and they are way too big for our purposes and I also did not want a 30" cooktop so this was also a key factor in our decision.

But take what I saw with a grain of salt as we haven't been using one regularly since it's still on it's way!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

mbwestfall: The best advice I can give you is to do a search on Lacanche. There are numerous threads and opinions. To sum up my experiences, and we cook a lot, it's great.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi all,

Sorry that I haven't been around. For the new members, I am a chef in NYC and I designed my kitchen in my vacation home around my range, a Vougeot in marron glace with the 18k burner, electric convection oven and warming cabinet.

I love the versatility of my setup.

I have a lot of experience with French tops and I opted out of that option. I have a Lacanche griddle that I use very often. It is heavy cast iron and it may be too much for some but I use it very often. First it doubles as my French top when I need one (not often). When I do, because it is NOT over a monster 18k burner, it works very well as one. My kitchen is very well ventilated so I use it when sautéing large quantities of something or things that have a large surface area like eggplant disks that I top with a ragu. Most of the time, like a cast-iron pan, it just needs a wiping up. Washing it takes the non-stick seasoned quality of the metal away. If I grill shrimp on it then...yes. Off to the sink it goes. For the way that I cook, it is a very valuable addition to the versatility of my set-up. I get to take full use of the 18k this way and when I stir fry or boil a large pot of water for lasagna, it boils fast!

The warming oven is also invaluable to me. After a few hours of smoke outdoors, I can finish my BBQ pork shoulder or briskets in there. Low and slow. They always come out perfectly. Stews and braised meat also. I proof my yeast risen breads, croissants etc. It keeps a good steady low heat for plates, holding side dishes etc. Fitting things inside has not been a problem for me.

I chose the electric convection oven so that if I do a run of cookies, mini red velvet cupcakes or croissants, I could.

If I roast a rib eye or turkey, I put a pan of water on the oven floor for moisture and when brown, I tent it from the wind. For pizza, I use the stone higher up in the oven and heat it with the broiler. Pizza in Naples is cooked at 700-800 degrees with a lot of heat from the wood flames cooking it from the top as well as the bottom and is done in 90 seconds. This comes close.

My only complaint about the performance of My Lacanche is that even on the smallest burner. A low simmer is not possible without one of those things (what is their name?) that reduces and spreads the heat. Not a very serious complaint and easily fixe. No light in the oven has been discussed here also as a needed change to the design.

I did not have the room on the wall or in my budget for a double oven Lacanche. The Cluny would not have been a good choice for me because I work a lot with half sheet pans and even though they fit, I was afraid of poor air circulation. Also with the Cluny oven's, they are deeper than they are wide and I was not comfortable with that. I like to open the door and see left to right what's happening.

So to complete my battery of cooking equipment, I have a second under cabinet 9 function electric oven with a rotisserie. I can cook there without wind and roast excellent chickens and boneless roasts on the spit with those wonderful juices dripping onto the potatoes below.

I am deliriously happy with how this worked out for me. The Lacanche is the biggest reason why. I wouldn't change a thing about it.

I hope that my experiences help the decision making out there.

Here is a picture of gamberoni on the plancha (griddle)


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

chef-marty! I read many of your past posts and they were very helpful to us in making our decision. Thank you for all your input! Glad to hear you are still a very happy customer. Our Volnay in french blue has an ETA for August and we are so excited!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi,

I don't usually look on this forum but now it started popping up under "recent posts". We have the Citeaux.

In response to a few posts above:

1. In re the vertical oven. This is the oven we use most. (family of five, cooking help on weeknights). I have heard people say that smaller ovens cook better, and they may be right. I wanted the center over just in case, but frankly we use it mainly for batches of cookies and a large bird. Everything else is in the vertical one. It is easier to use, too.
2. In re the the plate or hob. I used it to cook on only once or twice. It is very rare for me to need that extra heat source, so I have never learned how to use it much. It is a great landing area, but it can get dirty around the ring so that makes it suboptimal as just a landing area.
3. In re the side view. IMHO they are not finished with the idea that the sides will be open, only because I am not thrilled with the look of the gap between the wall and oven.

If you are on GW you've probably already seen my photos, if not I can post more. I don't personally believe that a LaCanche provides most chefs with superior function, burner for burner if you will, but i like all the layout options and it sure looks good doing it.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Chef Marty, Thank you for posting this information about the French Top! I will be ordering my Lacanche in Sept and I have started going back and forth about adding one again. Although, I do like the look of it, your post reminded me of the reasons I decided I don't need it. I rarely ever melt chocolate or other things, so the main reason I would use it would be to keep food hot. I can easily accomplish this task with the warming oven. My main reason for getting a Lacanche, Cluny 1400, is to gain more burners. I frequently cook various tapas dishes for 6 or more people and trying to do this on only 4 burners is challenging! I will stick with the original plan to add either two extra 11,000 or 15,000 burners.

Now the decision is which ones would be more useful! Any suggestions that you have would be most helpful.

Thank you also for all your posts over the years, they have been so helpful!

PS - Your gamberoni look delicious! I miss the large, fresh pawns in Europe.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Chef Marty, I am curious about your other electric oven. Brand? Available in U.S.?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

So I am debating Sully vs. Citeaux:

What does one actually do with a warming cupboard? Is it mainly for entertaining? Having lived 44 years without even touching one, it seems irrational to be torn between having one and not but I keep thinking "What if I just don't know what I am missing?"

Are the vertical ovens actually useful? Do people like them? Using a small oven for small tasks seems logical but I have never had one.

DH prefers a Sully so we can have a gas oven. His logic is "Gas is what the pros use so it must be better." However, DH has never even turned our ovens on so suddenly developing a strong preference in ovens is a baffling mystery to me.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi ChristyMck,
Congratulations! I know the feeling. The house took about a year longer to finish than I was told. No surprise. The range was in storage so we drove and 1 hour and 50 minutes one-way just to go and visit my range at the distributor’s warehouse in Trani. They opened the box and let me drool a little, then put the lid back on. I did not see it for another year.

Hi mtnrdredux,
From a visual and versatility standpoint, I think that the Citeaux is my favorite model. I am glad that the vertical oven is a plus for you.
I agree about the French top. It is a waste of space to use it only as a landing spot! If your range is a 1400 or more, there are many options like a fryer or built-in plancha that you could have instead and really have a workhorse. No, maybe the multi-cooker or the induction rings. I would have to think about that.
I also agree that Lacanche offers superior function. The versatility of my set-up was not really an option with other brands that I know of. What other company has options and features like our ranges? Blue Star looks really heavy duty but we are cooking at home.

Hi cori4137,
One thing you said worries me on behalf of people who never used a French top. “Although, I do like the look of it.” Please everyone, do not buy a French to because it looks cool. It has to match your personal style of cooking and if you have never used one before, it is probably not for you. I believe that Joe said that his gets too hot to work well anyhow.
For the way that I cook, I would take the 11k burners. Unless you often need to boil two large pots of water fast. The 11k burners would be better tuned for me to finish my things off. I do not know what tapas you are cooking but the 15k’s are big flames and harder to simmer on. Do you need big flames? Those prawns were in the water twelve hours earlier! When I bought them at 11AM, they had never seen the inside of a refrigerator! Puglia has 500 mile of coastline on two seas and the seafood is Lacanche worthy.

Hi kitchendetective,
My oven is not an expensive model. Ariston makes it. U.S. availability is unknown but if not available under the Ariston name, I bet the same or nearly the same oven is available with a U.S. partner. Everything is global now.

Hi mbwebstall,
Read my post from yesterday. This is what I do in there. Are you that type of cook? Do you cook low and slow? Do you bake on cold damp days in winter and need a proofing cabinet? Do you have parties that require the dishes to be warmed? Do you need a place to keep side dishes warm while finishing the entrée?

It is a pleasure to talk to you all about cooking on our Lacanches!

Marty


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Chef Marty,

Thank you for your words of advice. My comment about the French Plate was my attempt at being honest with myself. But, I can see why it would worry you! I used a traditional Aga for a few years in England. Due to the nature of it always being on, it provided a surface area on the range top which was always very warm. I could melt chocolate, butter, or make a nice hollandaise sauce on it. Now, I don't know for sure, since I'm certainly no chef, but the Aga tech who serviced the first unit I used and explained it's uses to me to told me the top was similar to using a French Plate. It is based on that experience, your comments and knowing I can make a hollandaise sauce or melt chocolate in other ways when needed, that I decided against one despite how cool they look!

Your suggestions on the 11,000 BTU burners are very helpful. I thought two of the lower BTU's would be more useful, but my husband was of the opinion, "The hotter the better!". Since I don't personally know the BTU's of my current electric stove and I didn't know them on the Aga; they were hot and hotter, I felt like I might be making a mistake to not go with the higher BTU's. Just so you know, I didn't buy the Agas, they came in houses we rented, that is why I knew nothing about them. When I first started using the Aga, I thought it was the most antiquated thing I had ever seen. I also couldn't imagine it could ever rival my modern, American stove. Boy, was I wrong! Once, I figured out how to use it, I learned it cooked like a dream. I really began to appreciate boiling water in just minutes, the small ovens that produced the best roast chickens I had ever eaten and the warming oven; which I used mostly for slow cooking. The Aga was the reason I started looking into Lacanche and other European ranges/cookers. Anyway, I have digressed. I read your message to my husband and he agreed with your suggestions about the lower BTU burners. Thank you for helping us settling it!

As for tapas, we cook dishes such as croquettes, pan fried calamari, gambas al ajillo, patatas bravas and tortilla Espanola. So many are sauteed as the first step and you are absolutely correct, a lower BTU would allow for better control of these dishes.

I haven't personally visited Puglia, my husband has and said it was a beautiful area. I pulled up your villa from a link you posted several years ago. Your villa is lovely. When we get back to Italy, we will certainly consider contacting you about it! We really like to stay on the coast and in an area that really allows us to get to experience a bit of local life; especially the local markets for the fresh seafood and produce. Your restaurant in NY is also very intriguing!

Thank you again!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi ChristyMck,
Congratulations! I know the feeling. The house took about a year longer to finish than I was told. No surprise. The range was in storage so we drove and 1 hour and 50 minutes one-way just to go and visit my range at the distributor’s warehouse in Trani. They opened the box and let me drool a little, then put the lid back on. I did not see it for another year.

Hi mtnrdredux,
From a visual and versatility standpoint, I think that the Citeaux is my favorite model. I am glad that the vertical oven is a plus for you.
I agree about the French top. It is a waste of space to use it only as a landing spot! If your range is a 1400 or more, there are many options like a fryer or built-in plancha that you could have instead and really have a workhorse. No, maybe the multi-cooker or the induction rings. I would have to think about that.
I also agree that Lacanche offers superior function. The versatility of my set-up was not really an option with other brands that I know of. What other company has options and features like our ranges? Blue Star looks really heavy duty but we are cooking at home.

Hi cori4137,
One thing you said worries me on behalf of people who never used a French top. “Although, I do like the look of it.” Please everyone, do not buy a French to because it looks cool. It has to match your personal style of cooking and if you have never used one before, it is probably not for you. I believe that Joe said that his gets too hot to work well anyhow.
For the way that I cook, I would take the 11k burners. Unless you often need to boil two large pots of water fast. The 11k burners would be better tuned for me to finish my things off. I do not know what tapas you are cooking but the 15k’s are big flames and harder to simmer on. Do you need big flames? Those prawns were in the water twelve hours earlier! When I bought them at 11AM, they had never seen the inside of a refrigerator! Puglia has 500 mile of coastline on two seas and the seafood is Lacanche worthy.

Hi kitchendetective,
My oven is not an expensive model. Ariston makes it. U.S. availability is unknown but if not available under the Ariston name, I bet the same or nearly the same oven is available with a U.S. partner. Everything is global now.

Hi mbwebstall,
Read my post from yesterday. This is what I do in there. Are you that type of cook? Do you cook low and slow? Do you bake on cold damp days in winter and need a proofing cabinet? Do you have parties that require the dishes to be warmed? Do you need a place to keep side dishes warm while finishing the entrée?

It is a pleasure to talk to you all about cooking on our Lacanches!

Marty


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Sorry for accidentally posting that twice OOOPS!

I've heard wonderful things about the Aga. In the summer, when not in a northern climate, being on all the time can't be a fun thing. I would love to try one.

When I worked in a Spanish restaurant we used little clay dishes that we heated over a burner with plenty of olive oil, added sliced garlic, browned it, sometimes add a dry hot chili and then added the gambas, angulas, chorizo or calamari. The food would cook fast in the oil and we would send it out still sizzling. The torta Espanola was studied by the Spanish owner like it was under a microscope. I still make paella like I learned there and the Italians love it.

For me, the 11k's would be fine unless you use more than a 11 inch pan. If you feel the need for more heat you will still have a 15k and the mighty 18k at your beckoning and after all, how many big burners do you need all at one time?.

Now that we have talked versatility, how about visuals? I fully understand the decorator appeal of the Lacanches. We all go back and forth with "Should I make a bold statement with my color or blend in? What trim should I choose. How will it look with this stone counter top?" I am just slightly tired of stainless. Thirty five years of it is enough. I did not want an industrial feel for a vacation house. With the fifteen foot vaulted ceiling and warm colored stone, a stainless Viking or Blue Flame would have looked like a man in overalls at a state dinner...a little out of place...workman like. We chose neutral gray tile and bleached oak cabinets to keep the light summery feel. The marron glace made the range and it's matching Fournaire hood stand out just enough, nothing jarring. The range and hood had perfect dimensions for my kitchen wall. The brushed nickel rails matched in feel with the door pulls. Is there another range that could have fit into the plan as well?

I know that I am reaching the level of being obnoxious and I will stop now. I am starting to sound like I was paid to say this but most of us already have our ranges.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks Chef Marty. Your wise questions reveal that no, no and no, I don't need a warming oven. I was just having a fugue, imagining a warming drawer will somehow make my life slower and fill it with dinner guests. We will get the Sully then to have the gas oven my husband thinks we need.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Even in England, there were times in the summer when I wished I could have turned the Aga off! It would be perfect here in Michigan in the winter.

The food you described, took me right back to Spain! And you are again correct, I usually do cook them in little clay dishes that I bought over there. I occasionally use a large skillet if I run out of little dishes, so the 15,000 BTU burner could be used for that, but otherwise the smaller burners would work well.

The Lacanche works perfectly in your space! We stayed in a old, converted olive mill in Tuscany with a red, Bertazoni. Although, too modern for my taste, it was stunning against the old stone and weathered wood walls. I wonder how it would have looked with a Lacanche?

I have never been a fan of stainless steel. We have chosen Portuguese blue with antique white cabinets, bianco antico granite counters and dark wood floors.

Out of necessity, I may have to go with a brushed stainless steel hood in a canopy shape. I really don't care for the very modern ones that usually come in stainless steel. My first choice would be cooper or a more rustic looking plaster and reclaimed wood hood. But, I can't justify the uplift in cost for the 60" copper hood and I worry that I couldn't find someone who could actually build the plaster one for me. And the cost to have someone construct a plaster one may be more than buying a copper one.

I'll need to decide soon, as I think the rails and hardware will have to be brushed stainless steel if I go with that hood.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

When I bought my range and hood, the Fournaire hoods by Lacanche were not available here in the U.S. and I wonder why. As you can see, they match the range perfectly since they are painted the same color and the style is the same. Are they still not available?

The Bertazoni was on my shortlist of choices along with De Manicor.

Here is a link that might be useful: Other Italian Ranges


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Want to tell me what you think of these colors with existing fabrics?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44, #2

Cabinet color.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44, #3

And another.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44, #4

And another. The last, for now.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I think it depends on how much of the room has these beautiful, bright, cheerful colors. If it's a lot I actually might consider a white enameled range as a nice contrast. I personally have loved our 1956 white enameled range - just not it's function.

If it's only a little of these contrasting colors, then I really like the first one. I think the others match beautifully but won't highlight the range as much.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Kitchendective, I think they all look fabulous with your fabrics! Personally, I am I prefer the darker blue and the coral. Is the second photo of your cabinets? If so, you place the color chips on it? That might make a difference.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Yes, the second pic is the cabinets. The striae fabric is Sunbrella Dupioni in Paradise (cushion on boot bench), and the other stripe is the Roman shades and curtains. Walls are Farrow and Ball Blue Ground. The current counters are white 4x4 tile, as is current backsplash, and I really like the white against the green. I am hesitant to order a Lacanche in white, though, when so many vivid colors that one cannot find elsewhere are available. Plus, I have had three white O'Keefe and Merritts before. This is a laundry room to which we are considering adding a Cormatin or Volnay for a summer/guest kitchen. I will take requested photos later.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Three white OKMs is enough! I vote for the darker blue. :)


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Well, for some reason, I could not get a representative photograph of the enamel chips against the cabinets. However, this may give you an idea of the darker blue against the cabinets; it is the boot bench cushion welt against the bench.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I love the corail blue and am planning to use it myself. Having said that, though, I prefer the darker blue with your other selections. It will be beautiful!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I still prefer the dark blue with your colors. It provides a bit of depth to the more vibrant fabric colors. Good luck!

I am going to see my first Lacanche today! I will report back and let you know what I learn and my thoughts on the physical unit. The owner has already told me that the only regret she has is not ordering the Sully 2200, she owns the Sully 1800!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I'll look forward to hearing all about your visit! Would like to hear how the Sully 1800 cooks and why the 2200 would work well for her.

Thanks for all your responses! I lean toward the Portuguese Blue, too, especially if we get the Cormatin.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Unfortunately, Lacanche is still not selling range hoods here in the US. They only provide a list of recommended providers.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

What a shame about the hood! I wonder why? Can you imagine how beautiful to carry those custom colors through to the hood also? Can any of those recommended companies color-match? Or maybe not. It would be scary to think that they might be a slight shade off.

Maybe if the new customers made enough demand......


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Just as a public announcement, Vent-a-hood has some of the Lacanche colors. The RAL (a color number) for our French Blue Volnay was a VAH color option in their portfolio (not custom). We ended up getting a stainless VAH. Our hood is small and the pics I saw of small painted hoods didn't appeal to me.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

My Portuguese Blue chip looks like RAL Ultramarine, but I am not sure that it is. My RAL deck is old, and I don't have enamel chips.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thank you for the hood information, I'll check into the matching hood colors with VAH. I am really learning towards a plaster and wood one especially after seeing the Lacanche in person yesterday.

The black Sully 1800 with brass trim was beautiful, solid and very well made. I felt every piece and nothing felt flimsy or cheap, as had been reported by some on a English forum.

The configuration starting left to right, two 15,000, one 18,000 Classique, one 5,000, one 11,000, two additional 11,000 and an electric Plancha. The left oven was gas and the right or middle was an electric/convection. The warming cabinet was on the far right.

The owner put all the burners on so I could see the difference between them. Then she turned them as low as they would go and said that it was difficult to get a very low simmer on any of the burners without using the portable simmer plate. She also said heavy cookware was important. I watched as her mother made a grilled cheese on the portable grill. It looked easy and came out looking very nice. The owner said that the portable grill was very heavy, so she usually left it on the range.

She has only been using the Lacanche since May, so there were still several things she had not used yet. Including the plancha and the convection element of the electric oven. So far, she had only used the plancha as a resting spot for spoons, hot pots, etc.

She has used both the gas and the electric ovens and said they both performed very well. The size of the Sully oven is smaller than an American oven, but certainly big enough to cook a turkey, etc. I rarely use all my oven space in my current oven.

The warming oven was bigger than I visualized. It could easily hold rectangular baking dishes, a casserole dish, or several plates of food. I can not wait to slow cook in it!

The owner wasn't using the factory supplied back spacer, she didn't like the way it looked once it arrived. So, she ordered the island spacer and was using it on the back of the unit instead. I saw the back spacer and it looked very commercial and may not go with all kitchens.
I will check with Alisa about doing the same.

The brass on the burner caps and the trim had already started to patina. I thought it looked beautiful and gave the range character.

The only thing the owner would do differently, is order the larger Sully 2200, if she had space. She said the Sully 1800 was large enough for her needs; she has four children and frequently has her mom and dad and friends over. She would get the bigger unit because she loves her range so that she is sure the larger one would be even better!

We had decided we were buying the Cluny 1400, but upon leaving yesterday my husband proclaimed that the Sully 1800 was the perfect size! Fortunately, I predicted his reaction and I was glad I had brought along the price sheet so I could recalculate the price for the larger unit!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

From the bottom of the Lacanche Ventilation page:
"• Lacanche RAL colors are as follows: Ivory �" RAL 9001, French Blue �" RAL 5003, Portuguese Blue �" RAL 5002, Green �" RAL 6009, Provence Yellow �" RAL 1006, Aubergine �" RAL 4007."


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Someone earlier on this thread was trying to remember the fellow with the Cormatin. As I recall, his name was Velodoug. Doug....lived on the Jersey Shore, sold his house and got another stove....Bluestar, maybe? Babied his Cormatin. Way back--2006?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Ok, friends, I need a little memory help! In my (exhaustive/exhausting) search of Lacanche threads, I came across a beautiful kitchen which featured a black LC, blue cabinets and a wonderful hex mosaic tile in pastel-ish colors. For the LIFE of me, I cannot remember the poster, so I cannot find the post. I have gone back through many threads and I have searched the finished kitchens blog, but no success. Can anyone help me out?? Thanks SO MUCH in advance!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

twobelles,
There was a poster with blue cabinets and glass tiles (maybe somewhat iridescent?). I cannot recall whether she had a Lacanche, but she never posted a complete reveal. I think she said she "just used" an already mixed combination of tiles, maybe called "sand and sea'" or something? It was a fairly ornate kitchen with corbels. Does that sound like the one you are thinking of? I apologize, I cannot recall poster's name.

Vedazu, I remember Velodoug. He is the one who said he enjoyed cooking on Bluestar more than on the Cormatin, but he did enjoy his Cormatin immensely. It was orange.

This post was edited by kitchendetective on Thu, Jul 31, 14 at 9:55


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

twobelles,

Are you thinking of this kitchen? Follow the link posted below...

:~)

Here is a link that might be useful: 'backsplash in' thread started by finestra

This post was edited by pentimento on Thu, Jul 31, 14 at 13:08


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Well, that is the one I was thinking of! But Aren't the tiles something like this!

Here is a link that might be useful: Beach blonde blend.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Yes, yes, yes!! THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!

*runs off to follow links*


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I need input on color and range hood. I am getting a neutral contemporary kitchen with Bulthaup cabinets and counters in white laminate similar to the attached photo. My cabinets/counters are in an L and will have an L shaped bank of cabinets to the ceiling opposite them in a matte silver grey laminate.

Both the fridge and dishwasher will have white panels so literally the only color in the kitchen will be the Lacanche. Imagine the Lacanche under the range hood below. We are looking for an updated midcentury modern vibe for the house, neutral wood floors and soft white and grays throughout but accented with our very colorful folk art.

I am torn between four colors: Provence yellow, coral blue, mandarine and olive. Thoughts?

Also, any suggestions on good range hoods for a Sully that will fit the vibe of the kitchen? It will be wall mount.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

The LC color chips laid on the Bulthaup chips below. Provence yellow, DH's favorite:


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Olive, DD's favorite:


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Coral blue, DS' favorite:


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

And mandarine. I like them all, really.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I am not an MCM expert, but I do love that mandarin. Every one of the colors under consideration comes in Jars Cantine dinnerware, said to have an MCM vibe. Have you seen those? All your possibilities look good with the gray.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks kitchendetective. The Jars Cantine dishes are beautiful and an almost identical palette. Of course, the problem is anything goes with a neutral, really. I am liking the mandarin too so that makes our house a perfect split decision (with me casting the deciding vote.)

I have been collecting vintage Cathrineholm enamelware and much of it is a strikingly similar palette as well: orange, olive, gold and medium blue.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Oh, that will be spectacular. Are there any predominating colors in your art collection?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

No it's a mix of brightly painted Oaxacan carved animals, some Russian lacquer, a couple of African carvings and Haitian voodoo flags. All colors, really.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

My favorite is the Provence Yellow followed by the Mandarin. Reading your description, before seeing your photos, the Provence Yellow was the color that came to mind (I think this is one of Lacanche's most timeless colors and I see it working in both traditional and contemporary kitchens). It's a perfect foil for the sedate silver grey.

Regardless, both the yellow and mandarin will POP against the white and look sensational contrasting the silver grey.

I don't know what color your wood floors will be, however, it's worth noting that the yellow and mandarin are similar to the warm tones of wood (just with a ton more color saturation). Whereas the lovely blue is an opposite to the color found in many stained wood floors. The green seems closest in overall impression and feel to the silver grey, and it works well with any wood tones (with a more "natural" look) so I see it as the most subtle of the group.

Looks like whatever you decide you're going to have a gorgeous kitchen!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

My Delft blue Cluny arrived yesterday, and after getting it up a very very steep driveway we had a little party to celebrate! In honor of her origins I served Kir Royale and French 75 cocktails. There are a few weeks to go before the kitchen is ready to receive her queen, so the crate has been closed up again. Now I have plenty of time to plan the first meal!
Driveway push
Almost at the top!
Mission accomplished
Party!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Achauer,

That's fantastic! Love the pics. Ours also recently arrived. We bought a bottle of Volnay to have with our inaugural meal (we got the Volnay model in French Blue) and went to a local french restaurant. It should be up and running by mid/late Sept. They must have been on the same boat! Ours went down a little steep driveway into our garage where it now awaits....tick tock...tick tock.....tick tock....

Best,
Christy


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Beautiful range, achauer! Thank you for sharing your photos. I can't wait to see your baby installed. And, ChristyMcK, I'm happy to hear your Volnay has arrived! I knew the due date was August, and was waiting and watching for arrival news. Congratulations to you both!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

I hesitate to ask here as I don't want to take this thread off track at all, but thought I'd receive some good input - saw some old references to this question - the LaCanche ranges are beautiful and I can see the appeal - I saw mention from one about comparing to Blue Star. For those who have decided on LaCanche -did you evaluate La Cornue, Aga, others? What were the features that helped make your decision and what your close seconds (if you had them)?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Hi MTRead13,

Here was my reasoning:
La Cornue-Too expensive and not as flexible to customize your range.
Aga-On all the time and also not customizable
Blue Star and others like Wolf or Viking-I did not want the professional stainless steel look. These ranges are really built like restaurant ranges but we are at home and to me it is over-kill. Lacanche might be a little light when it comes to the oven racks but unless you are doing home catering, the oven sizes, racks and burners match the need best.

I thought about just about every possible other brand before committing to Lacanche. The beauty and choice of options sold me.

See my other posts for more.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Thanks, Chef Marty! That's helpful and makes sense.


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Can anyone address the amount of oven insulation among the following (assuming similar sizes):
Cornue Fe 1908
Cornue Fe 90
Lacanche Volnay
? TIA


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

No one?


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Kitchendetective, I'm not sure how to measure this but you might check out the weight per sq inch to get an idea? If I recall those Cornufes were a 30" size oven with a 36" range top, a different size than the 39" volnay. A per sq inch might give a weighted diff


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Our Volnay is live! We broke it in last night with a fantastic and simple Zuni omelet with mustard croutons and aged brie, a kale salad and a gruner veltliner. It felt like a triumph after a month of 14-hour work days with a simultaneous kitchen renovation. Work deadline is over. I'm looking forward to getting to stretch our wings with our new beautiful kitchen appliance!


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

That is so exciting Christy! I hope to see a picture :) I am planning on ordering our Volnay in the next week or two. It ended up that a smaller range was better for our kitchen layout, and we'll get the wolf steam convection oven for a second oven. I am so excited! Can't wait to be able to cook on it, although it will be a wait, the footings for I if house were only poured today...


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RE: Lacanche Ranges Part 44

Congrats, ChristyMcK! I'd love to read your thoughts and see photos of your beautiful range.


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